Mini Shepherd's Pie-So Good!

Mini Shepherd's Pie-So Good! created by SharonChen

A great recipe from Aaron McCargo on Big Daddys' House. On Food Network, this recipe has 52 outstanding reviews! You can sub turkey or even veggie crumbles for the ground beef! Kids can help make this dish and have fun doing it! This can also be made in a 9x13" pan. This is good frozen and microwaved. Great to take in your lunch bag, to a picnic, or to a tailgate party! Enjoy! A little history: The key to dating Shepherd's pie is the introduction (and acceptance) of potatoes in England. Potatoes are a new world food. They were first introduced to Europe in 1520 by the Spanish. Potatoes did not appeal to the British palate until the 18th Century. (Foods America Gave the World, A. Hyatt Verrill, page 28). Shepherd's Pie, a dish of minced meat (usually lamb, when made with beef it is called "Cottage Pie") topped with mashed potatoes was probably invented sometime in the 18th Century by frugal peasant housewives looking for creative ways to serve leftover meat to their families. It is generally agreed that it originated in the north of England and Scotland where there are large numbers of sheep--hence the name. The actual phrase "Shepherd's Pie" dates back to the 1870s, when mincing machines made the shredding of meat easy and popular."

Ready In:
1hr 10mins
Yields:
Units:

ingredients

directions

  • Preheat oven to 425 degrees F.
  • Spray a 12-count muffin pan with cooking spray. Mold biscuits to the shape of each muffin cup. Par-bake biscuits for 6 to 8 minutes until light golden. Remove from oven and set aside. You will probably need to smash them down with the back of a spoon.
  • Heat the 2 tbls. oil in a large skillet over medium heat. Add ground beef and brown. Stir in the onions, salt, pepper and garlic and allow to cook together for a couple of minutes.
  • Mix flour into the meat mixture and stir until a paste consistency is reached. Add beef stock to pan and stir in vegetables and herbs, the last few minutes, until combined.
  • Reheat mashed potatoes in a microwave for 5 to 6 minutes. Stir in granulated garlic and onion powder.
  • Spoon equal amounts (approximately 2 tablespoons) of warm potatoes on the bottoms of each par-baked biscuit. Then top with equal amounts of beef mixture (approximately 2 tablespoons). Finally top with equal amounts of Cheddar cheese.
  • Return to oven and bake for 12 to 15 minutes until cheese is melted and browned. Remove from oven and allow to cool slightly before popping individual pies out with a knife. Enjoy!
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RECIPE MADE WITH LOVE BY

@Sharon123
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@Sharon123
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"A great recipe from Aaron McCargo on Big Daddys' House. On Food Network, this recipe has 52 outstanding reviews! You can sub turkey or even veggie crumbles for the ground beef! Kids can help make this dish and have fun doing it! This can also be made in a 9x13" pan. This is good frozen and microwaved. Great to take in your lunch bag, to a picnic, or to a tailgate party! Enjoy! A little history: The key to dating Shepherd's pie is the introduction (and acceptance) of potatoes in England. Potatoes are a new world food. They were first introduced to Europe in 1520 by the Spanish. Potatoes did not appeal to the British palate until the 18th Century. (Foods America Gave the World, A. Hyatt Verrill, page 28). Shepherd's Pie, a dish of minced meat (usually lamb, when made with beef it is called "Cottage Pie") topped with mashed potatoes was probably invented sometime in the 18th Century by frugal peasant housewives looking for creative ways to serve leftover meat to their families. It is generally agreed that it originated in the north of England and Scotland where there are large numbers of sheep--hence the name. The actual phrase "Shepherd's Pie" dates back to the 1870s, when mincing machines made the shredding of meat easy and popular.""

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  1. stephlabovitz
    I used the Grand biscuits and used ramekins in order to have a little more room for filling. I did the parbake, but at 8 minutes the top edges were getting golden but the bottoms were still completely raw and had a puddle of oil, probably butter from the biscuits. I used the bottom of a quarter-cup measuring cup to press down the biscuits at that point and then put them back in the oven for about another 3-4 minutes which cooked up much better then. This had a great flavor. I did put the entire amount of seasonings and I'm glad I did. I was really annoyed by all the fussing with the small sizes but it really did turn out nicely and popped out of the ramekins easily and looked fancy :-) I'm tempted to retry this but use the biscuits to just line a pie plate instead of making individual cups. I'm definitely going to keep this recipe because it's the first shepherd's pie recipe that wasn't really bland.
    • Review photo by stephlabovitz
  2. stammerslynn
    This may or may not be a good recipe, however if you are using beef and not lamb it should be called a Cottage Pie. Cottage pies use ground beef, a Shepherds pie is made with lamb. Shepherds herded sheep not cows.
  3. Jeanne T.
    An ok recipe although I didn't use premade biscuits which aren't very good. But it is COTTAGE PIE not shepherd's pie. Shepherd's pie is made with lamb.
  4. 063015
    What a great recipe...the meat filling is outstanding....took them to a pot luck, they were the first thing eaten, even over the corned beef and cabbage. I will use regular size biscuits next time, grands were too much bread.
  5. Steven K.
    For those outside the US, a biscuit can be a variety of small baked goods with a firm browned crust and a soft interior. They are made with baking powder or baking soda as a chemical leavening agent rather than yeast, think very savory scones-ish haha. What recipe should be used for the biscuits??
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