Qiang Chao Xi Lan Hua (Spicy Stir-Fried Broccoli)

Taken from Ji Pin Su Shi (Best Vegetable Dishes), a 30-cent, 5-in-square, paperback cookbook from Wal-Mart in China. Simple, home-style Chinese fare. Chinese cooks are expected to determine the proportions of condiments and seasonings. Everything is "ge shi liang"--to taste. I've suggested amounts, but if they don't seem right, just trust your own tastebuds.

Ready In:
20mins
Serves:
Units:

ingredients

  • 200 g broccoli
  • 4 dried red chilies (to taste)
  • 4 tablespoons vegetable oil (to taste)
  • 12 teaspoon szechuan peppercorns (to taste)
  • 14 teaspoon salt (to taste)
  • 14 teaspoon msg (to taste)

directions

  • Wash broccoli, chop into florets, blanch in boiling water, and drain.
  • Chop dried chilies into 1/2-cm segments.
  • Heat empty wok over highest heat. Add oil and swirl to heat through. Add chilies and peppercorns and toss briefly until fragrant but not burned. Add broccoli and stir briefly. Add salt and MSG, toss, and serve as part of a Chinese meal: rice, soup, and a balanced variety of dishess--one per person.
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RECIPE MADE WITH LOVE BY

@Kate S.
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@Kate S.
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"Taken from Ji Pin Su Shi (Best Vegetable Dishes), a 30-cent, 5-in-square, paperback cookbook from Wal-Mart in China. Simple, home-style Chinese fare. Chinese cooks are expected to determine the proportions of condiments and seasonings. Everything is "ge shi liang"--to taste. I've suggested amounts, but if they don't seem right, just trust your own tastebuds."
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  1. Kate S.
    Taken from Ji Pin Su Shi (Best Vegetable Dishes), a 30-cent, 5-in-square, paperback cookbook from Wal-Mart in China. Simple, home-style Chinese fare. Chinese cooks are expected to determine the proportions of condiments and seasonings. Everything is "ge shi liang"--to taste. I've suggested amounts, but if they don't seem right, just trust your own tastebuds.
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