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    33 Recipes

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    This is the recipe I use with my pasta machine. It has never given me a problem and never ever sticks. Credit goes to Joy Davies from her book Noodles and Pasta.

    Recipe #480492

    2 Reviews |  By chefRD

    Instructions are for a Big Batch of Marinara Sauce utilizing a huge can of Nina San Marzano Tomatoes 106 ounces which you can purchase for less than four dollars at Costco. The price of yearly membership is worth it just to be able to buy these cans of tomatoes. When you open up this can look at how beautifully bright red the tomatoes are. Also, note that there is a nice beautiful tomato sauce not a watered down version like you find in most canned tomatoes. After I tried the San Marzano tomatoes I couldn't go back to regular canned tomatoes. This is a very flavorful simple marinara sauce. I usually make up a batch when I'm making lasagna and then the extra sauce goes into the freezer to use later. Don't rate this recipe negatively if you choose to make it with other types of tomatoes rather than San Marzano. I have received so many complements on my sauce. Try this you won't be sorry. Credit for this recipe goes to: pasta-recipes-by-italians.com

    Recipe #480491

    From America's Test Kitchen I was skeptical about this recipe at first, but since I've made this now twice I know the method of exracting the juice from the banana's and reducing the liquid is the best way to make banana bread. Give this a try just once. It's has just two extra steps but well worth the little bit of extra work! From America's Test Kitchen: Why this recipe works: Recipes for ultimate banana bread abound, but because they include an overload of bananas for flavor, the bread’s texture is often soggy. We wanted a moist, not mushy, loaf that tasted of banana through and through. To impart lots of banana flavor, we needed to use a generous amount of bananas, but we needed to rid them of excess moisture. We turned to the microwave to help us out. We piled as many bananas in a bowl as we dared and zapped them in the microwave. Then we drained the now-pulpy fruit and mixed the fruit into a batter. We didn’t want to toss the flavorful liquid, so we reduced it and added it into the batter as well. Like a mock extract, our reduction infused the bread with ripe, intensely fruity banana flavor. With the flavor problem solved, a few minor tweaks completed the recipe: We exchanged the granulated sugar for light brown sugar, finding that the latter’s molasses notes better complemented the bananas. Swapping out the oil for the nutty richness of butter improved the loaf further. We also added toasted walnuts to the batter, finding that their crunch provided a pleasing contrast to the rich, moist crumb. Wondering if the crust might benefit from a little embellishment, we sliced a banana and shingled it on top of the batter. A final sprinkle of sugar helped the buttery slices caramelize and gave this deeply flavored loaf an enticingly crisp, crunchy top.

    Recipe #480129

    1 Reviews |  By chefRD

    This is a dense cake which is very buttery and a lovely almond flavor. Especially good with frosting and can support fondant. I use Marshmallow Fondant which you can make at home and tastes superior to the pre-made fondant. I'm listing the ingredients for the almond buttercream frosting, however I personally prefer to still use Buttercream Icing I recipe, which is my favorite. I have made the soaking syrup without the Brandy when I made this cake for my daughter's birthday and it was still delicious. ***Just a few thoughts on ingredients: I personally feel if I'm making from scratch to buy a good quality extract, I use a Bourbon Vanilla from Madagascar and only use Pure Almond Extract. Be advised that Almond Extract is a strong flavor, so use less if you prefer or halve it with Vanilla extract. I also never use butter with salt in it. Look for unsalted butter or sweet cream butter. I would prefer to control the amount of salt in my recipes. Happy Baking!

