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    57 Recipes

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    I'm posting this recipe because my FIL's second wife has had great success with it. Whether it's the placebo effect or whether it actually works, it has brought this dear woman, a former operating room nurse, some relief and she doesn't doubt its efficacy. Her comment to me was really interesting; she said that she didn't realize how much it was helping her until she wasn't able to have her drunken raisins during a vacation. By the end of three days without the raisins, her knees, which had been doing well, were swollen and very painful. Your mileage may vary. Researching the origins of the recipe, it was apparently first described by Paul Harvey in the 1990s. As with any home remedy, consult your doctor and use common sense when using this. Preparation time does not include the time that it takes for the gin to evaporate.

    Recipe #236772

    Quick salad dressing recipe...posted upon request. I've seen this with the addition of a little bit of white miso, so you may want to experiment with this.

    Recipe #83366

    Recipe #83369

    It's not necessarily FOR carrots, it's made WITH carrots!

    Recipe #166472

    In the Japanese language, the characters for "wafu" are East-West. This dressing is a western-style cream based dressing with an eastern flair...hence it is known as a "wafu dressing" or "East meets West Dressing." In short, this is a Japanese-esque recipe for salads and dipping that I've been making for over 20 years. For some reason, most savory wafu recipes (dressing or not) combine the flavors of soy and sesame oil. I actually like the combination here! The original recipe calls for making the mayonnaise from scratch and then adding the other ingredients. I prefer making this using commercial mayo because I the kids will go through quarts of the stuff on their salad. I usually double the recipe to last us a week. It's almost a crime, but very tasty to dip california rolls into this. Just do it secretly, and it'll be fine. Actually, "wafu" does not mean east meets west. It means "Japanese style". East/west would be wayo - wa for Japanese and Yo for European or Western. Wa is the character for Japanese, and fu is the character for "style". or "in the style of" fu is also the character for wind.

    Recipe #166470

    Quick and easy. I like to dip steamed vegies into this.

    Recipe #166473

    This was the recipe my sister used when she came to our house for the holidays. My kids devoured this, but have recently discovered a taste sensation when they coupled this with raw spinach leaves. They just take a stack of spinach leaves, spread a bit of pesto on it, roll it up and much away. Healthy, flavorful, and easy! Note that the recipe provides for a way to use NO pine nuts and substitute butter instead. I thought that to be interesting, but not necessarily something I'd try myself...I'm leaving it in here in case someone's looking for a "different" pesto recipe.

    Recipe #203641

    Even though this says "summer" it's something that we eat year round. The biggest reason is that this is a lacto-fermented grain. Lacto-fermentation is good for several reasons, but we focus on the fact that it neutralizes unhealthy chemicals found in grains and adds beneficial micro-organisms to our oatmeal. This makes our morning bowl of oatmeal more digestible and increases the healthy flora in our intestinal tracts. Prior to treating our oatmeal this way, my daughter had a very hard time digesting grains. After learning how to lacto-ferment grains, she will eat bowls of the stuff in the morning. I add sweetener to the fruit, which I know isn't always a great thing, but do what suits you best. We double the recipe and make two batches a week for my two kids and I, so clearly this is a staple in our house.

    Recipe #185645

    This is a dish that my kids LOVE for lunch. It's not inexpensive because the tarako can be spendy, but it's quick so I like to have the ingredients on hand. This isn't a sauce like spaghetti sauce that completely covers the pasta, it's more like a pesto. When adding the heavy cream, just get it to the consistency of pesto that you can toss with pasta. If the pasta sticks hopelessly together when tossing the sauce with it, you've overcooked the noodles. The recipe ingredient filters here won't allow the phrase "2 tarako (salted code roe)" as an ingredient, but that is specifically what this recipe is written for.

