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    746 Recipes

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    Got to cooking & this one had to be written down - DELICIOUS! Mildly spicy, sweet & tangy - Da Bomb!

    Recipe #494393

    Came up with this one to break in the new (to us) 1950's electric ice cream maker we scored. Have some bananas that needed to be used so here's what we came up with. The secret is dropping the banana into the custard to release all that banana tastiness & then adding the banana chunks in the final minute or two of churning to leave tasty chunks of banana. Serve with http://www.food.com/recipe/wet-walnut-topping-33474 and http://www.food.com/recipe/grams-hot-fudge-sauce-216793 - so folks can add as much as they want. Plan to make again with 1/2 teaspoon of nutmeg & grilled pineapple with the wet walnuts. Mmmmm! Prep time doesn't include chilling the custard or ripening ice cream. Cook time doesn't include churning because ice cream makers vary - our cranks this out in 20 minutes.

    Recipe #434834

    Came up with this low sugar recipe after being overwhelmed by light & heavy syrups while canning whole figs. Lots of figs around here now - free for the picking as not too many folks eat them anymore (Whaaaat?). It has a bright fresh flavor - when DH taste tested he ate all the extra from the first batch (about a 1/2 cup overage). Ordinarily he is a taste & go kind of guy so I knew it was good. I use the extra pectin as I like a firmer set. Leave out the extra pectin if you want a softer set (low sugar pectin seems to set softer for me). I added the extra lemon juice (bottled for the standardized pH) for safety's sake. No point in making the stuff just to get knocked off by it. The lemon definitely enhances.

    Recipe #433406

    From the UW Extension Service. I plan to make using rice wine vinegar (5%) & diced crystallized ginger & lemon - omitting the other spices except perhaps for a pretty little fish pepper in each jar. Will also ice & salt the cantaloupe with pickling salt before dousing with the hot vinegar. **Select cantaloupe that are full size but almost fully green and firm to the touch in all areas including the stem area.

    Recipe #433090

    The figs are coming in & wanted a recipe to preserve their summery goodness. I keep these in the fridge for now but will try to can at some point. I use these for Fig Upside Down Cake, alongside vanilla ice cream, mixed into homemade vanilla & lemon gelato, on greek yogurt for breakfast & right out of the jar just because they are so good!

    Recipe #432403

    Lots & lots of male squash blossoms, basil & sweet golden cayenne peppers coming in are the basis of this version of fried squash blossoms. Chilling the batter seems to help the final product (light crispy tempura like) so I mix it up first and then mix the stuffing and trim the blossoms. Be sure to get that oil up to 350 degrees - hot. Test fry a piece of bread - should brown up in 10 seconds or less. Be sure to use enough so that the blossoms float versus sit on the bottom - keeps them from getting greasy. I use peanut oil - has a high smoke temp (unlike olive or other vegie oils) & a neutral flavor (at least to us). This recipe doubles & triples well but remember - these have to be cooked & served immediately to fully enjoy them. I am going to experiment with stuffing & chilling the blossoms along with the batter - do some tableside frying to entertain friends. They really look gorgeous & taste even better.

    Recipe #432005

    Plan to use some of those fresh berries that are waiting in the fridge. Breakfast, brunch, snacks... Received in an email from gourmet-recipes-from-around-the-world. Attributed to : A Taste of Canada-Rose Murray.

    Recipe #431083

    Received in an email from Ben T via gourmet_recipes_from_around_the_world. These sound delicious & worth messing with the casings. Posting for use in the fall/winter. Total guess on yield until I make it. You may be able to get your butcher to do the grind for you if you do not have a meat grinder. Then the only challenge would be stuffing the casings.

    Recipe #420483

    Got this on a card - right before Easter. Timing is everything! If the glaze tastes too tart I plan to add an equal amount of reduced orange juice with plenty of orange zest.

    Recipe #417236

    This is Lynne Rossetto Kasper's takeoff on a dish by Paris chef Guy Martin. Found in The Seattle Times. Plan to make for guests coming in on Good Friday - will serve with hot buttered egg noodles and bright green lightly steamed turnip greens... ah, the South!

