Jim Cohen's Sephardic Brisket

Entered for safe-keeping for ZWT. From "Jewish Cooking In America with Joan Nathan" by Maryland Public Television. Per one source, a pasilla chile is fresh, and called a chile negro if dried. In California, poblano chiles are also called pasilla chiles, if in error, but may be used in a pinch, and ancho chile peppers are dried poblano peppers. Use gloves when handling chiles, or you will be sorry. Serve with saffron rice, mashed potatoes, or couscous.

Ready In:
6hrs
Serves:
Units:

ingredients

directions

  • Soak the dried peppers in lukewarm water for 30 minutes. Seed, remove the stems and chop into tiny pieces.
  • Preheat the oven to 400 degrees F.
  • Season the brisket with the salt and pepper and dredge with flour. Heat the olive oil in a large heavy roasting pan and brown the brisket on all sides. Remove from the pan.
  • In the same pan, over medium heat, sauté the onions and ginger until the onions are transparent.
  • Add the pepper and deglaze with the orange juice. Reduce for a few minutes.
  • Add the brisket and enough stock or water to cover. Add the cinnamon stick, bay leaf and peppercorns.
  • Cook in the 400-degree oven, uncovered, until the brisket is tender, about 3 hours, turning at half hour intervals.
  • Remove the cinnamon stick and bay leaf.
  • Purée the sauce in a food processor or blender.
  • Cool and refrigerate a few hours or overnight. Remove the congealed fat that float on the top of the liquid.
  • A half hour before serving, bring about 4 cups water to a boil. Steep the tea bags in the water to make a strong tea. Discard the tea bags.
  • Put the prunes and apricots in the tea to plump for about half an hour. Then drain them.
  • Reheat the brisket, the sauce, and the plumped fruit.
Submit a Recipe Correction

MY PRIVATE NOTES

Add a Note
Advertisement
Enter The Sweepstakes
Advertisement

RECIPE MADE WITH LOVE BY

@KateL
Contributor
@KateL
Contributor
"Entered for safe-keeping for ZWT. From "Jewish Cooking In America with Joan Nathan" by Maryland Public Television. Per one source, a pasilla chile is fresh, and called a chile negro if dried. In California, poblano chiles are also called pasilla chiles, if in error, but may be used in a pinch, and ancho chile peppers are dried poblano peppers. Use gloves when handling chiles, or you will be sorry. Serve with saffron rice, mashed potatoes, or couscous."
icons / sparkles / sparkles

JOIN THE CONVERSATION

icons / sparkles / sparkles
icons / camera
upload
icons / star / star-outline
review
icons / write-a-review
tweak
icons / question
ask
all
reviews
tweaks
q&a
sort by: icons / navigate / navigate-down
  1. KateL
    Entered for safe-keeping for ZWT. From "Jewish Cooking In America with Joan Nathan" by Maryland Public Television. Per one source, a pasilla chile is fresh, and called a chile negro if dried. In California, poblano chiles are also called pasilla chiles, if in error, but may be used in a pinch, and ancho chile peppers are dried poblano peppers. Use gloves when handling chiles, or you will be sorry. Serve with saffron rice, mashed potatoes, or couscous.
Advertisement