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Beer Can Duck

Beer Can Duck created by DoctorDave

A variation on beer can chicken. I did this with a can of iced tea rather than beer but I don't think it makes that big a difference (my beer can chicken does not taste like beer and this duck did not taste like tea - the flavors come from the rub). Remember roasting duck is not like roasting chicken. The skin of a duck is massively fatty and the meat is dark meat. You need a lot of cooking time and you want the fat to drip out. Piercing the outer layer of skin and long roasting time will accomplish this and will leave you with a crispy delicious skin.

Ready In:
3hrs 15mins
Serves:
Units:

ingredients

directions

  • Salt the duck and place it uncovered in the refrigerator overnight to dry out.
  • Preheat oven to 425.
  • Pierce the duck skin with a sharp knife in multiple locations (10 to 20 pierces over the whole duck). Make sure not to pierce through to the meat. Piercing at an angle will help to ensure you only go through skin and fat.
  • Combine ingredients for the rub and rub over the entire duck.
  • Open the can, empty half and pierce 2-3 extra holes in the top. Optionally you can make extra rub and add to the can.
  • Plug the duck neck opening with a small lime or shallot or spud (whatever you have handy that's golfball size).
  • Stand the can in a relatively deep drip pan with a bit of water in the pan (preferably using a beer butt stand which you can get for $6 or less) and lower the duck onto the can shoving it into the backside as far up as it goes.
  • Place in oven and roast for one hour at 425, then one hour at 375, and then one hour at 325.
  • Remove from oven and carefully separate can from bird then carve and serve.
  • You will have a huge amount of rendered duck fat in the pan which you can refrigerate or freeze and save for future use.
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RECIPE MADE WITH LOVE BY

@DoctorDave
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@DoctorDave
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"A variation on beer can chicken. I did this with a can of iced tea rather than beer but I don't think it makes that big a difference (my beer can chicken does not taste like beer and this duck did not taste like tea - the flavors come from the rub). Remember roasting duck is not like roasting chicken. The skin of a duck is massively fatty and the meat is dark meat. You need a lot of cooking time and you want the fat to drip out. Piercing the outer layer of skin and long roasting time will accomplish this and will leave you with a crispy delicious skin."
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  1. dlmcpa
    Bought a 6.8 lb duck, used chicken broaster stand filled with dark amber ale, stuffed half lemon in the neck to keep moisture in and a rub. HOWEVER, cooking time on convection roast was only 1 hr at 425, when we were expecting 2 more hours per this recipe. It cooked too fast, but all the fat drained and skin was crisp. My Convection oven book says 20 mins/lb at 325. Next time, if using convection be careful on time and temp. Duck was a little tough but not ruined, for the most part still good and moist. Slower roasting would have been better. Lucky we used a thermometer!
    Reply
  2. gpotts5626
    I had never prepared duck before, but my daughter loves it and I was tired of paying $25/plate for it when we went out to dinner. My only suggestion is to cut down the cooking time by 15-30 minutes. I had a 5.5 lb duckling and it came out a little dry. The flavor was excellent. I used a dark beer and put about a tbs of the rub in it.
    Reply
  3. DoctorDave
    Beer Can Duck Created by DoctorDave
    Reply
  4. DoctorDave
    A variation on beer can chicken. I did this with a can of iced tea rather than beer but I don't think it makes that big a difference (my beer can chicken does not taste like beer and this duck did not taste like tea - the flavors come from the rub). Remember roasting duck is not like roasting chicken. The skin of a duck is massively fatty and the meat is dark meat. You need a lot of cooking time and you want the fat to drip out. Piercing the outer layer of skin and long roasting time will accomplish this and will leave you with a crispy delicious skin.
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