Potato Omelette (Maacouda Bil Batata)

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Total Time
30mins
Prep 15 mins
Cook 15 mins

From “North African Cooking” by Hilaire Walden. Serve it as a substantial snack, or a light lunch accompanied by a green salad. It is good eaten cold as well as warm, and makes a wonderful picnic food. See my Hreesa/Harissa (Red Pepper Spice)

Ingredients Nutrition

Directions

  1. Cook the potatoes in a pan of boiling water until tender.
  2. Meanwhile, heat 2 tbsp oil in a frying pan and fry the onion, until soft and lightly browned.
  3. Stir in the garlic and cook, stirring until fragrant.
  4. Drain the potatoes and return to the saucepan.
  5. Over low heat, mash the potatoes, then stir in the onions and garlic. Remove from heat.
  6. In a mixing bowl, lightly wihisk the eggs with the harissa, herbs and salt. Gradually beat the egg mixture into the potatoes.
  7. Heat the remaining oil in a large heavy frying pan, add the egg and potato mixture and cook over a very low heat until the bottom has set.
  8. Brown the top under a hot broiler.
Most Helpful

5 5

Zaar gremlins gobbled up my first review! So here goes again! A really delicious omelette though I did make a few changes to meet personal taste preferences: zero tolerance of anything hot and spicy. I've often made omelettes with diced raw potatoes, and dubbed them - rather inelegantly - chip omelettes, so I was intrigued with the mashed potatoes in this. I made more mashed potato than I needed then, in a last minute decision to add some sliced mushrooms, ended up using considerably less than the specified amount of mashed potato. And I must say that mashed potato in an omelette: YUMMY! In place of the harissa and cilantro (which I was out of) I added sage, rosemary and basil. I'd placed some half dozen herbs on the kitchen bench and these were the three I ended up using. And I did use the parsley. The result was a truly scrumptious omelette, though to satisfy my curiosity, I will be making this again - with the correct ratio of potatoes and adding the egg to the potatoes rather than the potatoes to the egg, as I still rather wonder if this might not result in something more like a large potato cake than what we'd conventionally call an omelette. Thanks for sharing this really interesting recipe, Engrossed. I know that I'll be playing with it again!