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Champorado (Filipino Chocolate Rice Porridge/Pudding)

From Manila Spoon. A classic Filipino breakfast, this version is a little richer than the usual champorado. You may serve it more as a dessert rather than as breakfast. The rice used is malagkit, which is a sweet glutinous or sticky rice. Unfortunately, this site will not accept that as an ingredient. Instead of just using water to cook the rice, this uses a combination of coconut milk and fresh 2% milk. Evaporated milk, which is more readily available in the Philippines, is fine too. If you wish to have this for breakfast, use only half of the coconut milk plus some water as stated in the recipe. But if it will be used as dessert, then go ahead and use the entire can and leave out the water for a much creamier version. Traditionally, it is eaten as breakfast with dried salted fish.

Ready In:
1hr
Serves:
Units:

ingredients

directions

  • In a large deep pan, mix all the ingredients except for the sugar and, bring to a quick boil. Stir to incorporate the chocolate powder and to prevent rice from sticking to the pot. Once it has boiled, lower the heat and bring to a simmer.
  • Stir once in a while and cook until rice is tender. It may take up to 25-30 minutes for the sticky rice to cook. It doesn't cook as fast as regular rice.
  • When the mixture becomes a bit dry and the rice has not softened yet, you may pour in more milk or water, as needed, until the rice is fully cooked and the desired consistency is reached. See below. I prefer a thicker porridge rather than a watery one.
  • Add the sugar and mix it inches Try the champorado and adjust the taste to your liking.
  • Serve in individual bowls with additional milk on the side.
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RECIPE MADE WITH LOVE BY

@JackieOhNo
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@JackieOhNo
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"From Manila Spoon. A classic Filipino breakfast, this version is a little richer than the usual champorado. You may serve it more as a dessert rather than as breakfast. The rice used is malagkit, which is a sweet glutinous or sticky rice. Unfortunately, this site will not accept that as an ingredient. Instead of just using water to cook the rice, this uses a combination of coconut milk and fresh 2% milk. Evaporated milk, which is more readily available in the Philippines, is fine too. If you wish to have this for breakfast, use only half of the coconut milk plus some water as stated in the recipe. But if it will be used as dessert, then go ahead and use the entire can and leave out the water for a much creamier version. Traditionally, it is eaten as breakfast with dried salted fish."
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  1. JackieOhNo
    From Manila Spoon. A classic Filipino breakfast, this version is a little richer than the usual champorado. You may serve it more as a dessert rather than as breakfast. The rice used is malagkit, which is a sweet glutinous or sticky rice. Unfortunately, this site will not accept that as an ingredient. Instead of just using water to cook the rice, this uses a combination of coconut milk and fresh 2% milk. Evaporated milk, which is more readily available in the Philippines, is fine too. If you wish to have this for breakfast, use only half of the coconut milk plus some water as stated in the recipe. But if it will be used as dessert, then go ahead and use the entire can and leave out the water for a much creamier version. Traditionally, it is eaten as breakfast with dried salted fish.
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