    Recipe #475190

    1 Reviews |  By chefRD

    Peggy's Baking Corner by Peggy Weaver There are many versions of “Buttercream” icing. Some are made with eggs and all butter. Some varieties, you have to cook your sugar to a softball stage. Others are 100% shortening or a combination of shortening and butter. Each decorator has his or her favorite. I personally think that the best taste and textured recipe is the one that has you cook your sugar, add to whipped eggs and use pounds of butter per batch. BUT…. I live in a state that can easily be a 100 degrees for days on end during the summer and you know what butter does on hot days. It melts! A greasy puddle of melted icing on a cake plate is not something I want to look at or eat. Your top notch decorators have a few options we don’t. They have huge refrigerators to store their cakes in, and refrigerated vehicles that they can use to deliver decorated cakes. I even know a few that refuse to deliver at all. If you want their cake, you come and get it and it’s your responsibility if it melts. These decorators don’t even turn on their ovens for a wedding cake for less than $2000. -------------------------------------------------------------------------------- The following recipes for Buttercream Icing hold up pretty well in the heat and humidity, but if you know that your cake will be out in very high temperatures, then don’t use any butter and use only a high quality shortening. Shortening: Solid Shortenings definitely have their place in baking. So I’m going to talk taste tests. Crisco is the hands down winner. It has a clean taste with the melting point of 106 degrees. Butter melts somewhere between 88 and 98 degrees F. depending on the amount of fat in the brand. You can see that if you need to serve a pure buttercream decorated cake, on a hot August afternoon, you could have melted roses (and I do mean greasy puddles) on the tablecloth. This is when a good quality shortening will be a great blessing. I have been told by decorator friends that some of the warehouse brand shortenings leave a grainy consistency to the icing no matter what you do. Powdered (Confectioner's) Sugar: Regarding Powdered Sugar. Please use a Cane Sugar. I prefer C&H Powdered (confectioners) Sugar. Many of the cheaper brands use sugar beets for their base. I don’t know the chemistry behind it but you definitely get different textures to your icing that can vary from batch to batch. I spent a few months being very frustrated with the quality of my icing until a kind lady did a bit of trouble shooting for me. She recommended the cane sugar and I’ve been blessing her ever since. Top-Quality Brands: Please be safe, buy a quality brands and then stick with it for the best results. A friend of mine, who is a wonderful cook and baker, travels a lot and she often prepares treats for her hosts. She’s learned to ask the host to have her favorite shortening and flour on hand. She has even made up a little makeup type case that carries her favorite extracts and precious spices. That way she knows what she is working with, how it handles, and what tastes she can expect for the finished product. Some surprises are NOT pleasant. Storing Buttercream Icing: If you are not going to be using the icing right away, place it in a clean, sealable bowl. Store it in the refrigerator but please don’t place it next to the marinating salmon, garlic or broccoli. You do NOT want those flavors in your icing! I like to use my icing within a few days but it will hold in the cold refrigerator for a couple of weeks if necessary. I often make a double batch of icing the night before I have a baking project. That way I know that I have plenty of icing, it’s fresh and I don’t have to make it while I’m in the middle of baking the cakes. The extra can always be used for a batch of cupcakes. When you remove the icing from the refrigerator, you might notice that the icing has taken on a sponge like texture. Do yourself a favor and place the icing in a bowl and mix by hand using a back and forth, smashing motion with a spoon or icing spatula. What you want to do is to smash the bubbles out of the icing. This extra step will help to give you the smoothest icing for a pretty top and sides of the cake. I have found that you will get an even better texture of icing if it is at room temperature before you try to do your icing. Bad Buttercream Icing Days: One thing that seems very silly but is true. There are Bad Buttercream Days! I’ve asked quite a few decorators about this and every one says “Yes, there are lousy days”. I’m not sure what causes the problem. It could be that every human has bad days so they blame the buttercream. It may be the humidity or that there is a low pressure system hanging over your town. I just know why but it is a perceived fact. The way I have handled the problem is that I changed the decoration on the cake. I couldn’t get the smooth top or sides as I originally planned. Writing a greeting on a messy top would look awful so I changed the design idea and put flowers everywhere. I could have also done a basket weave technique around the sides. Just go with the flow, and don’t get frustrated. Aunt Martha won’t chuck the cake at you if you don’t write her name on the top this time. Remember that you are creating something that is to be eaten so have fun with it. Different Mixers: If you have a heavy duty counter mixer, you can prepare a whole batch at one time. If you are using a hand mixer, divide the recipe in half. If you notice the mixer getting hot, please stop and let the machine cool off. I also prefer to mix the buttercream on a low setting. It seems that the higher setting do the job faster but you also will get a spongy texture to the icing. I don’t want that quality in my final ice coating or flowers on the cake. Using Weight Scales: 1 cup of Crisco weighs 6 ounces. I put a piece of wax paper on my scale and start plopping spoons of shortening on until I get the desired weight. It really saves on the cleanup.

