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Grandma's Sourdough Biscuits

Grandma's Sourdough Biscuits created by Ruth S.

My grandma makes these every time we go over for dinner. I got my starter from her, so I too make these every couple weeks when I need to use up some starter. They are really fast and easy, and taste delicious right out of the oven.

Ready In:
22mins
Yields:
Units:

ingredients

directions

  • Sift together flour, salt, baking powder and baking soda.
  • Cut in the margarine or butter.
  • Mix in sourdough starter.
  • Turn out dough onto lightly floured board.
  • Knead a few times, until all of the flour is mixed in.
  • Pat/roll dough to 3/4" and cut out biscuits; place them on an ungreased baking sheet.
  • Bake at 425°F for 12-15 minutes, until slightly brown.
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@pollen
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@pollen
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"My grandma makes these every time we go over for dinner. I got my starter from her, so I too make these every couple weeks when I need to use up some starter. They are really fast and easy, and taste delicious right out of the oven."
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  1. jendowell
    Fantastic! First time making biscuits, won't be my last, and I'll never need another recipe! I baked 1/2 in a Breville toaster oven so raised the temp to 450. The other half I 'baked' in a cast-iron pan on med-low. Same timing, same great result. THANK YOU!
    Reply
  2. Jana C.
    I have made these several times with good results. Due to other comments below, let me specify a few techniques/ details: I use sourdough discard (I save extra starter in the fridge then just bring to room temp prior to use). My starter is 50/50 & always fed with whole wheat. If you have a different % water flour in your starter you will need to compensate one way or the other. Also, if using white flour instead of whole wheat, the starter will be more liquidy as well. The starter isn't a leavener per se, although will react with the baking soda to give some lift. To the person who used a complex method to cut in the butter to avoid grating - I never grated the butter. Just cut the cold butter into half inch cubes then use a pastry cutter, a couple of knives or just your fingers to work the flour in. I see lots of recipies that call for grating, but honestly, seems like a new fad to make something easy a lot more complicated!
    Reply
  3. cheapsuits
    Grandma's Sourdough Biscuits Created by cheapsuits
    Reply
  4. cheapsuits
    Just ate one that I pulled out of the oven. It was pretty good but slightly undersalted? I did a double batch and baked half in a 12" cast iron pan and the other half on a baking pan. I softened the butter and pressed it about 1/4" thick between two pieces of parchment, tossed it in the freezer and then used a pizza cutter to cut it into tiny cubes (I don't like using or washing cheese graters). My starter discard is pretty acidic and I was afraid it would be too strong but after baking it was fine and barely discernible. My normal method for biscuits is to use melted butter to baste but didn't get the color I wanted even after extending the baking time by 5 minutes. Next time I will try an egg wash. Quick an easy recipe and like others I picked it because I didn't have any buttermilk on hand. Sidenote: I live in Colorado and didn't make any altitude adjustments but I don't think it hurt the recipe.
    Replies 1
  5. Ani C.
    Since the recipe doesn't specify, I presume that this requires active starter as well as the other leavens? I'm a bit confused as I have seen many similar recipes using discard.
    Replies 1
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