Traditional Cornish Pastie

Traditional Cornish Pastie created by SharonChen

The original version of this recipe was found at Britain Express. For many generations wives in Corwall would make these 'Hot Pockets' of meat and vegetables, often leftovers from the previous nights supper for their miner, dock worker, etc. husbands to take to work for their noon meal. This recipe represents the traditional recipe when it was made from scratch. This recipe is not made with puff pastry but with a simple pie crust which the British call 'shortcrust pastry'. If you wish to cut corners you can use premade refrigerated pie crusts from the supermarket.

Ready In:
1hr 15mins
Serves:
Yields:
Units:

ingredients

  • 2 unbaked pie crusts
  • 1 medium potato (peeled and cubed into small cubes)
  • 1 medium onion (chopped)
  • 1 small rutabaga (uncooked, peeled and chopped)
  • 12 lb of lean roast (cut into small cubes) or 1/2 lb steak (cut into small cubes)
  • 1 teaspoon salt
  • 1 teaspoon black pepper
  • 1 small amount cold water

directions

  • Add the potato, onion, rutabega, meat and spices together and mix well.
  • Lay out one of the pie crusts and put half the ingredients on half of the pie crust leaving about 1 inch along the edge for sealing.
  • Lightly dampen along the edges of the pie crust with your fingertips.
  • Lay the other half of the pie crust over the top of the filling and press the top and bottom edges together well.
  • Fold the sealed edge toward the center and either crimp with your fingers or press along the entire folded edge with the tines of a fork.
  • Bake 425 degrees F. for 15 minutes then lower temperature to 350 degrees F for an additional 30 minutes.
  • Serve hot with brown or white gravy or serve cold without.
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RECIPE MADE WITH LOVE BY

@CarrolJ
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@CarrolJ
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"The original version of this recipe was found at Britain Express. For many generations wives in Corwall would make these 'Hot Pockets' of meat and vegetables, often leftovers from the previous nights supper for their miner, dock worker, etc. husbands to take to work for their noon meal. This recipe represents the traditional recipe when it was made from scratch. This recipe is not made with puff pastry but with a simple pie crust which the British call 'shortcrust pastry'. If you wish to cut corners you can use premade refrigerated pie crusts from the supermarket."

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  1. dave c.
    I really find it amusing all the helpful comments of "Thats not how its done" cooking is an art not just a science make things to your own taste and that of your family make it an adventure be positive.
  2. Russell R.
    You never put gravy on a Cornish Pastie. If you want to eat it the way real Cornish people eat it, you put Vinegar on it. I've had Upper Michigan Pasties. When you make it with ground beef like they do, IT'S NOT A REAL PASTIE.
  3. sales
    You are missing shredded cabbage and garlic in the meat mix and you never, never, ever put gravy on a pasty! The meat mixture is cooked up together (like a giant pot of hash) before filling the pastries, you don't add raw veggies to the pastry. These are meat pies, Cornish miner's lunch, not Irish. If you put anything on these you shake on red wine vinegar on the steaming meat mixture after you cut open the pastry. I know, sounds strange, but that is how you eat them and it's absolutely delicious. If you don't have leftover roast, use lean ground beef. Garlic was not part of the original but it really adds to the flavor. You also make these individually sized, not huge like the recipe states.
  4. girlreddish
    This is definitely NOT like the ones made in the Upper Peninsula of MI, but similar. In the Michigan version we used only beef, but don't know why you couldn't make them without meat altogether or with chicken or lamb or whatever you like, even bits of sausage. Without beef, it will not taste the same, but would be fine. I also add diced carrots. We use no gravy, but I like to dab ketchup on mine on my plate! It's purely an individual preference. Also, poke a hole in the top before baking to allow steam to escape. The meat is always cooked beforehand, but diced vegetables are not (onions, carrots, potatoes, turnips or rutabagas.) Yes, the filling is fairly dry when done.
  5. girlreddish
    I added carrots and eliminated the gravy.
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