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    You are in: Home / Recipes / Pickled Corn Recipe
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    Pickled Corn

    Total Time:

    Prep Time:

    Cook Time:

    673 hrs 30 mins

    1 hrs 30 mins

    672 hrs

    bshemyshua's Note:

    In our early married years my husband always talked about his grandmother's pickled corn but with a child's view point the only thing I could get out of him was that she pickled it on the cob in ten gallon crocks, that he and his brother used to get into before it was ready, and that it was really good. So after doing some searching when we didn't have a computer, I found some general directions in the Foxfire Wood Stove Cookery book and Carla Emery's Old Fashioned Recipe Book. I played around with proportions and found the right combination. If you are from W.Va., Kentucky, Georgia or anywhere along the Alleghany Mountain Range you will probably be familiar with this pickle. The flavor of the brine is similiar to saurkraut but the corn flavor still comes through. Good with mash potatoes.Hope you enjoy it.(yield depends on size of ears and method of canning. Cooking time is curing time)

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    Ingredients:

    Serves: 72

    Yield:

    pints c ...

    Units: US | Metric

    Directions:

    1. 1
      Shuck and clean corn silk from fresh corn. We usually give this job to the children while they sit on the back porch.
    2. 2
      Fill a large stock pot with water and bring to a boil.
    3. 3
      Scald the ears of corn 2-3 minutes and remove to a kitchen table or counter to cool just enough to handle.
    4. 4
      At this point you can leave corn on the ears and pack in 1 gallon jars, lay ears in an 8-10 gallon crock or cut the corn off the ears and fill a clean white cotton pillow case with the cut corn then lay in your crock. We find the most consistent results with a crock.
    5. 5
      Use 1 cup salt to 1 gallon of water and stir to dissolve making your brine 1 gallon at a time because the amount you use will depend on whether you leave the ears whole or cut the corn off the cob.
    6. 6
      Once the corn is in jars/crock pour the brine over the corn to cover.If you use a crock lay a glass or stoneware dinner plate upside down over the top and weight it down with a large stone. If you use the gallon jars very loosely screw flats and rings on so the tops will not bulge or burst as the vegetable ferments.
    7. 7
      Cover crock with a loose cloth or cover with plastic wrap and tape to keep dust and bugs out.
    8. 8
      Set in a cool, dry place to cure for 4 weeks. Be sure to check the brine level every 7-10 days and make more brine as needed.
    9. 9
      If scum develops because of the fermentation, skim off, replenish liquid and recover.
    10. 10
      At the end of 4 weeks you may can the loose corn in canning jars according to directions for saurkraut or you may leave in crock. You just have to keep checking the liquid level and replenishing as needed.
    11. 11
      If using gallon jars, hand tighten and keep under refridgeration or can as you would saurkraut.
    12. 12
      To use: you may rinse and heat to boiling with a little water and butter or if you have pressure canned it you may eat straight from the jar. My husbands favorite way.

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    Ratings & Reviews:

    • on May 25, 2013

      55

      I have been looking for YEARS for this recipe. My grandmother raised me and as a child I loved to go to the cellar and get the wonderful pickled ears of corn out of the crock and just eat it like that. Bless you for posting this recipe. I will be making this shortly. Thanks so very much.

      people found this review Helpful. Was this review helpful to you? Yes | No
    • on June 15, 2011

      This is the same recipe that has been passed down through the years from generation to generation in my family...thank you for posting it.

      people found this review Helpful. Was this review helpful to you? Yes | No

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    Nutritional Facts for Pickled Corn

    Serving Size: 1 (158 g)

    Servings Per Recipe: 72

    Amount Per Serving
    % Daily Value
    Calories 87.7
     
    Calories from Fat 12
    14%
    Total Fat 1.3 g
    2%
    Saturated Fat 0.3 g
    1%
    Cholesterol 0.0 mg
    0%
    Sodium 1588.7 mg
    66%
    Total Carbohydrate 19.0 g
    6%
    Dietary Fiber 2.0 g
    8%
    Sugars 6.3 g
    25%
    Protein 3.3 g
    6%

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