Scottish Buttermilk Steel Cut Oat Scones

"Steel cut oats are my new passion. I haven't tried this recipe yet, but will shortly. It comes from Bob's Red Mill, an excellent brand of healthy grains, etc. The recipe seems a tad fussy, but my mouth waters just thinking about the yummy (and healthy) end result."
 
Download
photo by babygoat photo by babygoat
photo by babygoat
photo by Bayhill photo by Bayhill
photo by Bayhill photo by Bayhill
Ready In:
55mins
Ingredients:
14
Yields:
8 scones
Advertisement

ingredients

Advertisement

directions

  • Preheat oven to 350F degrees.
  • Place the oats in a pie pan and toast them for 20 minutes, stirring often to toast evenly and not burn.
  • Remove when slightly golden.
  • Combine oats with buttermilk in a small bowl and let stand for 20 minutes.
  • In a large bowl, combine the flours, baking soda, sugar, baking powder, salt and dried currants.
  • Reset the oven to 400F degrees.
  • Butter a baking sheet.
  • Using a pastry blender, cut the 4 tablespoons butter into the flour until the texture is coarsely crumbled.
  • Stir in the buttermilk/oat mixture until combined.
  • Flour your hands and scoop up the dough, forming it into a ball. Do not overmix.
  • Press the ball of dough directly into the pan, then press into a 3/4" thick circle.
  • With a sharp knife, score the surface, almost to the bottom, making eight wedges.
  • Brush the surface with milk and sprinkle a bit of sugar and cinnamon on top.
  • Bake for 12 to 15 minutes.
  • Cut into wedges.

Questions & Replies

  1. Why did you change the recipe from the one at Bob's Red Mill? That one turned out perfect! No baking powder, 1/2 cup of white flour! I also substituted, but, that is beside the point. I sent this around and rechecked it and found that the recipe was inaccurate.
     
Advertisement

Reviews

  1. Why did you change the recipe from the one at Bob's Red Mill? That one turned out perfect! No baking powder, 1/2 cup of white flour! I also substituted, but, that is beside the point. I sent this around and rechecked it and found that the recipe was inaccurate.
     
  2. I tweaked this recipe because when I added the 1/2 cup oat flour and 1/2 cup wheat flour and 1/4 cup white flour - it just wasn't enough to make a dough - I got a watery glob of stuff after I added the soaked steel cut oats. I added more flour and an egg - about a cup more flour in total and still that wasn't just enough and I wound up spooning these onto a baking sheet. The texture was not what I wanted. I have corrected the recipe to reflect the added flour. If you are any kind of baker and have worked with dough, you will see what I mean. The taste of these was ok, but with the revisions (if Food approves) makes this recipe doable. I also added 1 cup of blackberries which made a lot of difference in taste/flavor.
     
  3. I've made a lot of scones and these are extremely dry and bland. 1) One key ingredient that is missing is either an egg or a few more tablespoons of butter to help bind the ingredients together and give the dough more moisture. I added 3 more table spoons of butter 2) Another key element it needs is more sugar. I added a 1/4 cup brown sugar and 1/4 cup granulated sugar. It still wasn't that sweet even with these additions. 3) I would also reduce the amount of oats next time to 3/4 cup unless you like yours super chewy and gritty. Be sure to soak them for at least 25 minutes. I think these simple changes would make the recipe a lot better.
     
  4. I personally thought these were wonderful, I loved the very grainy texture and the sweetness of the currants. I spread a little olive oil based butter on them while they were still warm and thought they were just great. Those who would prefer a sweeter scone, the type with white flours and icing (also very good) may not fully appreciate this hardy recipe. Thanks so much for posting.
     
  5. Delicious!! We loved the chewiness that the steel cut oats added to these scones. I made the recipe as written except that I used dried cranberries instead of the currants. I am always on the lookout for healty scones and this recipe fits the bill. I served these with recipe #196693 and it was a perfect combination. Thank you for sharing this wonderful recipe...it is definitely a keeper. I made this for PAC spring 2007.
     
Advertisement

Tweaks

  1. Why did you change the recipe from the one at Bob's Red Mill? That one turned out perfect! No baking powder, 1/2 cup of white flour! I also substituted, but, that is beside the point. I sent this around and rechecked it and found that the recipe was inaccurate.
     
  2. Delicious!! We loved the chewiness that the steel cut oats added to these scones. I made the recipe as written except that I used dried cranberries instead of the currants. I am always on the lookout for healty scones and this recipe fits the bill. I served these with recipe #196693 and it was a perfect combination. Thank you for sharing this wonderful recipe...it is definitely a keeper. I made this for PAC spring 2007.
     

RECIPE SUBMITTED BY

Married to a handsome husband, Mom to two handsome teenage boys and one handsome poodle. Day job in marketing, I like to cook whenever I can grab time. (Working on making that more rather than less as it has been for quite awhile.) Husband is a trained restaurateur and usually my toughest critic (grumble). We recently redid our kitchen and I'm itching to exercise all of the fun new toys, including my first ever <I>new</i> stovetop/oven. (GE Profile Dual Fuel convection bay-beee!) <b>I enjoy both baking and cooking</b>, and am constrained only by time, not patience. Er, patience that is except when it comes to pie crusts or anything that must be <i>rolled</i>. I simply despise rolling dough, won't do it, won't won't won't, so there! Generally, I look for recipes with fewer rather than more ingredients, but there's almost nothing I won't try (that doesn't need to be rolled!). Raised by a Southern mother, recipes from my youth appeal to me..but then so does Thai and Greek and (fill in cuisine here) as well. I'm also influenced by Jewish cooking (long story), so you can find a nice noodle kugel next to my black eyed peas prepared with ham. <i>Enjoying</i> this site and the energy of the community here immensely! <b>I like reviewing and photographing your recipes</b>, and am especially thrilled when I find an unreviewed or unphotographed gem that I can contribute to. I'm terribly new at this whole food photography thing, so most times my pictures fall in the "better than nothing" category, but I'm learning. Special thanks to my new friends in the food photography forum on the Zaar message board. --------------------------- <b>Rating recipes</b>, that can be a little tricky, can't it? I don't want to spend a lot of space on the topic, but maybe I rated your recipe and you'd like to know. Basically, I'm trying to use five stars for an exceptional "best of breed" kind of rating. Four stars is my "this was really good and pretty darn easy, too". Three stars, "we didn't care for this but I can see how someone else might". Anything lower than three stars, I haven't run into that yet. This is due in part, of course, to how wonderful Zaarites are...and due a bit to how I pick recipes to make. I look for well written instructions, a list of ingredients that my family already likes, and ingredients that are easily obtained without substitutions. Oh, and I <i>follow instructions</i>, that helps. Nothing is sillier than seeing a low rating on an otherwise fine recipe, where the reviewer then proceeds to go on about everything he or she changed, and then dismay at the final outcome...tres silly, don't you think? <b>Zmail me</b> for any reason, really. I've gotten to know some truly cool folks on Zaar already, and (assuming you are truly cool), I'd like to hear from you, too.
 
View Full Profile
Advertisement
Advertisement
Advertisement

Find More Recipes