Emeril Lagasse's Creton

Total Time
Prep 24 hrs
Cook 2 hrs

Creton is a french-canadian specialty; this type of "pork pate" is certainly not healthy, but really delicious! I like it spread on toast or crackers, along with hot mustard. Many in Quebec eat it at breakfast. Prep time includes chilling time.

Ingredients Nutrition


  1. In a large saute pan, add the pork and cook until no longer pink, about 3 minutes.
  2. Add the onions and garlic, and cook for 1 minute.
  3. Add the salt, pepper, cloves, cinnamon, ginger, and nutmeg and cook for 1 minute.
  4. Add the milk and bread crumbs and cook for 3 minutes over medium heat, stirring to break up the meat.
  5. Reduce the heat to low, cover, and cook, stirring occasionally, until the pork is very tender and most of the liquid is evaporated, about 1 hour and 15 minutes.
  6. Remove the lid and cook uncovered, stirring occasionally, until the mixture is thick and all the liquid is evaporated, about 10 to 15 minutes.
  7. Remove from the heat and adjust the seasoning, to taste.
  8. Transfer to a decorative bowl or several smaller ramekins, smoothing the top with a rubber spatula.
  9. Cover tightly with plastic wrap and refrigerate until well chilled and firm, at least 4 hours or overnight.
  10. Serve with thinly sliced French bread or toasted French bread croutons.
Most Helpful

3 5

This is pretty close to what my Memere used to make. However, she would slow cook a piece of Boston Pork Butt with the fat on for a few hours so you could shred the meat with a fork. It's less healthy...but very flavorful!

5 5

I liked this recipe! I didn't want to take time to make bread crumbs so I crushed Saltine crackers. Keeping in mind the amount of salt this could add, I adjusted the salt content at the end to my taste.

3 5

the taste is about right except for one thing: I forgot it's Emeril, and it came out a tad salty. Actually, a flat out too salty. I needed to either add more breadcrumbs, or reduce the salt to 1/2 teaspoon so that I can adjust later. It's a lot easier to add than to remove, after all. Otherwise, c'est comme chez nous :)