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    124 Recipes

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    I know that garam masala recipe often vary family to family and region to region. I couldn't say where this one is specifically from but it comes courtesy of the fabulous Madhur Jaffrey, her World of the East Vegetarian Cooking book. This is quite heavy in cardamom, so if that's not a flavour you enjoy, this might not be the mix for you. Note that when it says cardamom seeds, that doesn't mean the pods, it means the seeds inside.

    Recipe #395197

    From what I've read on numerous websites, the 'Perfect Storm' cocktail is really just a variation of the classic and simple 'Dark & Stormy'. There are many many versions of the Perfect Storm out there, but I like the simplicity of this one. Cut back on the Grand Marnier to 1 oz and you won't notice the difference. You could also sub ginger ale in place of ginger beer, but I've recently discovered that it's just not the same...there is a spiciness and flavour to ginger beer that is so much nicer. Instead of that bottled lime juice, I use a few healthy wedges of fresh lime. Cheers!

    Recipe #471030

    This is just a little recipe off the side of a box of silken tofu (Mori-Nu). I didn't care for the entire recipe, which involved broiling the tofu...far too much effort to put the oven on when you're planning to stir fry. What I did like about the recipe was the sauce - quick and simple for those days when you don't have time to mess around with too many ingredients, but still don't want to open up a packaged sauce. You can thicken up the sauce if you choose, or add some heat if that's what you're going for. As this has honey I can't say it's vegan, however I think you could sub agave or some other sweetener quite nicely (brown rice syrup??). Let me know if you try that. The original recipe said it was enough for 4, but if I was making it for 4 adults I would probably double it which is why I said it serves 3. Enjoy!

    Recipe #396036

    Chia apparently absorbs about 9x its weight in water. It becomes jello-like and makes a great egg replacer. This recipe is meant to replace one egg. Use it in the same way you would use a "flax egg" in vegan baking. I have read on various blogs that the neutral flavour of chia is preferred over flax. There should be no need to grind the seeds first (as you do with flax), I suppose if you were in a hurry though, it would "gel" more quickly if you did.

    Recipe #422264

    There is a lot of information out there about Chia seeds (Salvia) and what a nutritional powerhouse they are. I'm trying to find new ways to incorporate them into my diet, aside from sprinkling them on breakfast cereal. Recently my health food store handed out a few recipes including chia seeds, which is where this one stems from. I'm no expert but I do know they are high in omega-3, fibre, calcium and protein. I know of vegans using chia seeds soaked in water in place of eggs (or in place of "flax" eggs). I'm planning to post a recipe for chia egg replacer shortly. This page has lots of great information about these seeds - http://www.living-foods.com/articles/chia.html. I halved the original recipe, since these seeds are expensive I didn't want to risk it. If you don't happen to have coconut oil (aka coconut butter), I think it would be fine to leave it out because there is enough oil in the tahini and almond butter to hold things together. These make a fantastic snack.

    Recipe #422262

    Sometimes you just want a simple, good sandwich that doesn't involve faux deli slices. I keep a tin of chickpeas on hand for just such occassions, and never make it exactly the same way twice...but this is generally a combo of ingredients and flavours I enjoy. I also like to add in a bit of flax oil, just to get my omegas in. Served on some toasted bread, this is a quick and satisfying lunch.

    Recipe #453045

    A famous vegetarian restaurant in Vancouver (the Naam) makes an amazing Dragon bowl stir fry with loads of tofu and veg and an amazing sauce. I think there are lots of versions of the dish out there, but one of the best I ever found was posted on www.thestraight.com, originally from 'Ripe From Around Here'. This is my adaptation, a few other favourite ingredients thrown in and lighter in oil. Serve over hot rice and steamed veg or some tofu. I like to stir fry veg and udon noodles in about half of the sauce, and then toss in the remaining sauce when done. Some recipes include less tamari and use miso. Lots of variations you could do, and lots of ways to use it.

    Recipe #449347

    There are a million versions of spicy peanut sauce - this is just another take on an old (?) favourite. It uses vinegar which I like because I don't always have citrus on hand. My 3 year old loves this (go figure), it's just the right amount of spice for him - so of course you might want to beef up the chili. I also went pretty light on the sesame oil to try and save some calories...all in all it's pretty tasty and super easy! In my photo I had stir-fried it with some buckwheat noodes, bok choi, broccoli and some other veg. Note that it only makes 1/2 a cup, about enough for 2.

    Recipe #413912

    Homemade tartar sauce is quick and easy. I prefer to mix mine up so it's smooth, as opposed to the chunky sort you buy - but your choice of course. I made this one day to go with #216544 and it makes more than enough for 8 people (and we like sauce!).

    Recipe #368916

    Lovely raw vegan pesto, which doesn't contain any oil. Toss with your favourite pasta or use as a spread. If using over pasta I like to use some olive oil. This recipe calls for fresh parsley, cilantro & spinach - but sub basil for any of these, or double up on one if you happen to have a big supply of one or the other. Found in Alive's July 2010 magazine, which they paired with a raw zucchini pasta. You can also freeze prepared pesto in ice-cube trays or flattened out to 1/4" thickness.

