Grand Marnier Cranberry Sauce With Oranges

"This recipe is my family's favorite recipe for cranberry sauce. It appeared in a local newspaper about 10 years ago and I have made it every year since then. I always make two sauces if I'm having more than 8 guests - the other is usually Cranberry Sauce with Pears and Cardamom, which is very different from this sauce and gives people a choice of very different flavors and textures. I've always used Grand Marnier instead of the other choices of orange liqueur or orange juice concentrate, although when it comes to the fruit, I've used Minneola (aka Honeybell) or Orlando Tangeloes instead of Naval oranges. Hope you enjoy this recipe as much as we do!"
 
Grand Marnier Cranberry Sauce With Oranges created by KK7707
Ready In:
30mins
Ingredients:
5
Yields:
3 cups
Serves:
6-8
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ingredients

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directions

  • Grate 2 teaspoons zest from the oranges and set aside.
  • Using a sharp knife, cut away and discard the thick white pith from the oranges. Carefully cut between the membranes to release the orange sections. Set the orange sections in a colander to drain off the excess juice. (If you add the juice to the pan, it will be too watery.).
  • In a medium, heavy-bottomed, nonreactive saucepan, combine the cranberries, sugar, water and the zest. Bring to a boil over medium heat, stirring often to help dissolve the sugar. Reduce the heat to low and simmer until the sauce is thick and the cranberries have burst, 10 to 15 minutes.
  • During the last few minutes, stir in the orange sections.
  • Remove from the heat and stir in the Grand Marnier.
  • Cool completely.
  • The cranberry sauce can be prepared up to 1 week ahead, covered and refrigerated. Serve at room temperature or chilled.

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  1. KK7707
    Grand Marnier Cranberry Sauce With Oranges Created by KK7707
  2. Sydney Mike
    One of the nice things about have a lot of bags of frozen cranberries year round is that I can make recipes like this anytime I like! Made this one as given, although I did add the Grand Marnier earlier so that the alcohol would cook off, leaving just the great flavor behind! Absolutely wonderful sauce, & a recipe that's a keeper, for sure! Thanks for sharing it! [Made & reviewed for one of my adopted chefs in this Spring's Pick A Chef event]
     
  3. iwannarowfast
    Very easy to make. I went ahead and completely removed the orange sections from the membranes, which was tedious, but when I added them in at the end, they broke up into nice little orange chunks. I also used Grand Marnier, and it turned out absolutely fantastic! The sauce is sweet, but not overpowering, and the flavors of the oranges and the cranberries fit together perfectly!
     
  4. KK7707
    This recipe is my family's favorite recipe for cranberry sauce. It appeared in a local newspaper about 10 years ago and I have made it every year since then. I always make two sauces if I'm having more than 8 guests - the other is usually Cranberry Sauce with Pears and Cardamom, which is very different from this sauce and gives people a choice of very different flavors and textures. I've always used Grand Marnier instead of the other choices of orange liqueur or orange juice concentrate, although when it comes to the fruit, I've used Minneola (aka Honeybell) or Orlando Tangeloes instead of Naval oranges. Hope you enjoy this recipe as much as we do!
     

RECIPE SUBMITTED BY

One of my passions is to feed people, but I wouldn't work in a commercial kitchen on a bet. It's too hard - and I have great respect for those who do it. I fix dinner for about 60 people once a year and am always looking for new recipes for "the party", which is what led me to this site. My husband and I also make and can jams (especially strawberry - plentiful in Florida, peaches, tomatoes and green beans, not to mention the annual cookie frenzy each December when we make about 75 dozen cookies for gifts. We also smoke salmon often. We love living in Florida, but miss the fine seafood, corn, tomatoes, peaches and apples of the mid-Atlantic coast.?Below I've?defined how I rate recipes to make my ratings more useful. I think this is important as I rely a great deal on ratings and comments by other Chefs and I would like to know what their standards are. How I rate recipes: 5 stars: These are recipes I expect to make many times and require little in the way of changes to be really, really good. This rating doesn't take into account as to whether a recipe is 'gourmet' or just plain good food - if I expect to make it often, it gets 5 stars. 4 stars: These are recipes that are very good, but for one reason or another I don't expect to make it often. The reasons for not making it often can be varied, such as difficulty or cost, but NOT because we just thought it was OK instead of great. These recipes are just as good as my 5-stars and are ones I would consider making again. 3 stars: These are recipes that one of my family or extended family liked or loved, but there wasn't a consensus that it was really good. 3 stars means I probably won't make again unless there are easy changes I can do to make it more to our liking. 2 stars: These are recipes that just aren't to my taste for one reason or another. Could be flavor, poor appearance, difficulty - just about anything. I don't plan to make it again. 1 star: These are recipes I didn't even end up serving to others and will not make again. Usually my problem with these recipes is with the taste. You won't find many of these ratings from me as it is sometimes kinder to just not rate it. If I do rate it, it is to make suggestions on how to improve it.
 
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