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Ethiopian Flat Bread (Injera)

This is an American adaption for Ethiopian Flat bread from "Extending the Table". I found this easy to make though it took a little time. Well worth it for the fun of an African finger-food meal... and tasty too! For more authentic Injera, add 1/2 c. teff flour and reduce whole wheat flour to 1/4 c. (NOTE: Use multiple frying pans to quicken the cooking task)

Ready In:
1hr 50mins
Yields:
Units:

ingredients

directions

  • Mix all ingredients in a large bowl.
  • Cover and let set an hour or longer until batter rises and becomes stretchy.
  • The batter can sit for as long as 3-6 hours if you need it to.
  • When you are ready, stir batter if liquid has settled on the bottom.
  • In blender, whip 2 c.
  • of batter at a time, thinning it with 1/2-3/4 c.
  • water.
  • Batter will be quite thin.
  • Heat a 10-inch or 12-inch non-stick frying pan over medium to medium-high heat.
  • Pour batter into heated pan (1/2 c. if using a 12-inch pan; 1/3 c. if using a 10-inch pan) and quickly swirl pan to spread batter as thin as possible.
  • Batter should be no thicker than 1/8 inch.
  • Do NOT turn.
  • Injera is cooked through when bubbles appear all over the top.
  • Lay each Injera on a towel for a minute or two then stack in a covered dish to keep warm.
  • (VERY important to rest on towel before stacking!) For those not familiar with Injera, serve it as the"utensil" when serving thick stews.
  • Use pieces of injera to scoop or pick up bites of stew-- no double-dipping-- eat your"utensil" each time.
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@luvinlif2k
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@luvinlif2k
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"This is an American adaption for Ethiopian Flat bread from "Extending the Table". I found this easy to make though it took a little time. Well worth it for the fun of an African finger-food meal... and tasty too! For more authentic Injera, add 1/2 c. teff flour and reduce whole wheat flour to 1/4 c. (NOTE: Use multiple frying pans to quicken the cooking task)"
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  1. SPrins
    Well, I've never had ethiopian cuisine before, but thought I'd give this a shot. Served it with Ethiopian Chickpea Wat from here on Zaar. It was definitely different, but since I have never had it before, I'm assuming it was similar to the real deal. Don't know if I'll make again, but it was definitely fun to try!! Thanks for sharing! :O)
    Reply
  2. liz.tarquin
    This is pretty close...I actually use rye flour instead of masa, as tef, the traditional Ethiopian grain, is a rye relative and we like the 'bite' it gives the bread. I have also had great luck halving or quartering the recipe - just make sure there's at least 1 tsp of yeast to every cup of flour.
    Reply
  3. liz.tarquin
    This is pretty close...I actually use rye flour instead of masa, as tef, the traditional Ethiopian grain, is a rye relative and we like the 'bite' it gives the bread. I have also had great luck halving or quartering the recipe - just make sure there's at least 1 tsp of yeast to every cup of flour.
    Reply
  4. Pierre Dance
    Excellent! I made these last evening to serve with, or should I just say "to serve" Ham Shanks & Pinto Beans. I thickened the beans with a bit of masa harina and served them in shallow bowls to make for easier scooping. I don't know if buttering these is authentic but it sure tastes good. Good companions, a pint or two or three of a locally brewed Pale Ale, it was Nervana or at least close to it. I'm trying to locate a source for teff flour. Thanx, Pierre
    Reply
  5. luvinlif2k
    This is an American adaption for Ethiopian Flat bread from "Extending the Table". I found this easy to make though it took a little time. Well worth it for the fun of an African finger-food meal... and tasty too! For more authentic Injera, add 1/2 c. teff flour and reduce whole wheat flour to 1/4 c. (NOTE: Use multiple frying pans to quicken the cooking task)
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