Essential Habanero Hot Sauce

"Planning to use this later this summer - I thought the water bath rationale & instructions were especially clear & easy to follow. From http://www.fiery-foods.com/dave/canning.asp: "Adjust the heat by adding fewer habaneros, not by increasing the carrots as this can alter the flavor & decrease the acidity. This version of the recipe is designed to be processed in a water bath... One way to avoid having to use a pressure canner is to can chiles along with high-acid vegetables or liquids. Two examples would be salsas and hot sauces. The addition of acidic ingredients will lower the pH of the mixture to the point that makes it safe to use the water-bath method of canning. In essence, to use this method, it is necessary to add vinegar, lemon juice, or lime juice in order to raise the acid level. If adding these ingredients raises the acid level to unpalatable levels, the amount of vinegar or lemon juice can be reduced, but the product must then be either pressure canned or frozen. Water-bath canning can be done in a special pot, or in any large metal container that is deep enough so that the water level will be at least 2 inches over the tops of the jars, and can boil freely. A rack of some kind in the pot is also necessary to keep the jars off the bottom of the pot during the vigorous boiling of processing. After the salsa has been prepared, it must reach boiling stage before simmering it for 5 minutes. Pour it into hot, clean jars, being sure to use all the liquid, which is the high-acid portion of the salsa. Put on the lids and process in the water-bath for 30 minutes. Add boiling water during the process to keep the jars covered. When the processing time is finished, remove the jars to a draft- free location to cool. The following tips apply to the water-bath method: equal parts of lemon or lime juice may be used to replace vinegar, if you so prefer. Less chile may be used in the salsas, but not more, since that will reduce the acid content of the final product. Additional salt may be safely added. Start timing the processing when the water starts to boil again, after adding the jars. And finally, additional seasonings such as oregano or cumin are best if added when serving the salsa, rather than before canning." The New Mexico Department of Agriculture Cooperative Extension Service has shared the following recipe for canning chiles by the water-bath method. ****NOTE******* This is rated "extremely hot" on their heat scale - I'll let you know after my habaneros ripen."
 
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photo by Natalie W. photo by Natalie W.
photo by Natalie W.
photo by stoermers photo by stoermers
photo by taviatkr photo by taviatkr
Ready In:
1hr 25mins
Ingredients:
7
Yields:
2 1/2 cups
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ingredients

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directions

  • Combine all the ingredients, except for the habaneros, in a saucepan and bring to a boil. Boil for 10 minutes or until the carrots are soft.
  • Place all the ingredients in a blender or food processor and puree until smooth. Strain for a smoother sauce.
  • Pour in sterilized jars and process in a water bath as described above.

Questions & Replies

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  1. nutridec
    How long did you process the jars? Thanks
     
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Reviews

  1. DianeRN in Neosho
    I make this for nephew in Iraq and he loves the stuff. I do not eat it but he gives it 5 stars. Going to make more soon and hope to ship it to him. I recently lost the recipe, thanks for posting.
     
  2. gahboo
    Quite nice. This is for folks who like heat. It is hot, but not harsh. Pretty strong vinegar bite. Be sure to cook carrots long enough or the texture is grainy. I canned this is 4 oz jars and BWB, it gets mellower with age. Make the recipe like stated, without seeds, and you can almost use this as a potent salsa - but that is a true spicy food freak talking there... It is pretty spicy. Definitely a repeat for me, and I might even change half of the carrots to red sweet bell peppers.
     
  3. stoermers
    This is my second time making this and I love this recipe. I tripled the recipe and processed 7 half pints and put aside a pint plus a little for the fridge. I did deviate from the recipe by adding a couple tablespoons of sugar per batch but other than that it is delicious. The carrot and the onions do a good job of toning down the habanero heat so it’s not too awfully hot.
     
  4. jcollins
    I haven't actually made this recipe yet, but I would like to give credit to its author. This recipe is copied verbatim from Dave DeWitt and Nancy Gerlach's "The Pepper Pantry: Habanero" published by Celestial Arts. To be fair, DeWitt and Gerlach call for "1 cup chopped habanero chiles, about 12 chiles" rather than the 10 peppers called for here. I would recommend the original book if you like spicy food.
     
  5. bdshore
    Needs less vinegar.
     
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RECIPE SUBMITTED BY

<p>First about Buster: Buster moved onto whatever comes next on February 26, 2008. He was just shy of five years old. I miss him terribly. <br />He came into our lives when he ran out in front of my car late one night as I was driving home. A just under 4 pound ball of kitten fluff, complete with an ostrich boa tail that stayed straight up as he assessed his new domain. He became a 19 pound longhaired beast who guarded our house (he followed any new guests or servicepeople the entire time they are on the property) &amp; even killed copperheads (among other things with his hunting buddy, Fergus the short-tailed)! Friends never saw his formidible side as he smiled at them &amp; uttered the most incongruent kitten-like mews as he threaded legs! He liked to ride in the car &amp; came to the beach. <br />There are Buster-approved recipes in my offerings - however, HE decided which he wanted to consider - Buster demonstrated he liked pumpkin anything - ALOT -LOL!!! <br /> <br />Copperhead count 2006 - Buster 2 <br /> (10 inchers w/yellow tails) <br /> 2007 - Buster &amp; Roxie 1 <br /> (a 24 incher!) <br />Buster woken from beauty sleep - <br />http://www.recipezaar.com/members/home/62264/DSCN0335.JPG <br />Big whiskers - <br />http://www.recipezaar.com/members/home/62264/DSCN0333.JPG <br /> <br />For those of you who gave kind condolences - thank you so very much. <br />http://www.recipezaar.com/bb/viewtopic.zsp?t=250301 <br /> <br /> <br />I love to cook &amp; incorporate techniques from Southern/Mid Atlantic roots (grits, eastern NC BBQ shoulders, Brunswick stew, steamed crabs &amp; shrimp &amp; shellfish, hushpuppies, cornbread, greens, shad roe, scrapple) with Pacific Rim foods &amp; techniques aquired while living in Pacific Northwest, fish &amp; game recipes learned while living in Rocky Mountain region &amp; foods/techniques learned travelling to the Big Island &amp; up into BC &amp; Alberta &amp; into the Caribbean. The Middle Eastern/African likes I have are remnants of my parents who lived for many years in North Africa &amp; Mediterranean before I was thought of. Makes for wide open cooking! <br /> <br />Since moving back east we try to go annually in the deep winter to Montreal (Old Montreal auberges &amp; La Reine) &amp; Quebec City (Winter Carnival &amp; Chateau Frontenac)- for unctuous foie gras &amp; real cheeses, French &amp; Canadian meals prepared &amp; served exquisitely, fantastic music &amp; wonderful people - with the cold helping burn off some of the calories! <br /> <br />I love putting in our aluminum jonboat &amp; heading across the Intracoastal Waterway (ICW) to the barrier islands for foraging &amp; exploring! Bodysurfing is a lifelong sport for me - one that a person's body never seems to forget how to do, once the knack is learned (thank goodness!) <br /> <br />I especially miss cool summers &amp; foggy/drizzly days &amp; fall mushroom foraging/anytime of year hot springing in WA, OR, MT, ID, BC &amp; Alberta.</p>
 
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