Kumquat Marmalade

Kumquat Marmalade created by French Tart

I first heard of kumquats when I moved to Australia in 1982 -- and then I discovered that my neighbours had an abundant supply. Fruit shouldn't go to waste, so I adapted this recipe from 'The Complete Book of Fruit' by Leslie Johns and Violet Stevenson. I have successfully doubled and tripled this recipe, but you will probably need to cook it longer to reach the jelling point. Time does not include overnight standing.

Ready In:
1hr 45mins
Serves:
Yields:
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ingredients

directions

  • Slice the kumquats and put them in the water (in a pan that can be used on the stovetop). Let this stand overnight.
  • The next day, put the pan on the stovetop and boil the fruit until it is tender. Then pour the fruit mixture into a bowl and let stand for another night.
  • On the third day, transfer the fruit/water mixture to a cooking pot and add 1 1/2 cups of sugar. Add brandy if used. Boil this mixture until it jells (about 45 minutes).
  • Pour into warm, sterilised jars and seal. Or use a processing method you prefer.
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RECIPE MADE WITH LOVE BY

@Leggy Peggy
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@Leggy Peggy
Contributor
"I first heard of kumquats when I moved to Australia in 1982 -- and then I discovered that my neighbours had an abundant supply. Fruit shouldn't go to waste, so I adapted this recipe from 'The Complete Book of Fruit' by Leslie Johns and Violet Stevenson. I have successfully doubled and tripled this recipe, but you will probably need to cook it longer to reach the jelling point. Time does not include overnight standing."

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  1. jordanlevyross
    How long should this last in the fridge once opened? I made a jar last summer and it was delicious! But after a month or so, I noticed some the top of the marmalade was all white. Pretty sure it was mold and not crystallization...any ideas?
  2. Candice K.
    Stupid question, do you need to peel them first or use whole as is?
  3. Adrienne B.
    This recipe gets great reviews so I followed it even though I though there was too much water for the mix. The soak overnight and then cook, and then let stand overnight again was also puzzling to me but I did it. I should have followed my knowledge that it was too much liquid to ever jell because it did not jell. Also the Kumquats were so mushy by the time it was finished and it was a giant pot of syrup. Ordinarily I wouldn't care but separating seeds out of Kumquats took hours (they are the size of ants). If you want to make this reduce the water an forget the soaking, just cook and can it.
  4. Claire M.
    I quadrupled the recipe and it yielded nine 8 oz. jars. I boiled it until it reached 219 degrees with a digital candy thermometer. It took quite a while to reach the right stage. The taste is delicious as well as the texture. It did create a lot of foam to scrape from the top. I kept the mixture in the pot after boiling because there was no explanation why to remove from pot and put in a bowl then pot again.I did like brandy.
  5. Patricia B.
    Review by Patricia.B From Louisiana 1/2/2018 I have made this receipe several times this is a great receipe Peggy I'm confident to say it. I made it with brandy and with out brandy both ways are delicious. The only thing I did different was I chopped the kumquat in the water with my chopper. I find it helps with thickening of the kumquat marmalade my picture is the kumquat with the spoon on top of the jar it's delicious on toast, and bread and I found a delicious receipe to use called kumquat marmalade chicken wings glazed.
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