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Turkish Meatballs

I learned to make this at a Turkish cooking class. Serve it with a variety of Middle Eastern dishes and feel free to adjust the seasonings to your taste. What I've given is an absolute minimum, but when I make the meatballs I normally throw in extra cumin and sometimes chilli flakes. You can also make this with minced beef.

Ready In:
25mins
Yields:
Units:

ingredients

directions

  • Cook the bulgur by covering it with a cup of boiling water and letting it soak in a covered bowl for about 10 minutes.
  • Uncover and let cool for a few minutes.
  • Meanwhile, put the rest of the ingredients except the parsley in a mixing bowl.
  • Add in the cooled bulgur and use your hands to thoroughly mix everything together.
  • Roll them with your hands into balls around the same size as a golf ball and flatten them a little.
  • Now you can either bake them in a hot oven for around 10 minutes or fry them in hot oil until they are browned all over.
  • Serve with parsley sprinkled on top.
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RECIPE MADE WITH LOVE BY

@Sackville
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@Sackville
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"I learned to make this at a Turkish cooking class. Serve it with a variety of Middle Eastern dishes and feel free to adjust the seasonings to your taste. What I've given is an absolute minimum, but when I make the meatballs I normally throw in extra cumin and sometimes chilli flakes. You can also make this with minced beef."
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  1. Daydream
    These are very tasty. I used 750g ground beef which I had on hand, and therefore reduced the bulgar wheat (bourghal) to 1/2 cup. I also used rounded tsp of the spices instead of level. I served these with 1/2 cup Greek Yoghurt, through which I mixed 2 tablespoons finely chopped mint, 1/2 Lebanese cucumber, chopped into small pieces, and 2 tsp lemon juice.
    Reply
  2. Colors
    Turkish cuisine is very sophisticated and uses a lot of spices. However, these meatballs are not what is typically cooked, at least where I grew up. When I think of meatballs, I think of meat, bread crumbs, cumin, black pepper, salt, lots of freshly chopped parsley and onions. But, there are many regional variations to many dishes.
    Reply
  3. breton cove dreamer
    These were very tasty. I served it with Turkish Salad and hummus. Next time I will add a little salt and a little more spice and have some pita on hand. I especially enjoyed having that bit of sweet of the raisin. every so often
    Reply
  4. denizkizi
    Just wanted to clarify, spices are a very large part of the Turkish cuisine - which happens to be one of the most varied and colourful cuisines in the world - and have been so for hundreds of centuries. I find comments that state otherwise comical.
    Reply
  5. Chef S-love-J
    Just to let you know, this recipe isn't Turkish. Meatballs, AKA "kofte" is Turkish but spices such as cinnamon, cloves and raisons are not...especially in main dishes. Dishes with those kind of spices are more Arab than anything. Turks really don't use much of any spices. They tend to use vegetables, salt and pepper for any flavor they need. So if you see lots of spices, know that it is not Turkish
    Reply
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