Okinawa Stir-Fried Bitter Melon (Goya Chanpuru)

"Okinawa has many chanpuru recipes but Goya chanpuru is the representative of the chanpuru dish. This recipe has originated in the Okinawa region and is now widely popular in Japanese homes. Goya or bitter melon, is a tropical fruit that’s why there’s plenty of it in the Okinawa region which is relatively hot. Most kids are not a fan of this tropical fruit when they first eat it because of its bitter taste but there are ways to remove the bitterness. Goya is very healthy and has a lot of nutrients which can not be taken easily even if it undergoes heating during the cooking process."
 
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photo by Pearl Ishizaki photo by Pearl Ishizaki
photo by Pearl Ishizaki
Ready In:
45mins
Ingredients:
10
Serves:
2
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ingredients

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directions

  • Cut the bitter melon along its length then use a spoon to take the white part with seeds found at the center. Slice the bitter melon thinly then soak it in water with 2 teaspoons of salt. The water should just be a moderate amount, just enough to cover the bitter melon. Soak for about 30 minutes then drain before using.
  • Slice the onion thinly. Wash and drain the bean sprouts, then whisk two pieces of eggs in a bowl.
  • Heat a pan using medium-high heat then add a tablespoon of sesame oil. Add the onions then stir and cook until it is soft.
  • Add the thinly sliced pork then stir and cook until it has browned. Make sure to leave the pork at room temperature for about 20 minutes before cooking so that it will be cooked equally.
  • When the pork is cooked through, add the drained bitter melon in the pan then continue to stir-fry. Cook until the bitter melon has softened.
  • Add the bean sprouts then adjust the taste with salt and pepper. Stir fry for about a minute then pour over the whisked egg. Cook while stirring occasionally until the egg is slightly firm.
  • Remove from heat then serve with some katsuoboshi on top.

Questions & Replies

default avatar
  1. Bill C
    Thank you for posting this recipe! I have not had this in a long time because we couldn't find the goya. I used to live in Okinawa and my wife would make it often. One question though: You stated "Goya is very healthy and has a lot of nutrients which can not be taken easily even if it undergoes heating during the cooking process." I don't quite understand what you meant by "can not be taken easily even if it undergoes heating during the cooking process." Should I be careful not to over-heat it?
     
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RECIPE SUBMITTED BY

Hello! I'm a YouTuber home chef from the Philippines now based in Japan. I love to share the recipes I've learned from my travels around Japan. Please enjoy my recipes.
 
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