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Authentic Polish Paczki

Authentic Polish Paczki created by Agnes W.

This is the recipe I found handwritten in my Polish grandmother's cookbook. I have since found ones almost identical in Polish cuisine cookbooks. I so looked forward as a child to the Sundays that the Catholic church in Wilno, Minnesota sold paczkis after Mass on Sundays. They were the best treat ever. This recipe takes some effort, but they taste just as good. *NOTE....I'm adding this change after reading the last reviewer's very helpful comment that it tasted too eggy...she's right, it's a very eggy pastry dough. Be sure to use 6 whole eggs instead of the 12 yolks if you don't like that flavor (I know many people don't). It will work just as well, but be more to your taste. I'm so glad she took the time to bring this to my attention....it's something I should have mentioned before.

Ready In:
1hr 30mins
Yields:
Units:

ingredients

  • 12 egg yolks (or six whole eggs, see note)
  • 1 teaspoon salt
  • 2 (1/4 ounce) packages active dry yeast
  • 14 cup warm water
  • 13 cup room temperature butter
  • 12 cup sugar
  • 4 12 cups flour
  • 13 cup rum or 1/3 cup brandy
  • 1 cup scalded whipping cream
  • 1 12 1 1/2 cups cooked apples or 1 1/2 cups poppy seed filling
  • oil (for deep frying, The old-timers used lard, but vegetable oil will work(I use peanut oil.)

directions

  • Beat egg yolks with the salt in the small bowl of an electric mixer at high speed until the mixture is thick and piles softly, about 7 minutes.
  • Soften yeast in warm water.
  • Cream butter, add sugar to it gradually, beating until fluffy.
  • Slowly beat in the softened yeast.
  • Stir one fourth of the flour into the yeast mix.
  • Add rum/brandy and half of the cream.
  • Beat in another fourth of the flour.
  • Stir in remaining cream.
  • Beat in half of the remaining flour and then the egg yolk mixture.
  • Beat for 2 minutes.
  • Gradually beat in the remaining flour until the dough blisters.
  • Cover the bowl with plastic wrap.
  • Set in a warm place to rise.
  • When it has doubled in bulk, punch it down.
  • Cover and let rise again until doubled.
  • Punch it down again.
  • Roll dough on a floured surface to about 3/4 inch thickness.
  • Cut out 3 inch rounds using a cookie cutter or glass.
  • Put 1 tablespoon of filling in the center of half the circles.
  • Brush the edges with water.
  • Top with the remaining rounds.
  • Seal the edges very well.
  • Cover the paczki on a floured surface.
  • Let rise about 20 minutes.
  • Deep fry in the hot fat until they are golden brown on both sides.
  • Sprinkle with powdered sugar or drizzle with honey.
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RECIPE MADE WITH LOVE BY

@Vina7737
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@Vina7737
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"This is the recipe I found handwritten in my Polish grandmother's cookbook. I have since found ones almost identical in Polish cuisine cookbooks. I so looked forward as a child to the Sundays that the Catholic church in Wilno, Minnesota sold paczkis after Mass on Sundays. They were the best treat ever. This recipe takes some effort, but they taste just as good. *NOTE....I'm adding this change after reading the last reviewer's very helpful comment that it tasted too eggy...she's right, it's a very eggy pastry dough. Be sure to use 6 whole eggs instead of the 12 yolks if you don't like that flavor (I know many people don't). It will work just as well, but be more to your taste. I'm so glad she took the time to bring this to my attention....it's something I should have mentioned before."
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  1. tammi_jordan
    I had never made Paczki before and chose this recipe because it’s traditional. I have to agree with Booboo13 that the dough is far too soupy. I thought maybe it would tighten up as it rose, but that was not the case. In the end I worked in a little extra flour during the rolling out stage and patted the dough out (too loose to roll). When they rose after shaping, they just spread out, so they’re huge. I think the rum may be the main culprit. This recipe is similar enough to others I found with the exception of the rum. In most recipes it’s a tsp, not 1/3 cup. The flavor is awesome, but I can’t swear it’s correct. I’m a southern girl who never had these befor. I was trying to re-create childhood memories for my husband from Milwaukee.
    Reply
  2. Booboo13
    I've made paczkis before this with another recipe. I wanted to try this one as it seemed more traditional. This dough is way too soupy as I think the flour ratio is way off. Added at least one more cup and I will repost after all is said and done. Has anyone found this problem?
    Reply
  3. sun_9557
    The reason the recipe doesn't sound like a recipe for poonchki, is because you may be thinking of kolaches. both can contain prune filling, but the poonchkis are filled like doughnuts, and the kolaches are more of an open filled cookie. Both are wonderful! : )
    Reply
  4. Karen H.
    The packaging is deceptive. It reads RASPBERRY FILLED. THERE ARE NO RASPBERRIES IN IT, ONLY A SYRUP. I would never have tried them if I knew it was only a syrup filled pastry. Definitely not worth the calories. A waste of money
    Reply
  5. Robin A.
    pjkobulnick is exactly right - this recipe is way more complex than necessary and is essentially a brioche dough, one of the easier yeast doughs to succeed at if you're new to yeast doughs. The trick is to proof the yeast to get it going (mix in about quarter cup of warm water with a bit of sugar and let sit for 10 min), and then to mix the wet ingredients with most of the flour and beat like mad for 20 minutes if you've got a strong arm or a Kitchenaid mixer. If you have time, it's best to refrigerate for a couple of hours before rolling and cutting. I usually make the dough late in the day and refrigerate overnight, but it's not necessary. I agree that the filling should be added after cooking and cooling. One reviewer seemed to imply that yeast is killed by cooling. It isn't, though it might go dormant. Heat kills yeast, so that's why you proof in warm and not hot water.
    Reply
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