    Recipe #431880

    This recipe came together from a few different recipes, and from having tried a number of varieties over the years. I generally use dry chickpeas that have been soaked and cooked - of course you could use tinned, which I think gives you about 1 1/2 cups when drained - so if you're using canned just adjust the water accordingly to get the consistency you want. For the garlic, if you don't have any roasted heads ready to go, you could also saute garlic to mellow it out (rather than use raw). I like to throw a few heads of garlic into the oven whenever it's in use for something else - saves using all that energy for just garlic when you need some. (Note...prep time doesn't include cooking the chickpeas or roasting the garlic..).

    Recipe #420705

    Came across this recipe in July's Alive magazine, who needs bottled dressing when you can put this together in a matter of a few minutes. This pairs nicely with quinoa salad or any crisp green salad.

    Recipe #431876

    Came by this on veganyumyum.com - and it lives up to the website's name. This really is a quick one, not fancy by any means, but I think it's tastes pretty fantastic. Apart from a bit of fresh lemon juice and garlic, these items are pantry staples for most vegetarians or vegans. You want to be careful not to overcook the sauce. I found the flavours were better raw, much more mellow when I had cooked it with some leftover pasta. So I'd recommend really gently heating the sauce. If you're looking for a really traditional "cheesy" sort of flavour, keep in mind this won't be exactly it, but it is savory and cheese like....I guess as cheesy as you get vegan wise. Well, you know what I mean. Enjoy!

    Recipe #403282

    This is really quick and easy, one pot side dish which I love. The original recipe apparently called for sugar, which I left out because I find the coconut milk adds plenty of sweetness. I came across this on the "One Hot Stove" blog, originally from Cook's Illustrated. This uses one of those small tins of coconut milk. If you need extra liquid you could add more coconut milk, or a little broth.

    Recipe #476446

    A very simple side salad which would go nicely alongside a curry and rice. There isn't much to this, the beauty is in its simplicity. According to the Int'l Vegetarian Union, this is a Swahili recipe, common in Kenya & Tanzania. (www.ivu.org)

    Recipe #456927

    This is a very healthy, live food recipe with nut protein, EFAs and veggies. Use as a sandwich spread or thin it out slightly to make it a dip. As a filling you can roll up in lettuce leaves or spread into celery sticks. The recipe originates from Alive Magazine. It made a huge amount so I cut the recipe in half. As this is "live" food it does not keep, you need to eat within 24 hours or it begins to ferment. Perfect time to pull out your seed sprouter and make your own lentil or other sprouts - or you can usually buy a variety of sprouts in your local produce store. A food processor is the best tool for this, in order to get a true pate consistency. I have made it in my blender, which worked but I had to add some water to help things along so it was more like a hummus consistency. I am also editing to include about a tsp of tamari/soy/braggs as an option. I found it needed it an extra boost of seasoning.

    Recipe #455016

    Also from Moosewood's book. Easy and simple. Could also be used as a marinade for fish. I plan to use for a simple, crisp green salad, with some apple and cucumber thrown in. You can make this quite a ways in advance.

    Recipe #371561

    Found this in Alive's July 2010 magazine. They called it a spring salad, but it screams summer to me when I can (hopefully) pick fresh cukes, peas, peppers and onions from the garden or local farmers market. I'm always looking for ways to use quinoa, have tried this using red quinoa for something different. It worked well except that I find the red quinoa is easy to overcook, so keep an eye on it. Pair this with Recipe #431876, or another simple dressing. This calls for 3 cups of cooked quinoa, which is easily done, I use Jubes' Recipe #235534. Be sure to rinse your quinoa really well to remove its bitter outer layer. It makes a pretty big bowl full which I think would serve 8 easily as a side dish. I found that the dressing more or less disappears if you leave it too long so I suggest not tossing it until you're ready to eat. And if you're only using half the batch, just toss half. The quinoa part keeps well but after a day in the fridge I could barely detect the dressing.

    Recipe #431877

    This recipe is one of my first experiments making a vegan "cheese" style sauce. It is from "How it all Vegan", which is such a fabulous book. When I first made it, I misread and used sunflower seeds instead of sesame - and now I'm not sure which version I like better. If you're wondering, the consistency is similar to hummus, and if you've never made one of these so-called "cheeses" don't expect it to be like the dairy cheese you know, it's quite different. Great, different. Note that this makes quite a bit - the recipe says 1 cup, but I'd say it's close to 2. So if you're using this as a sandwich spread, that's quite a bit to go through unless you try freezing (I haven't tried that yet). According to the book it should last 7-10 days. Having said that, if you've got people over - put this out with some crackers and it won't last long!

    Recipe #400300

    From Veg Times, this recipe calls for Napa cabbage (aka Chinese cabbage). Nice change from lettuce, and for those who don't care for the usual coleslaw, this one has a distinct Asian flavour with the sesame oil, ginger and soy. Lots of room to add more veggies as you wish! UPDATE: I was able to make this in advance for a party by mixing up the dressing a few days in advance and storing in a tightly sealed jar in the fridge. The night before, I cut up all the veg, including the cilantro and put it all in a plastic bag. A few hours before we were due to eat, I tossed it all together. It worked out really nicely. I also used regular cabbage and it was still great. If you like dressing I suggest doubling that part, you can always keep extra for another meal if you don't use it all.

    Recipe #411003

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