Fasolakia Ladera

This is a traditional Greek recipe. I grew up eating this as a child, and I think it's fantastic. Can be served both hot or cold.

Ready In:
55mins
Serves:
Units:

ingredients

directions

  • Heat oil in heavy large nonstick skillet over medium-high heat.
  • Add onion and saute 5 minutes.
  • Add green beans and cayenne pepper and saute until onion is translucent, about 3 minutes.
  • Add potatoes and parsley.
  • Pour tomato paste over vegetables.
  • Bring to boil.
  • Reduce heat.
  • Cover and simmer until potatoes are tender, stirring frequently, about 45 minutes.
  • Season with salt and pepper.
  • Remove from heat.
  • Serve warm or at room temperature.
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"This is a traditional Greek recipe. I grew up eating this as a child, and I think it's fantastic. Can be served both hot or cold."
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  1. Tesi K.
    I imagine that "tomato paste" means something else to the author than to me. In the U.S., anyway, tomato paste is a thick, concentrated... well... paste. It doesn't pour, and it doesn't provide enough liquid to boil anything in. Having added 8 oz of tomato paste, I was left with a powerfully over-tomato-ed glop, and no cooking liquid. Thus, adding water became necessary, which I did. The potatoes never cooked -- they were still crunchy after an hour's simmering. The recipe calls for an ounce of carrot, but never says when or how it goes into the pot. There's no garlic, which I suppose is simply how this person likes their fasolakia. Nor is there cinnamon, which is pretty traditional, yes? Overall, a frustrating experience producing a barely edible dish. Might have been much better had I used 8 oz of tomato sauce, or of diced tomatoes or crushed tomatoes or even halved Romas in liquid. Tomorrow I will put the remains in a big pot with a lot of water, simmer it for a few hours with beans and some green spice, and see if I can make a rich soup from it.
    Reply
  2. NYFinancialTrust
    Excellent recipe! For something uniquely 'Greek' I would only add 1/2 teaspoon of ground cinnamon at the very end.
    Reply
  3. CoCaShe
    Over all, good side dish. I cut down on the oil and added some V8 juice as I was cooking so it stayed moist and didn't stick to the pot (although still stuck a little). My only complaint is that the flavours of the tomato were quite mild, but I accidentally added Cayenne pepper instead of regular, so that's my fault =)
    Reply
  4. BarbieRose
    Wonderful, just as I remembered. I didn't measure anything and with Step 5 threw a handful of cherry tomatoes in the pan. Thanks... Babbo
    Reply
  5. Tribute_to_Erasmus
    This is a traditional Greek recipe. I grew up eating this as a child, and I think it's fantastic. Can be served both hot or cold.
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