    Recipe #417152

    Received this lovely recipe in an email from gourmet_recipes_from_around_the_world ( thank you Bjorn Holstrom). Prunes with pits intact are becoming difficult to find in the litigious US. Pity as the pits have a delicate almond-like essence to their kernels. Using hot water to plump the prunes will decrease the 12 hour (interpret as overnight in my book) soaking time as will using pitted prunes (which can melt if let to soak beyond 15 to 30 minutes in hot water). I love the use of canned almond paste in this recipe - use your favorite crust if this one seems a bit spartan. I certainly would use chilled fat of choice & chill whatever dough I was using after shaping into a round - seems to yield a better crsut.

    Recipe #416419

    Received in an email from Pete Walley via gourmet_recipes_from_around_the_world. Sounds like a beautiful thing to use some of my many pints of fig preserves in! Can't wait to try (but will wait until my poor old mouth is healed up).

    Recipe #416417

    This sounds so good for my tender mouth. Found it in The Seattle Times (LOL) who attribute it to being from From "Macaroni & Cheese" by Marlena Spieler. My tender tooffs thank you Marlena. If this keeps up I'll have to be buying your book.

    Recipe #415512

    Received in email from Herbivoracious.com. Can't wait to try it out! Created by Michael Natkin. Link to original recipe: http://www.herbivoracious.com/2010/02/thai-tofu-salad-recipe.html

    Recipe #415253

    Received this intriguing recipe from AJ on gourmet_recipes_from_around_the_world. I plan to make them when the wet weather clears so I can use the deep fat fryer on the daeck - oh, & have friends over to eat these! Think these will make an outstanding breakfast with strong coffee (& chai tea for the coffee hater) before a day of winter fishing! Thanks AJ! You will need oil for frying that has a high smoke point - we always use pure peanut oil.

    Recipe #409832

    This recipe was a spur of the moment when I needed to cook up a mighty big Costco package of super lean ground beef. I made several dishes & this was the star - so much so DH kept saying, "Now where did you get this really good sausage?", as he went for this soup. He asked for it again, soon, so I reckoned I had better write it down. The spice from the meatballs really nicely permeated the soup. Gets better the next 2 days - beyond that I dunno as it is tee totally gone. Will try it with diced canned tomatoes next. FTR I used freeze dried onion & corn from Honeyville Grains - same measurements ( http://store.honeyvillegrain.com/freezedriedvegetables.aspx ) - I am really enjoying their freeze dried vegetables & steel cut oats. Do chill the meatballs & broth - this enables one to really reduce the fat content but doesn't sacrifice the flavor at all. I think I am going to make a triple batch & freeze the meatballs in broth - eliminating the chilling part of the preparation. Double it & freeze one - it's that good.

    Recipe #408716

    Chow.com sent me an email showing their way to bake a sweet potato. When I read how they cut the skin BEFORE cooking it I cringed. Wash them, keep the skins intact & roast them so their natural sugars caramelize inside the skins. When done there is a palpable gap between the parchmenty skin & the wonderful tater innards. The first compound butter is adapted from Chow.com - the next two are our own. We eat sweet potatoes all winter long (great vitamins & satisfy our sweet tooths) usually with dark green vegies like home canned collards, home grown kale, spinach or cabbage, so having an assortment of butters in the fridge makes a simple meal special. The butters are enough for about 12 servings altogether but keep very well if not exposed to air in the fridge. I put ours in small ceramic containers & then in Ziplocs (labelled). Sweet potatoes roast well tucked near a bed of coals (if you are camping or having a bonfire) & do well if you are BBQing - I always cook at leasst a half dozen when smoking pork shoulders as they reheat so nicely for lunches & that smoky taste is awesome with the sweet potato.

    Recipe #407927

    Brought by DF who plans to make it with leftover turkey. The recipe called for using rotisserie chicken but any leftover roasted chicken will likely do. We both plan to add the cheese on top to individual bowls rather than cooking in as the directions seem to suggest.

    Recipe #406526

    Chocolate... espresso.... cookie.... Couldn't pass this recipe up when finding it in The Washington Post. Adapted from a recipe by Rachel Thebault, owner and head confectioner of Tribeca Treats in New York City. Saving for making later (still awash in Christmas cookies here! LOL). I like to make the dough & refrigerate - then scoop what I want & re-fridge the rest for fresh cookies another time. Hope these will work that way - bet they will. Chocolate... espresso....

    Recipe #404966

    Fast, tasty, healthy... what more do you need? Using this as a quick side for roast pork to balance out the Christmas cookies. LOL Received in an email from gourmet-recipes-from-around-the-world. Thanks, Pete!

    Recipe #404335

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