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Corn Oysters

Corn Oysters created by Nimz_

From America's Best Lost Recipes, cookbook. Corn oysters date back to the late 1800s'. Some of the early recipes were made with "Indian" green corn and the taste was thought to resemble that of oysters. When these fritters hit the hot oil, the batter sputters and invariably a stream of ot trails behind, making them look even more like fried oysters. According to Lois, whose family settled in Maryland in the 1600s, "this recipe is the original and makes truly tender, full of corn flavor, delicate corn oysters."-Lois Blumenthal,York, Pa.

Ready In:
30mins
Serves:
Units:

ingredients

directions

  • Grate the kernals from the cob into a medium bowl using the large holes of a box grater. Using the back of a knife, scrape any pulp remaining on the cobs into the bowl with the grated corn. Stir in the flour, cornstarch, eggs, salt, and remaining baking powder until well blended.
  • Heat the oil in a Dutch oven over medium heat until it registers 350 degrees. Carefully drop 13 to 15 heaping T of batter into the hot oil and fry, turning once, until the corn oysters puff and are golden brown on both sides, about 2 minutes. Transfer to a paper-towel-lined plate. Add more oil to the pot if necessary and heat to 350 degrees. Repeat with remaining batter. Sprinkle the corn oysters with salt. Serve immediately.
  • NOTE FROM TEST KITCHEN: Use only fresh corn for this recipe-frozen corn is too dry to produce a creamy batter. Be sure to keep temperature at 350, too low and the oysters become sodden with oil, too high and they become too dark before they are done.
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"From America's Best Lost Recipes, cookbook. Corn oysters date back to the late 1800s'. Some of the early recipes were made with "Indian" green corn and the taste was thought to resemble that of oysters. When these fritters hit the hot oil, the batter sputters and invariably a stream of ot trails behind, making them look even more like fried oysters. According to Lois, whose family settled in Maryland in the 1600s, "this recipe is the original and makes truly tender, full of corn flavor, delicate corn oysters."-Lois Blumenthal,York, Pa."
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  1. Nimz_
    Corn Oysters Created by Nimz_
    Reply
  2. Nimz_
    These were very good. I've never had corn oysters before. I used some of my frozen corn on the cob which might have caused the need to increase the flour and cornstarch to get my batter to the right consistency that I thought should be like hush puppy batter. I only used 1 teaspoon of salt which seemed plenty for us. Thanks for sharing ro. Made for WTTM :)
    Reply
  3. mightyro_cooking4u
    From America's Best Lost Recipes, cookbook. Corn oysters date back to the late 1800s'. Some of the early recipes were made with "Indian" green corn and the taste was thought to resemble that of oysters. When these fritters hit the hot oil, the batter sputters and invariably a stream of ot trails behind, making them look even more like fried oysters. According to Lois, whose family settled in Maryland in the 1600s, "this recipe is the original and makes truly tender, full of corn flavor, delicate corn oysters."-Lois Blumenthal,York, Pa.
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