    Recipe #135630

    Umami. Known as the fifth basic taste, some people liken it to the difference between the flavor of an almost ripe tomato and a perfectly ripe tomato. Also found in sea salt, cured meats, cheese and mushrooms, it imparts a savory heartiness that deepens flavor. This is a mixture of several different known umami ingredients. I've toyed with a recipe that was posted as "umami salt" by the breakaway cook, changing some of the ingredients and adjusting the method. Use in soups, salad dressing, sprinkled into casseroles, or wherever you want a richer flavor. A little goes a long way, so start with a small amount and increase to the level that suits you.

    Recipe #309160

    My son and I were experimenting with using whole grains and we came up with this recipe. We found that the cooking heat is a bit lower than normal pancakes would require and that they need to be carefully watched and turned. If you want to add fruit, sprinkle them into the batter after you put the batter on the griddle. We like bananas, blueberries, raspberries, strawberries or mandarin orange segments.

    Recipe #329038

    I've seen this recipe in several places this week and had to try it. Works great. The finished product is best served sliced in half so that everyone can see the beautiful strawberries on the inside!

    Recipe #110762

    This is a really bland, simple meal that you can eat when you've just overindulged in heavy rich foods. Quick to make!

    Recipe #186955

    The recipe for these crisps were scrawled onto a scrap piece of paper by a friend. They are wonderful. I'm not certain of the yield, so I've indicated that these make "1 batch."

    Recipe #139057

    A very easy way to make a tofu custard without the fuss of making soy milk. I start with commercial, unsweetened soy milk. We have successfully substituted eggbeaters for part of the eggs. Typically, we use a teaspoon of powdered dashi instead of the salt.

    Recipe #387698

    My kids like this because the cabbage is cooked well in this recipe and doesn't have that raw feel to it. I use package coleslaw in this as it means I can get dinner on the table quickly when I need to. I've tried other recipes, but the batter seems really bland to me. This version uses dashi, sake and soy sauce, which makes it seem more home-flavored to me. Add in whatever other protein sources along with or in lieu of the ham...I've seen shrimp, tuna, imitation crab and crab used with great success. Just make sure that there's enough batter to hold everything together.

    Recipe #227518

    We enjoy pureed cauliflower but have had difficulty getting the consistency right. Steaming and boiling the cauliflower causes it to pick up too much moisture and the result is a really horrid soupy mess. We solved the problem by roasting the cauliflower with some garlic instead of using a water based method. The texture is close to mashed potatoes, but much healthier. I've indicated that this will serve 4, but to be honest, when I do this, I double the recipe. We use a lot of garlic, but we love it roasted. If you don't like garlic, don't use as much!

    Recipe #333333

    Sumo wrestlers eat lots of "nabe" to get up to fighting weight. We've toned our salmon soup down a lot, so this really isn't going to pack on the pounds unless you eat it with a LOT of rice. Sumo wrestlers have their own recipes and vary the soup depending on the ingredients they have. This is our version of Ishikari Nabe, using ingredients that we are readily able to find here. It isn't authentic, but works with our kids. The recipe is meant to be adjusted to incorporate things you may have at hand. We often add spinach, squash, green onions, sweet onions, mushrooms. You can add the eggs if you want, usually the tofu and salmon are plenty for us. If you really want to eat like a sumo wrestler, you should just dump your STEAMED rice right into the soup.

    Recipe #52082

    This recipe came from a friend who loves to bake and does it very well. I like these cookies because they are soft and chewy, but still a little bit substantial. The combination of brown sugar, butter, and raisins is so comforting, these cookies will disappear before they cool!

    Recipe #84995

    A friend gave me this recipe and it's great. From the time she was a toddler, my daughter has loved to snack on this, the spicier the better. Adjust the ingredients to your taste, making it sweeter, spicier, or more sour. I know the sodium content in this will be astronomical, but remember that you don't consume all the soy sauce and that this is used as a condiment. Prep and cooking time does not include drying the daikon or allowing the pickles to sit overnight.

    Recipe #144844

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