Spiced Blueberries

A beautiful condiment from the New England chapter of the United States Regional Cookbook, Culinary Arts Institute of Chicago, 1947. While this recipe is written in an old-fashioned way, it is perfectly safe if processed using modern methods. If you are unfamiliar with these modern methods, please go to http://www.uga.edu/nchfp/how/can_home.html for the current information.

Ready In:
1hr 10mins
Yields:
Units:

ingredients

directions

  • Place berries in a large saucepan and add vinegar and spices; boil for 30 minutes.
  • Add sugar and boil for an additional 30 minutes or until thickened sufficiently.
  • Stir occasionally after adding sugar to prevent scorching.
  • Pour into sterilized jars and seal.
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RECIPE MADE WITH LOVE BY

@Molly53
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@Molly53
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"A beautiful condiment from the New England chapter of the United States Regional Cookbook, Culinary Arts Institute of Chicago, 1947. While this recipe is written in an old-fashioned way, it is perfectly safe if processed using modern methods. If you are unfamiliar with these modern methods, please go to http://www.uga.edu/nchfp/how/can_home.html for the current information."
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  1. Food Snob
    I made this today using frozen blueberries. The recipe worked perfectly and it jelled quite solid. If I were to make it again however, I think I might reduce the cinnamon a smidge. I water bathed it for 15 min and I made it into a single one litre bottle. I'm trying to imagine how one might use this condiment. I think it seems like a thick jam, so it'll likely go on toast or bagels. The reason I'm not rating it is because I didn't care for the texture, but I think it's just my own issue of personal preference and I didn't want to taint a perfectly fine recipe that worked well. Thank you for sharing! I'm always fascinated to learn how to make things the 'old way' and still get great results.
    Reply
  2. Molly53
    A beautiful condiment from the New England chapter of the United States Regional Cookbook, Culinary Arts Institute of Chicago, 1947. While this recipe is written in an old-fashioned way, it is perfectly safe if processed using modern methods. If you are unfamiliar with these modern methods, please go to http://www.uga.edu/nchfp/how/can_home.html for the current information.
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