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My Scouse

My husband's family come from Liverpool and this recipe is an amalgamation of the Scouse recipes belonging to his Nana, his mum, and his dad. Since I've been using the slow cooker, it has achieved the ultimate accolade; it's as good as Nana's. It is traditionally made with the 'scrag end' but I tend to go for lean stir-fry lamb instead. It is important to use King Edwards if you can find them because they fall and go all mushy during the cooking process.

Ready In:
1hr 10mins
Serves:
Units:

ingredients

directions

  • Pre-heat the oven to 150.
  • Heat up some low-fat cooking spray on the hob and stir-fry the lamb until it is browned on both sides. Transfer to a lidded casserole dish.
  • Use this juice from the lamb to stir-fry the carrots and turnip until just starting to soften. Add to the casserole dish.
  • Pour in the stock. Cover and cook in the oven for an hour.
  • Towards the end of the cooking time, par-boil the potatoes for about 5 - 10 minutes. Add to the casserole dish with salt and a generous amount of pepper and cook at 150 for a further 30 minutes.
  • Remove from the oven and stir. The potatoes should have gone all mushy and sludge-like.
  • At this point, if you're impatient, you could eat the scouse as it is.
  • But it's much better if you transfer it from the casserole into a slow cooker and leave it on medium for about 4 - 6 hours. The flavour will intensify and the lamb will be coming apart,.
  • Serve with crusty bread.
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RECIPE MADE WITH LOVE BY

@Ju_Staniford
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@Ju_Staniford
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"My husband's family come from Liverpool and this recipe is an amalgamation of the Scouse recipes belonging to his Nana, his mum, and his dad. Since I've been using the slow cooker, it has achieved the ultimate accolade; it's as good as Nana's. It is traditionally made with the 'scrag end' but I tend to go for lean stir-fry lamb instead. It is important to use King Edwards if you can find them because they fall and go all mushy during the cooking process."
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  1. jonnybchester
    I have used this simple recipe twicw, my family age range 6yrs to 18 yrs love it and think I'm a genius! (Cooked in a Crock Pot). Thanks for the recipe.
    Reply
  2. Big Dino
    Being an exiled Manc in Liverpool, I'm fond of the local speciality! This is a pretty good version of it. The only reason I'm not giving it 5 stars is probably because of my own deficiencies in making it. I tried to cook it in a slow cooker, and while the taste was very good, the potatoes fell apart a little too quickly. Like I said my fault, rather than that of the recipe.
    Reply
  3. ben9058
    This truly is as good as my Nan makes
    Reply
  4. Ju_Staniford
    My husband's family come from Liverpool and this recipe is an amalgamation of the Scouse recipes belonging to his Nana, his mum, and his dad. Since I've been using the slow cooker, it has achieved the ultimate accolade; it's as good as Nana's. It is traditionally made with the 'scrag end' but I tend to go for lean stir-fry lamb instead. It is important to use King Edwards if you can find them because they fall and go all mushy during the cooking process.
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