Roasted Garden Harvest Casserole With Red Potatoes

"This tangy dish was inspired by grandmother, Mamitsa, who immigrated from Greece in the early 1900's. She was a fantastic cook and a real inspiration to the whole family. It's a great hot side dish for a BBQ and easy to make for a small family or a crowd and easy to adjust to whatever is available from the garden or produce aisle. I have created all kinds of variations over the years as more ingredients became more easily available, so feel free to experiment! I cut the potatoes into 8ths, the broccoli into individual florets and the zucchini into 1/2 inch thick coins to make sure the cooking time was about the same for everything. Feel free to substitute any combination of the following cauliflower, broccollini, mushrooms, artichoke hearts, asparagus, roasted red peppers, onions, as much or as little garlic as you like, possibly some cherry tomatoes at the end for color! It's a fantastic way to take advantage of summer's bounty!"
 
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photo by ienjoyanime photo by ienjoyanime
photo by ienjoyanime
photo by ienjoyanime photo by ienjoyanime
Ready In:
55mins
Ingredients:
12
Yields:
1 casserole
Serves:
4-6
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ingredients

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directions

  • Preheat oven to 400°F.
  • Spray a 9-13 casserole with non-stick spray.
  • Clean and prepare the potatoes and veggies, dumping them into a bowl large enough to hold them all.
  • Wash and peel the yellow peel off a large lemon and add to a food processor with the juice from the lemon (being careful to remove bitter seeds), garlic cloves, Italian seasoning, salt, pepper, Worcestershire sauce and olive oil. Process til the lemon peel almost disappears, about 3 minutes. LASTLY, add the red pepper flakes and stir in -- don't process the pepper seeds.
  • Pour the lemon garlic mixture over the veggies and toss til everything is well coated. Pour out into the prepared baking dish. (Can be made ahead to this point, covered and refrigerated. Bring to room temperature before baking).
  • Bake, uncovered, for a total of 35-40 minutes til the everything is golden and the potatoes are fork tender. If adding cherry tomatoes, put them in half way through the baking process and toss through with a wooden spoon. Sprinkle with parmagiano cheese and serve.

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Reviews

  1. ienjoyanime
    I'm sure this wasn't meant to be a vegetarian dish, but either way it is delicious! With a few modifications, it is a perfect vegetarian meal. When I made this, I replaced the Worcestershire sauce with vegan BBQ sauce, and the grated Parmesan with vegetarian shredded Parmesan cheese. It came out absolutely delicious. It has a nice bite to it, which I believe is the red pepper. What I love most is having the zucchini in it because it takes on the flavor of everything in the mixture. I will definitely be making this again!
     
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Tweaks

  1. ienjoyanime
    I'm sure this wasn't meant to be a vegetarian dish, but either way it is delicious! With a few modifications, it is a perfect vegetarian meal. When I made this, I replaced the Worcestershire sauce with vegan BBQ sauce, and the grated Parmesan with vegetarian shredded Parmesan cheese. It came out absolutely delicious. It has a nice bite to it, which I believe is the red pepper. What I love most is having the zucchini in it because it takes on the flavor of everything in the mixture. I will definitely be making this again!
     

RECIPE SUBMITTED BY

Grew up in San Francisco in the 50s where I was exposed to every type of food imaginable and every type of cooking technique the world has to offer. My Greek grandparents lived in an Italian neighborhood peppered with Hispanic familys. They all grew their own herbs in the backyard. Down the street was a Chinese grocer and across the 'Bridge' was my aunt's farm in the heart of the infant wine country. The Farmers Market on Alemany Blvd overflowed with every kind of vegetable, seafood, bushels of Pacific oysters, mushrooms, frogs legs, you name it, it's there. All the big holidays were celebrated in the neighborhood and everyone was invited. Tables were set up in garages up and down the street. The men kept the wine and beer flowing while all the Yayas, Nonnas and aunties worked together in the upstairs kitchen preparing gnocchi, stuffed grape leaves, homemade cheese, wine and everything else you can imagine. I worked one summer at a guest ranch in Calistoga in the early 70's where I learned 'speed' cooking on a flat top, 3 meals a day, 7 days a week for 300 guests. At 16, I didn't last the summer, but I learned a lot. We cooked the freshest food that the valley had to offer. During the school year, I worked for an aunt who ran a catering business in the city. I learned everything about the 'front of the house, from waiting tables, dressing plates just plain doing everything else that needed to be done. I always loved cooking and even considered it as a career, but in those days women in a professional kitchen were virtually non-existant. So I got a job in law enforcement to help pay my way through college and there I stayed until I recently retired after 35 yrs. Now I have the time to explore and re-experience the world I set aside so long ago. I still hope to attend cooking school and would like to believe that it's not just a pipe dream. The thing that irritates me the most is people who refuse to try new foods...even foods native to the US. On a recent trip overseas, Americans sitting a a neighboring table insisted on ordering hamburgers...in a restaurant in Rome! They're missing the whole point of traveling and understanding our neighbors who share the planet with us.
 
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