    Recipe #334135

    5 Reviews |  By chefRD

    This wonderful icing is used for icing cakes and cookies as well as for borders and art work on cakes. It makes a delicious filling also between the layers of cakes and under Fondant Icing. You can make roses but it takes 3 or more days to dry them depending on the humidity. There are many versions of “Buttercream” icing. Some are made with eggs and all butter. Some varieties, you have to cook your sugar to a softball stage. Others are 100% shortening or a combination of shortening and butter. Each decorator has his or her favorite. I personally think that the best taste and textured recipe is the one that has you cook your sugar, add to whipped eggs and use pounds of butter per batch. BUT…. I live in a state that can easily be a 100 degrees for days on end during the summer and you know what butter does on hot days. It melts! A greasy puddle of melted icing on a cake plate is not something I want to look at or eat. Your top notch decorators have a few options we don’t. They have huge refrigerators to store their cakes in, and refrigerated vehicles that they can use to deliver decorated cakes. I even know a few that refuse to deliver at all. If you want their cake, you come and get it and it’s your responsibility if it melts. These decorators don’t even turn on their ovens for a wedding cake for less than $2000. The following recipes for Buttercream Icing hold up pretty well in the heat and humidity, but if you know that your cake will be out in very high temperatures, then don’t use any butter and use only a high quality shortening. Shortening: Solid Shortenings definitely have their place in baking. So I’m going to talk taste tests. Crisco is the hands down winner. It has a clean taste with the melting point of 106 degrees. Butter melts somewhere between 88 and 98 degrees F. depending on the amount of fat in the brand. You can see that if you need to serve a pure buttercream decorated cake, on a hot August afternoon, you could have melted roses (and I do mean greasy puddles) on the tablecloth. This is when a good quality shortening will be a great blessing. I have been told by decorator friends that some of the warehouse brand shortenings leave a grainy consistency to the icing no matter what you do. Powdered (Confectioner's) Sugar: Regarding Powdered Sugar. Please use a Cane Sugar. I prefer C&H Powdered (confectioners) Sugar. Many of the cheaper brands use sugar beets for their base. I don’t know the chemistry behind it but you definitely get different textures to your icing that can vary from batch to batch. I spent a few months being very frustrated with the quality of my icing until a kind lady did a bit of trouble shooting for me. She recommended the cane sugar and I’ve been blessing her ever since. Top-Quality Brands: Please be safe, buy a quality brands and then stick with it for the best results. A friend of mine, who is a wonderful cook and baker, travels a lot and she often prepares treats for her hosts. She’s learned to ask the host to have her favorite shortening and flour on hand. She has even made up a little makeup type case that carries her favorite extracts and precious spices. That way she knows what she is working with, how it handles, and what tastes she can expect for the finished product. Some surprises are NOT pleasant. Storing Buttercream Icing: If you are not going to be using the icing right away, place it in a clean, sealable bowl. Store it in the refrigerator but please don’t place it next to the marinating salmon, garlic or broccoli. You do NOT want those flavors in your icing! I like to use my icing within a few days but it will hold in the cold refrigerator for a couple of weeks if necessary. I often make a double batch of icing the night before I have a baking project. That way I know that I have plenty of icing, it’s fresh and I don’t have to make it while I’m in the middle of baking the cakes. The extra can always be used for a batch of cupcakes. When you remove the icing from the refrigerator, you might notice that the icing has taken on a sponge like texture. Do yourself a favor and place the icing in a bowl and mix by hand using a back and forth, smashing motion with a spoon or icing spatula. What you want to do is to smash the bubbles out of the icing. This extra step will help to give you the smoothest icing for a pretty top and sides of the cake. I have found that you will get an even better texture of icing if it is at room temperature before you try to do your icing. Bad Buttercream Icing Days: One thing that seems very silly but is true. There are Bad Buttercream Days! I’ve asked quite a few decorators about this and every one says “Yes, there are lousy days”. I’m not sure what causes the problem. It could be that every human has bad days so they blame the buttercream. It may be the humidity or that there is a low pressure system hanging over your town. I just know why but it is a perceived fact. The way I have handled the problem is that I changed the decoration on the cake. I couldn’t get the smooth top or sides as I originally planned. Writing a greeting on a messy top would look awful so I changed the design idea and put flowers everywhere. I could have also done a basket weave technique around the sides. Just go with the flow, and don’t get frustrated. Aunt Martha won’t chuck the cake at you if you don’t write her name on the top this time. Remember that you are creating something that is to be eaten so have fun with it. Different Mixers: If you have a heavy duty counter mixer, you can prepare a whole batch at one time. If you are using a hand mixer, divide the recipe in half. If you notice the mixer getting hot, please stop and let the machine cool off. I also prefer to mix the buttercream on a low setting. It seems that the higher setting do the job faster but you also will get a spongy texture to the icing. I don’t want that quality in my final ice coating or flowers on the cake. Using Weight Scales: 1 cup of Crisco weighs 6 ounces. I put a piece of wax paper on my scale and start plopping spoons of shortening on until I get the desired weight. It really saves on the cleanup. Recipe from Peggy at WhatsCookingAmerica.net

    Recipe #334113

    2 Reviews |  By chefRD

    Delicious, hearty soup full of cabbage, carrots, ground beef and onions. Tomato base and just the right amount of spices. Wonderful served with crusty home-made bread. Try with Rye Bread!

