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    You are in: Home / Wylder's Public Recipes
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    25 Recipes

    Sort by: Newest | Rating | Photos | Time to Make | A-Z

    3 Reviews |  By Wylder

    I love squash. I tossed together this veggie concoction and man is it good. I am a vegan, so I have been testing new ideas for recipes. It's super simple and tastes great.

    Recipe #385286

    1 Reviews |  By Wylder

    Saniyit Kufta also referred to as minced or ground beef patties, baked, is a traditional Egyptian recipe for a classic baked beef patty cooked in a large dish which is sliced into squares and topped with tomatoes. The full recipe is presented here and I hope you enjoy this classic Egyptian dish.

    Recipe #363249

    This simple Egyptian cookie is made of flour, sugar, and butter or oil and then baked.

    Recipe #363225

    A medieval beer bread recipe. Definately a time consuming process, seeing as to how it calls for ingredients from brewing your own ale. This recipe is said to be a German bread recipe. The original recipe made eight loaves. I revised it to four loaves. You may change it to suit your needs as well. This bread was a bread made for feasts. Note that this bread doesn't take as long to make as it does to proof.

    Recipe #361923

    1 Reviews |  By Wylder

    An Andalusian style meatball from the 13th century.

    Recipe #361828

    Many medieval recipes call for spice mixtures without detailing the exact spices. While it is tempting to assume that each particular spice mixture had a consistent recipe, there is evidence of substanial variation for different times, regions, budgets, and cooks. The recipe below is for one of the more commonly called for spice mixtures. I strongly encourage altering it to suite your own tastes.

    Recipe #361717

    This recipe has earned a gold star in my personal cookbook. Not only is it a vegetable dish that most people seem to like, it travels well in a cooler, it can be served cold, and it's tidy enough to be eaten without utensils. Best of all, with a couple of changes it becomes incredibly easy to make and still retains its medieval flavor. Since beet leaves aren't available at the local grocery, I normally use only spinach.

    Recipe #361677

    This is a rather odd dish. It seems to be a sort of bread pudding to be served during lent (no eggs or dairy products).

    Recipe #361674

    This pudding has a texture resembling applesauce and has an absolutely fabulous grape-wine flavor that is very rereshing.

    Recipe #361668

    The dish called Blancmanger in the middle ages was not much like the modern dessert of the same name. This dish, a slightly sweet casserole of chicken and rice, was served all across Europe and appears in just about every medieval cookbook. While often described as being suitable for the infirm, it still found its place on the menus of coronation banquets and wedding feasts.

    Recipe #361665

    Many medieval recipes call for spice mixtures without detailing the exact spices. While it is tempting to assume that each particular spice mixture had a consistent recipe, there is evidence of substanial variation for different times, regions, budgets, and cooks. The recipe below is for one of the more commonly called for spice mixtures. I strongly encourage altering it to suite your own tastes.

    Recipe #361647

    Many medieval recipes call for spice mixtures without detailing the exact spices. While it is tempting to assume that each particular spice mixture had a consistent recipe, there is evidence of substanial variation for different times, regions, budgets, and cooks. The recipe below is for one of the more commonly called for spice mixtures. I strongly encourage altering it to suite your own tastes.

    Recipe #361645

    This recipe was served by Kristen Sullivan at the Marche of the Unicorn's Newcomer's Feast in the fall of 2006. The use of cinnamon, ginger, and cloves as spicing for meat dishes was very common in medieval England, making this dish a perfect introduction to medieval European cuisine.

    Recipe #361642

    This is such a simple dish and so suited to the modern palate that just about everybody and their cousin has their own version.

    Recipe #361634

    1 Reviews |  By Wylder

    While this recipe is far from exciting, it is simple to make and just about anyone will like it.

    Recipe #361626

    The result of this recipe is a wonderfully flavored roast, though it is slightly on the peppery side. If you are not especially fond of pepper, reduce the amount from 1 tsp. to 1/2 tsp.

    Recipe #361608

    Most of the pie crust recipes from 15th century are tacked on to the end of the recipe for some kind of pie filling. They're usually very simple mixtures of flour and water, and often don't call for any fat. This 16th century recipe is one of the earliest that is strictly for making short crust pastry. The addition of eggs and saffron give it a wonderful flavor.

    Recipe #361576

    This dish looks very similar to any number of Indian recipes, small chunks of meat in a reddish-brown gravy. The fact that I tried it served over rice most likely added to this mental association. At a proper medieval dinner though, this would have most likely been served in a bowl over bread or toast.

    Recipe #361570

    These "Medieval Meatballs" are a perfect buffet or party dish. The meat and sauce both have just enough spice to notice, but not so much as to be overpowering. They're also very easy to make. Note that the sauce recipe makes way more than enough for double the number of pumpes.

    Recipe #361567

    Modernly, beer-batter fried apple slices seem like something one might find at a state fair, but in the middle ages this recipe was found in the cookbooks of the nobility.

    Recipe #361559

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