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Ottolenghi's Chickpea Cooking Method

Ottolenghi's Chickpea Cooking Method created by gailanng

This is Yotam Ottolenghi's method for cooking chickpeas, which he learned from his friend Sami Tamimi's grandmother. Some people like to use this method to cook chickpeas for hummus, because it makes the skins very soft, and this results in a smoother hummus. The chickpeas are sautéed with baking soda for a few minutes, before dumping in the water to simmer the chickpeas. The baking soda makes the water more alkaline, which softens the chickpeas more quickly by weakening their pectic bonds. Also, sautéing the chickpeas with the baking soda before adding water adds a friction which helps break down the skins and gets the baking soda to penetrate the skin better. This allows them to cook much faster and puree smoother. NOTE - "preparation time" includes soaking time. This method also loosens and removes the skins on the chickpeas, so if your goal is to have whole, intact chickpeas for a recipe, this is not a good method to use.

Ready In:
12hrs 40mins
Yields:
Units:

ingredients

directions

  • The night before, put the chickpeas in a large bowl and cover them with cold water at least twice their volume. Leave to soak overnight for at least 12 or up to 24 hours.
  • The next day, drain the chickpeas. Place a large pot over high heat and add the drained chickpeas and baking soda. Cook for about three minutes, stirring constantly.
  • Add the water and bring to a boil. Reduce heat to a simmer, and cook, skimming off any foam and any skins that float to the surface.
  • The chickpeas will need to cook for 10 to 40 minutes, depending on the type and freshness, sometimes even longer. Start checking them after 10 minutes, and then check every 2 minutes after that. Once done, they should be very tender, breaking up easily when pressed between your thumb and finger.
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RECIPE MADE WITH LOVE BY

@xtine
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@xtine
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"This is Yotam Ottolenghi's method for cooking chickpeas, which he learned from his friend Sami Tamimi's grandmother. Some people like to use this method to cook chickpeas for hummus, because it makes the skins very soft, and this results in a smoother hummus. The chickpeas are sautéed with baking soda for a few minutes, before dumping in the water to simmer the chickpeas. The baking soda makes the water more alkaline, which softens the chickpeas more quickly by weakening their pectic bonds. Also, sautéing the chickpeas with the baking soda before adding water adds a friction which helps break down the skins and gets the baking soda to penetrate the skin better. This allows them to cook much faster and puree smoother. NOTE - "preparation time" includes soaking time. This method also loosens and removes the skins on the chickpeas, so if your goal is to have whole, intact chickpeas for a recipe, this is not a good method to use."
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  1. tdotspace
    I came upon the best trick making this today! I found a way to filter out all the skins without having to peel/pick off even one! it's so laborious to do, and I just never would and then would be stuck with a disturbing amount of skins.... after i cooked them enough (it only took 10 mins), i drained them and then put them back in the pot and filled it with cold water; 1. to stop the cooking 2. to expedite the process of getting them in the freezer. when i started swishing the cold water around, i noticed that the skins started floating to the top! before letting them settle, i carefully drained just the water and yes! just the skins got filtered out! I did this several times until there was NO skins left!! This is very exciting for me :) look at all the skins that came off, none of which i had to do by hand!!
    • Review photo by tdotspace
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  2. 1pmarie
    I used 1 tsp baking soda in 1/2 lb. soaked chickpeas. They turned brown and very mushy. I found, on my next trial, that the baking soda was totally unnecessary.
    Reply
  3. 1pmarie
    omitted baking soda
    Reply
  4. gailanng
    Surely as green apples in July and ripe blueberries in June, I'm gonna make hummus. So much better than using the canned stuff.
    Reply
  5. gailanng
    Ottolenghi's Chickpea Cooking Method Created by gailanng
    Reply
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