Saturday Morning Soaked Oatmeal Pancakes (Or Waffles)

Total Time
19mins
Prep 15 mins
Cook 4 mins

This recipe was given on a large-family forum when someone posted for a great pancake recipe. I took it, tried it, tweaked it for our family's tastes, and came up with a recipe that our family absolutely loves (and with 11 people to please, that means a lot!). Since the grains are soaked overnight, it is even healthier. Give it a whirl through your waffle maker, too-- it's even better as waffles! I am posting here with permission, and special thanks to my friend Amy's husband's friend, Dale, for the original recipe. While the recipe may seem daunting at first, it is really very easy-- my 11yo daughter is our chief pancake-and-waffle-chef, and she's quite a pro at this recipe now. We serve this with either real maple syrup, homemade maple-flavored syrup (directions on the Maplene box), or yogurt with chocolate syrup and/or fruit. It's great with any topping-- or none at all! Leftover made pancakes or waffles freeze well, or place leftover batter in a jar in the fridge for a day.

Ingredients Nutrition

Directions

  1. Combine oats and flour in a large bowl.
  2. In another bowl combine the whey (or lemon juice) and milk, and stir into the grains.
  3. Cover loosely (we use a plate over the bowl, and drape a clean towel over top, to keep junk or curious kitties from getting into it). Let sit on the counter overnight or for several hours. The oats will soften and lose their shape.
  4. In the morning, add the baking powder, baking soda, melted butter, vanilla, and eggs and stir to combine.
  5. Measure out the 6 tablespoons of apple cider vinegar and call the kids to come watch the next step!
  6. Add the vinegar to the batter all at once and watch it bubble and foam. Stir in once the big action's done, but while it's still bubbling.
  7. Cook as you usually do for pancakes or waffles:.
  8. Preheat a heavy pan over medium heat, until a drop of water dances. If it skitters and sputters really fast the pan is too hot-- you need to let it cool down and try again.
  9. Butter the pan and pour the batter on. For pancakes, we have a small ladle (a gravy ladle; maybe 3 tablespoons?) that we use to measure out the batter.
  10. Cook over medium heat until the rim of the bottom is golden and dry, and the top of the cake is mostly not shiny anymore and if you jiggle the pan it is pretty "set". Carefully turn the cake(s) and cook on the other side until the bottom rim is golden and you see steam emanating from the top of it.
  11. Remove from the pan and place on a wire rack to cool a bit while cooking the rest (they get snatched up so fast in our house they don't have a chance to get very cool, but if you put them straight on a plate they'll get soggy).
  12. Continue cooking until everyone's satisfied, then cook up the rest to freeze for later if there's any batter left.
  13. When the pan is perfectly clean before starting, and the heat is just the right temperature, we only need to butter the pan for the first pancake. We use heavy stainless steel pans, so YMMV on this depending on your cookware.
  14. For waffles, just cook as normal for your waffle maker. They're *perfect* for pancakes or waffles, with no adjustments.
  15. This recipe, as written, serves 10 for our family. Prep time does not include the overnight soaking. Cooking time is for one pancake at a time and YMMV depending on your cookware and stove.
Most Helpful

5 5

This recipe is fantastic. Truly. It is one of the tastiest pancake recipes, and certainly the best whole grain/oat one I have made, and believe me I have tried a lot of them. It is also huge. Use your largest mixing bowl, plan to take 1-2 hours to cook them all, but you will feed your entire family and have plenty left to freeze. They re-heat nicely in the toaster oven. I only use 1 stick of butter, not 2, and I add 1 tsp salt also. Otherwise follow it exactly. Don't worry about leaving the batter on the counter overnight as long as you add the whey or lemon juice. I usually do this using raw milk and have never had a problem, even up to 24 hours. The batter may start to smell yeasty, like bread dough, but as long as it doesn't stink, it is fine. IT is totally worth taking the time once a month or so.