    Recipe #286011

    4 Reviews |  By chefRD

    From my favorite dessert cookbook: "Gooey Desserts-The Joy of Decadence" by Elaine Corn She states: My mother goes to conferences now and then with my father. When the men sequester themselves, she and some other spouses attend cooking classes. During one such confab in New Orleans, she took a class from Joe Cahn at the New Orleans School of Cooking, and brought home this incomparable recipe. My friend Kathleen, who is also my chief bread-pudding tester, warns anyone who has just partaken of this dessert to wait a while before driving. "God forbid you might have to take a Breathalyzer test! Whew!

    Recipe #285479

    (Andrea's Truffle Torte) From my favorite dessert cookbook: "Gooey Desserts-The Joy of Decadence" by Elaine Corn. Elaine writes, "This is one of the most defiantly gooey desserts anywhere. We are not talking light and airy. We are not talking tender crumb. From my friend Andrea, what we really have here is a big batch of frosting. Two-thirds of it bakes into cake. The rest acts truly as frosting." Put the deliverance on the plate you intend to keep it on. Truffle torte sort of lodges on the surface it sticks to first.

    Recipe #285430

    Rich Gravy and Full of Flavor with the addition of Ale. Dumplings are light and fluffy! One of the best stews I've ever eaten and very comforting on a cold winter's night!

    Recipe #285370

    Why is there vinegar in the cupcake batter? Baking soda, the ingredient that makes these cupcakes rise, starts to work only when it comes in contact with an acidic ingredient. Some common types used in baking are lemon juice, buttermilk and vinegar. Sweet balsamic vinegar, which has a flavor that goes well with the rich flavor of cocoa, is added to the batter here. It gives these cupcakes a deep, full flavor. Surprisingly, they wont taste anything like vinegar after the batter is baked. Adapted from Williams-Sonoma Sweet Treats, by Carolyn Beth Weil (Simon & Schuster, 2006). From Cooking with Kids.

    Recipe #285317

    This lasagna includes three types of Italian cheesesricotta, mozzarella and Parmesan.Adapted from Williams-Sonoma Fun Food, by Stephanie Rosenbaum (Simon & Schuster, 2006). From Cooking with Kids.

    Recipe #285313

    3 Reviews |  By chefRD

    This simple sandwich makes the perfect lunch or afternoon snack. From Williams-Sonoma Cooking with Kids;Adapted from Williams-Sonoma Fun Food, by Stephanie Rosenbaum (Simon & Schuster, 2006).

    Recipe #285311

    From Williams-Sonoma Cooking with Kids- Adapted from Williams-Sonoma Kids Baking, by Abigail Johnson Dodge (Oxmoor House, 2003). Eat this pancake while its still warm and puffy!

    Recipe #285305

    This is an advanced recipe for kids to prepare. It is well worth the effort to create a delicious home-baked cake for a birthday celebration! From Williams-Sonoma Cooking with Kids;Adapted from Williams-Sonoma Kids Baking, by Abigail Johnson Dodge (Oxmoor House, 2003).

    Recipe #285210

    1 Reviews |  By chefRD

    A layer of cheese sauce makes these sandwiches extra-good! There are more sandwich ideas at the end of this recipe. From Williams-Sonoma Cooking With Kids Adapted from Williams-Sonoma Fun Food, by Stephanie Rosenbaum (Simon & Schuster, 2006).

    Recipe #285206

    8 Reviews |  By chefRD

    I found this on a blog on the internet site I can do that. This is a recipe that author "Oggi" adapted from Gordon Ramsay's show "Kitchen Nightmares" where he tried to save the restaurant. This recipe ended up being the signature dish of the restaurant.

    Recipe #283311

    My absolute favorite pierogi filling! In fact, I remember us kids fighting over the sauerkraut filled pierogi's. The younger children's favorite is usually the farmers cheese filling. I prefer not to have mushrooms in my sauerkraut filling, but am listing it in the ingredients as optional. These recipes came from a newspaper clipping from 1981 from my mom.

    Recipe #280300

    2 Reviews |  By chefRD

    This is a filling for Pierogi's. This is absolutely my young daughter's favorite filling. The cheese used for this filling is white, semi-dry, and crumbly like feta cheese.

    Recipe #280298

    Being part Polish on my mother's side of the family, of course I have my favorite Polish recipes! I just loved when my mom made stuffed cabbages growing up. Here is one of the many stuffed cabbage recipes I've collected. This one comes from a newspaper clipping my mom saved years ago dated 1981.

    Recipe #280290

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