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The Raffles Hotel Original Singapore Gin Sling Cocktail

The Raffles Hotel Original Singapore Gin Sling Cocktail created by AmandaInOz

The Singapore Sling is one of those wonderful drinks that we probably have all heard of, but perhaps have never had. And because this recipe is often incorrectly recorded in most recipe books, even if you've think you've had it, you probably haven't. One of the key, and often overlooked ingredients in this drink is Benedictine. While the resulting flavour is not overly predominate, it does add a certain taste profile that would be totally missing without this secret ingredient. None dispute that the Singapore Sling was originally created by Mr. Ngiam Tong Boon for the Raffles Hotel in Singapore. However that is where the agreements end. The exact date is in question, with some people claiming it was in 1915, some 1913, while the hotel itself claims that it was created sometime prior to 1910. There is also plenty of disagreement as to how closely the current version of this drink that is served at Raffles is to what was originally served. Apparently the original recipe was lost and forgotten sometime in the 1930's, and the drink that they currently serve at the hotel's Long Bar (see recipe below) is based on memories of former bartenders, and some written notes that they were able to discover. Whatever the truth may be, this "iconic" drink is still enjoyed today, as much as it was back in the early 20th century! Maybe, the only way to really appreciate this cocktail, is to sip it slowly whilst sitting in a rattan chair, under the ceiling fans in the Long Bar at Raffles Hotel!

Ready In:
3mins
Serves:
Yields:
Units:

ingredients

  • 1 12 ounces gin
  • 12 ounce cherry heering
  • 14 ounce Cointreau liqueur
  • 14 ounce benedictine
  • 4 ounces pineapple juice
  • 12 ounce lime juice
  • 13 ounce grenadine
  • 1 dash bitters

directions

  • Shake with ice.
  • Strain into an ice filled collins glass.
  • Garnish with cherry and slice of pineapple.
  • SINGAPORE SLING.
  • The Singapore Sling was created at Raffles Hotel at the turn-of-the-century by Hainanese-Chinese bartender, Mr. Ngiam Tong Boon.
  • In the Hotel's museum, visitors may view the safe in which Mr. Ngiam locked away his precious recipe books, as well as the Sling recipe hastily jotted on a bar-chit in 1936 by a visitor to the Hotel who asked the waiter for it.
  • Originally, the Singapore Sling was meant as a woman's drink, hence the attractive pink colour. Today, it is very definately a drink enjoyed by all, without which any visit to Raffles Hotel is incomplete.
  • Metric Measurements as printed on the orginal raffles Hotel menu.
  • 30ml Gin.
  • 15 ml Cherry Brandy.
  • 120 ml Pineapple Juice.
  • 15 ml Lime Juice.
  • 7.5 ml Cointreau.
  • 7.5 ml Dom Benedictine.
  • 10 ml Grenadine.
  • A Dash of Angostura Bitters.
  • Garnish with a slice of Pineapple and Cherry.
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RECIPE MADE WITH LOVE BY

@French Tart
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@French Tart
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"The Singapore Sling is one of those wonderful drinks that we probably have all heard of, but perhaps have never had. And because this recipe is often incorrectly recorded in most recipe books, even if you've think you've had it, you probably haven't. One of the key, and often overlooked ingredients in this drink is Benedictine. While the resulting flavour is not overly predominate, it does add a certain taste profile that would be totally missing without this secret ingredient. None dispute that the Singapore Sling was originally created by Mr. Ngiam Tong Boon for the Raffles Hotel in Singapore. However that is where the agreements end. The exact date is in question, with some people claiming it was in 1915, some 1913, while the hotel itself claims that it was created sometime prior to 1910. There is also plenty of disagreement as to how closely the current version of this drink that is served at Raffles is to what was originally served. Apparently the original recipe was lost and forgotten sometime in the 1930's, and the drink that they currently serve at the hotel's Long Bar (see recipe below) is based on memories of former bartenders, and some written notes that they were able to discover. Whatever the truth may be, this "iconic" drink is still enjoyed today, as much as it was back in the early 20th century! Maybe, the only way to really appreciate this cocktail, is to sip it slowly whilst sitting in a rattan chair, under the ceiling fans in the Long Bar at Raffles Hotel!"
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  1. annekopalstuart
    Ages ago, when I was in my late teens, My Dad had a Biz Trip to Singapore, of course Dad HAD to take me to the Historic Raffles Hotel. We visited the Bar, and the first REAL Alcoholic drink My Dad purchased for me Was a REAL Singapore Sling.
    Reply
  2. doctor_work
    The recipe given (in ounces) has the correct conversions of all the ingredients printed on the menu (in ml) except for the gin. 30 ml of gin is basically 1 oz., not 1.5 oz. Was this change deliberate or an accident? The higher amount makes the drink more alcoholic and more "ginny", of course, but I'm guessing it was a mistake, since it seems your intention was to duplicate the Raffles Hotel's recipe.
    Reply
  3. Nancy A.
    Little over a year later 03/02/19.......I was watching the "Letter". I looked it up by Google...saw your post! Will compare gin sling, to Singpore sling. I remembered I liked them in my younger years. With this reminder, it would be a shame to defy the fates. Bottoms up!
    Reply
  4. Judy S.
    I have just watched an old black and white movie called The Letter which featured a Gin Sling it looked to have a lot of foliage in it!! Obviously it was impossible to see the colour of it but presumably it was the Singapore Gin??
    Reply
  5. Cody H.
    I will try your recipe, but the recipe from the 1946 version of the gentleman's companion vol2 exotic drink book is way different from your recipe. I think you are using a modern adaptation. I wonder where you are getting yours?
    • Review photo by Cody H.
    Replies 2
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