Total Time
35mins
Prep 25 mins
Cook 10 mins

Taken from Vegetarian Times, March 2003. Since this was first posted, we have made this and found it to be delicious! We didn't have as much okra as the recipe called for, but would recommed using the entire amount suggested as it is an important ingredient. We hope you enjoy it!!!

Ingredients Nutrition

Directions

  1. To make Roux: In medium-sized, heavy-gauge saucepan, heat oil and garlic over medium heat, about 1 minute. Avoid browning garlic. Whisk in flour and increase heat to medium-high. Whisk continuously, and when paste begins to darken, add broth and Worcestershire sauce. Continue to whisk as roux thickens, about 5 minutes. Remove from heat and set aside.
  2. To make Gumbo: Spray 5-quart saucepan with nonstick cooking spray or wipe down with olive oil. Heat saucepan over medium-high heat and add garlic, onion, and pepper. Sauté 3 minutes, and add okra. Cook 5 minutes, and add vegetarian links and seitan. Cook mixture 8 minutes, stirring often. Add sherry.
  3. Add ¾ cup broth to pan. Place tomatoes in food processor, and pulse to chop coarsely. Add tomatoes to broth. Whisk remaining ¼ cup broth into roux, and stir mixture into gumbo. Add thyme, coriander, and hot pepper sauce. Reduce heat to low. Cook for 10 minutes. Remove from heat, and serve.
Most Helpful

3 5

This gumbo was easy to prepare and is relatively healthy, which are major pros. For the meatless meats, I used Tofurkey's Artisan Andouille sausage (which is really good) and Beyond Meat's grilled chicken free strips (which is also my fave these days for chicken). Unfortunately, we did not love this gumbo and found it to be a bit bland for our tastes. It was just ok. We tried to "doctor" it up after tasting it by adding celery salt (since it needed salt and there is no celery in this recipe, which most gumbos have), creole seasoning, gumbo file, and lots of hot pepper to taste. This helped somewhat. I looked back through my other reviews of gumbos that I made when I still ate meat to maybe put my finger on what we did not care for as much. I noticed most of the recipes used very little, if any, tomato sauce, and perhaps it was the quantity of stewed tomatoes that diluted some of the other flavors? Other recipes included celery, one included white wine, and several included more cajun or creole seasonings. I am sure styles of gumbo are personal preference and perhaps many others enjoy theirs with more tomato flavor than we do.