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    156 Recipes

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    My Dad is very fond of a creamy sesame dressing found in Japanese restaurant near him and has asked me if I can come up with something close to it. I tasted it, tasted it, and tasted it and came to a conclusion that it's a commercial based salad dressing with raw eggs, very sharp vinegar taste reminiscent of kewpie mayonnaise taste and something else I could not pinpoint. That salad dressing is good, but when you taste it by itself, I realize there were lots of stablizers, preservatives, and chemical taste that I did not like. But still, I had to come up with something for Dad because he was paying $5 for a cup of this dressing and he was going through it quickly. This is my rendition and I think much tastier one that I am proud of. You can easily grind roasted sesame seeds in coffee grinder for 1 second or you can mortar and pestle. It should only be partially ground

    Recipe #252395

    This sauce is found in many teppanyaki style Japanese steak houses in the U.S. I first had this type of cooking in Okinawa in the late 60's and fell in love with the sauce. I tried different versions of this mustard sauce, and after numerous attempts, came up with this version I like the best. This sauce goes well with grilled teppanyaki style meats and seafood.

    Recipe #185716

    This recipe comes from one of my very favorite American chef, Paul Prudhomme and is posted here on request. I love all his recipes I've tried and none ever disappointed me.

    Recipe #297404

    This salad dressing comes from Sam Choy, one of my favorite Hawaiian chefs along with Alan Wong and Roy Yamaguchi. The dressing is good just as it is, but you can also use this dressing as a jumping off place for improvising such as addition of garlic, hot pepper, etc. Ono good!

    Recipe #283887

    This is one of my main stand ins during winter months when I crave slow cooked flavors of beef. Horseradish and hint of curry may sound strange, but these two flavors go extremely well together. This recipe is not a beef curry recipe. Instead, a small amount of curry is used as a backdrop flavoring only....just a hint of curry and not meant as a curry dish. I love this simple rustic dish. It is a bit Asian and mostly Western inspired. Do not use Asian/Korean style thin beef short ribs used mainly for quick grilling. Although other cuts of beef will work (cubed), beef short ribs is best for this recipe. This recipe will work really well in crock pot too.

    Recipe #187310

    You find this type of salad dressing in many Japanese restaurants in the U.S. I used to see people requesting something similar often, so I created this around mid to late 90's. If this dressing is too tart for your taste (it will water down with salad greens) add 1-2 T water to the dressing.

    Recipe #187180

    In the past most chicken karaage (Japanese style fried chicken) recipes were marinated chicken pieces which were deep fried and simply served. Now in Japan, fried chicken karaage recipes often come with different sauces or relishes. One of my favorite is onion sauce, but this one is equally good. If difficult to get leg sections, boneless thighs work very well too. Make several small cuts (not skin side) to flatten the thighs so they lay flatter.

    Recipe #205621

    Very quick and delicious preparation for gai lan or kai lan. Gai lan is sometimes referred to as Chinese broccoli. The stalks are thinner than regular broccoli and as a bonus you also get to eat beautiful yellow gai lan flowers that are often bundled together. This dish is often served at dim sum restaurants. Cooking time is very, very quick and should not be overcooked.

    Recipe #377778

    My version of Salisbury steak with a bit of heat. You can omit hot pepper sauce if you are not into heat or have children who do not like spicy food.

    Recipe #269679

    From Bobby Flay and Hellman's. Added ingredients and cleaned the instructions.

    Recipe #376569

    I really respect Iron Chef Chen as a chef. He seems to be a wonderful mentor to many young chefs working under him. He caught my attention as a Iron Chef Chinese on Iron Chef TV program and really enjoyed watching him improvise many recipes. I learned a lot just by watching and copied many of his ideas from the show that I now incorporate into my cooking repertoire. Since then, I've looked for his cookbooks and found 4 in Japanese language. I love all his recipes, especially his famous Mapo Tofu or Mapo Doufu. His dad was a pioneer in introducing Szechuwan cooking to Japanese and he is known as a father of Mapo Doufu in Japan because he was apparently the first Chinese man to cook something so spicy as this dish in Japan. It is now very famous in Japan and Iron Chef Chen Kenichi continues with that tradition at his restaurants in Japan. I wish Chinese and Japanese sauces and other culinary ingredients are known in the West for their proper Chinese and Japanese names like most Indonesian or Malasian sauces ie sambal olek etc instead of using generic names such as bean sauce, etc because it can get very confusing using those generic names. For this dish, you need two Chinese sauces/pastes http://www.foodsubs.com/CondimntAsia.html#bean%20sauce. The first one is Chinese brown bean sauce/paste aka tenmienjan, tenmenjan, or tenmenjiang - it's made from soy beans and sometimes is called Chinese miso type sauce or sweet noodle sauce. It is dark brown in color and has a wonderful dark miso type flavor. The next sauce is Chinese chili bean sauce aka toubanjan or doubanjiang - it has soy beans along with hot chilies and is red color. Don't use regular hot red chili sauce since it lacks the complexity of soy beans found in hot bean red chili sauce. The other two Chinese ingredients you will need for this recipe are fermented black beans (you can usually find these bagged and are ready to use or in bottles) and Szechuwan peppercorn. Szechuwan pepeprcorn is optional though Chef Chen does use it. Chef Chen uses regular tofu (not firm or silken) for his recipe. If you cannot find green garlic chives also known as nira in Japanese, I would use combination green onion and garlic. You want the taste of garlic as well as color of green onion for this dish. Another item that he uses is Japanese chili pepper known as ichimi tougarashi ie crushed or minced red pepper and if you cannot buy this item easily, I would substitute by mincing Chinese, Japanese, Thai, or Korean dry red pepper. This is a very, very spicy version of Mapo Tofu and if you like, cut down on chili pepper and chili oil if you like this recipe milder. However, this dish goes so well with plain steamed white rice that you can eat and eat while your nose is running. I plan to post another of Chef Chen's milder Mapo Tofu recipe using Hoisin sauce in the future.

