Shepherd's Pie

Many chefs would argue that this should be called "Cottage Pie" since it calls for beef rather than lamb but I've never heard of it being made without meat! Personally, I think this is an excellent dish, full of flavour Although not included in the original list of ingredients, I tossed in a handful of frozen peas & corn before assembling - leftover veggies could also be used. This recipe was created by Toronto's own Lucy Waverman & published in the Autumn 2007 edition of Food & Drink magazine. Thank you Lucy!

Ready In:
1hr
Serves:
Units:

ingredients

directions

  • FILLING: Heat oil in a skillet over medium heat; add vegetables & saute until softened, about 4 minutes.
  • Crumble beef & add to mixture along with garlic, cayenne, thyme and salt & pepper to taste; saute until beef loses its pinkness, about 3 minutes, then drain off excess fat.
  • Stir in flour & remaining ingredients for the filling; bring to a boil, reduce heat & simmer for 30 to 35 minutes or until the sauce has thickened to the consistency that you prefer.
  • TOPPING: Cook potatoes in boiling salted water until tender, about 20 minutes; drain well, return to pot & dry off on turned-off burner.
  • Mash with butter & milk; stir in freshly ground pepper.
  • ASSEMBLY: Spoon beef mixture into a medium sized baking dish & top with potato mixture.
  • Bake for 20 to 25 minutes in a preheated 375F oven or until mixture is bubbling.
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@CountryLady
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@CountryLady
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"Many chefs would argue that this should be called "Cottage Pie" since it calls for beef rather than lamb but I've never heard of it being made without meat! Personally, I think this is an excellent dish, full of flavour Although not included in the original list of ingredients, I tossed in a handful of frozen peas & corn before assembling - leftover veggies could also be used. This recipe was created by Toronto's own Lucy Waverman & published in the Autumn 2007 edition of Food & Drink magazine. Thank you Lucy!"
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  1. Faithberry78
    I followed the recipe thoroughly, except i did not add meat. It came out ok. The problem was, i did not know how many potatoes to use, since i did not have a scale to weigh them on. I think i made too many of them, and they overwhelmed the meal. Wow, did it smell delicous when it was cooking though.
    Reply
  2. marywest77
    At first, I thought I overdid the cayenne...but it's really really good. I did not use the rutabaga/turnip ingredient. Overall a very good recipie. I served with corn--though could have easily added to the recipie.
    Reply
  3. CountryLady
    Many chefs would argue that this should be called "Cottage Pie" since it calls for beef rather than lamb but I've never heard of it being made without meat! Personally, I think this is an excellent dish, full of flavour Although not included in the original list of ingredients, I tossed in a handful of frozen peas & corn before assembling - leftover veggies could also be used. This recipe was created by Toronto's own Lucy Waverman & published in the Autumn 2007 edition of Food & Drink magazine. Thank you Lucy!
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