    Recipe #296880

    In Japan, barbecue is popular. It is however different from the American style barbecue. Beef, pork, chicken are usually thinly sliced for quick grilling and are grilled indoors. The diners sit around the table with the grill in the middle and pieces are quickly grilled and eaten at the table a few pieces at a time. This type of barbecue is called yakiniku which translates to grilled meat. People outside of Japan are sometimes familiar with yakitori, a skewered chicken pieces, usually marinated and grilled. If you cannot find mirin easily, substitute sake or sherry with a bit of honey.

    Recipe #305009

    A very simple recipe using my favorite food, soy sauce, for marinating boiled eggs. You can eat these eggs simply sliced or whole. I admit, I love these eggs served simply or in ramen and have them often in my refrigerator for a quick snack. If you like you can add many other ingredients to the marinade such as garlic, gochujang, miso, tobandjan, tenmenjan, tabasco or other hot sauces. These eggs are often served in ramen in Japan. For an authentic Japanese ramen style eggs, boil for 6-7 minutes only for softer yolk.

    Recipe #315722

    I clipped this recipe from a magazine almost 40 years ago (started collecting recipes in my teen years). I must have made this recipe at least zillion times (LOL) and that's how much I love this recipe. Since my first introduction to Swedish meatballs through this recipe, I've tried many different variations. Some I like a lot like that one from Aquavit by Marcus Samuelsson and others, well, they were one time only recipes. But, I keep coming back to this recipe when I want Swedish meatballs. I kept it as -my own- secret recipe, but it's time to share with everyone. Hope you enjoy! Goes really well with egg noodles. Note: if you don't have fines herbs, just use any combination of herbs. I use Kitchen Bouquet for liquid gravy seasoning, but if this is not readily available, you can use other gravy seasoning. If you don't have green scallions, you can use all dill. The taste of dill is important in this recipe. The earlier version had chives and dill but since most people no longer keep chives, this recipe was changed to green scallions and dill.

    Recipe #252498

    My all-time favorite hamburger patty for making American style burgers. I found the original recipe in the Better Homes and Gardens Barbecue Book back in the 70's and this is the only recipe I ever use. It has been modified somewhat, but it retains most of the original ingredients. I always have a bottle of chili sauce in the refrigerator at all times for making these. Although you can perhaps substitute ketchup for chili sauce the taste will not be the same. You need to mix this meat mixture thoroughly. I use circular motion to get fat from ground beef and egg emulsified. The original recipe is for 4 hamburger patties but I usually make 5 patties because I like my patties smaller than quarter pounder.

    Recipe #277747

    I learned how to make this during my chef assistant days at Draeger's Cooking School. This is a very different salsa because it uses a potato. Please use waxy white potato, Yukon, or red potato for this dish.

    Recipe #288521

    In Japan, tempura over rice is simply called tendon. It's a shortened word for tempura donburi. You can certainly use any veggies, herbs, fish, seafood for the topping. Normally, large shrimp along with several varieties of vegetables are made into tempura. I like using shiso leaves. Shiso is sometimes called perilla in English and is often used in sushi restaurants - looks like big leaves somewhat similar to large basil leaves but with more texture. I love the taste of shiso and although some people compare shiso leaves to mint, I don't find them similar. Some of the vegetables you can use for tempura include (but not limited to) Japanese eggplant, sweet green Japanese pepper called shishito, kabocha pumpkin, onion, carrots, zucchini, shiso leaves, mushrooms, shitake mushrooms, sweet potato, potato, green beans, and leafy veggie, etc. I am revising this recipe to change the batter ingredients to US measurement for easier preparation. .

    Recipe #305012

    This was originally known as Morgan Hill Garlic Mushrooms, but since more people are familiar with Gilroy name from the annual Gilroy Garlic Festival in Gilroy, CA I am posting with the Gilroy name. This was from 1979 contest and oh so good. Marinated mushrooms became very popular in the late 1970's and this is a wonderful recipe highlighting both garlic and mushrooms.

    Recipe #315763

    My very favorite stroganoff. The original recipe came from Ruth Mellinkoff's "The Uncommon Cook Book". The original recipe uses beef tenderloin, but to economize I use NY steak or beef sirloin (choice cut) .

    Recipe #270170

    This is one of the finest garlic soups I've tasted. It is from Jose Andres.

    Recipe #370354

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