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    69 Recipes

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    Northern India's game fish include mountain trout (introduced from Europe) and mahseer, a large native carp. This sauce can be used with these or any firm white fish.

    Recipe #428372

    This no-cook candy tastes somewhat like the inside of a Reese's peanut butter cup. It can be eaten on its own, or crumbled as a topping for ice cream or cake. (There is also a brazilian beef dish which people in the north of the country call "paçoca". It's more broadly known as paçoca de pilão to distinguish it from this candy.) Manioc is also known as cassava.

    Recipe #412182

    "Traditionalists often add palm oil to their frying oil for a more authentic taste. Adding a molho sauce or vatapa as a topping is very popular." The prep time includes soaking the dried peas overnight. From braziltravelvacation.com .

    Recipe #412180

    As a salad first course for a dinner party, these tasteful bites hint at the delightful meal to come. (Preparation note: The Radish Pea truffle must be prepared ahead, to set. The Walnut Tapenade and Strawberry Shrimp Chipotle truffles can be prepared ahead and refrigerated.)

    Recipe #378865

    "A traditional household remedy in Australia, eucalyptus leaves and oil are especially used for respiratory ailments such as bronchitis, croup, feverish conditions and skin problems like burns, ulcers and wounds." From easy-homemade-recipes.com

    Recipe #371189

    " An invigorating treatment from Aurora Spa in St. Kilda, Victoria, combining the best of Australian ingredients: salt from the Australian desert, lavender harvested in Tasmania, Australian bush flower essences, Queensland macadamia oil and the distinct aromas of the Australian bush- eucalyptus and tea tree oil. Salt has anti-inflammatory properties, remineralises the skin and reduces redness. It helps draw out toxins out of the body through osmosis and encourages skin to secrete its natural oils. Lavender helps to restore balance, enhance relaxation, refresh, energise and promote healing. This scrub is a stimulating exfoliate and leaves the skin well nourished and smooth. Do not apply to the face or on sunburnt skin, open cuts or wounds, after shaving or waxing, or to sensitive skin."

    Recipe #371186

    The Algarve region of southern Portugal was the last part of the country to be under moorish occupation. Their cuisine (and language) shows the influence of their location on the coast, as well as of their northern african conquerors.

    Recipe #371167

    As Lebanese immigrants settled in Puebla in the late nineteenth and early twentieth century, they influenced the region's cuisine. Tacos árabes feature a shawarma-style meat wrapped in a thick, pita-like flour tortilla, mexicanized with a salsa of ground chipotle.

    Recipe #370714

    "For most Mexicans, the Mennonites are tall, light-skinned people, dressed in overalls, who produce their famous cheese... Every family has at least one cow that produces the milk, cream and butter for daily use, as well as chickens for meat and eggs. Pigs are primarily raised for home-cured hams, cold cuts and bacon. The homemade garlic beef sausage has become popular in the [Chihuahua] region, where people know that the Mennonite products are made from all local ingredients, using traditional methods." (Recipe translated and adapted from recetasycomidas.com)

    Recipe #370708

    "The Mexican government desired to settle the barren northern areas of their country with industrious farmers such as the Mennonites. In 1922, at the invitation of President Alvaro Obregón, 20,000 Mennonites left Canada and settled in the state of Chihuahua. Mexico agreed to sell them land at reasonable prices and level no taxes for 100 years if the Mennonites would produce the bulk of cheese needed for northern Mexico." Today, these Mennonite farming communities maintain their culture, language (platdeutsch), and cuisine. (Recipe translated from tucocinafacil.net)

    Recipe #370698

    Adapted from Saveur. This very traditional mesoamerican sauce shows the influence of Oaxaca's location on the southern coast of Mexico. Serve this sauce over baked or fried chicken. Ingredient notes: There's really no substitute for epazote, so if you can't find it, just omit it. If Mexican anise is not available, asian star anise can be substituted. Arbol chiles are hot, so you may want to protect your hands when you are removing the stems and seeds, and be careful not to wipe your eyes or mouth. You can start with canned rather than dry beans, and skip the first step.

    Recipe #370690

    From Epicurious.com. Very traditional mesoamerican ingredients combine for a rich textured dish typical of Puebla, Mexico. This is a mild, layered sauce. Feel free to adjust the seasoning to make it your own - you can omit the cilantro, choose a hotter or milder chile, or remove the chicken skin and bones before serving. Most of the sauce preparation takes place while the chicken is simmering. For a quick meal after a long day, the chicken and the sauce can also be made ahead of time, with the final steps of the dish taking only a few minutes to heat and assemble.

    Recipe #370687

    Start with vitamin-rich carrots and pumpkin, naturally sweet honey, protein-packed peanuts, and a handy pocket of bread. Heat and stir to create an oh-so-not-healthy chewy candy treat. ("Prep time" includes cooling overnight.)

    Recipe #354051

    Start with the Italian cornmeal classic, polenta, and add the exotic new flavors of Marco Polo's journey to the East: chickpeas from Anatolia, spinach from Persia, cardamon from India and cinnamon from China. But don't worry, this recipe doesn't take years to complete! Prepared polenta and canned chickpeas make it easy (and nutritious).

    Recipe #354047

    A few substitutions to make this easy holiday dish a little more nutritious, yet just as tasty.

    Recipe #345991

    Aspic is one of the oldest dishes in European cooking. Unfortunately, in recent years it has come to be associated with cloudy, limp, congealed tomato salad. This recipe recaptures the rich beef taste, gemstone-clear appearance, and sensual melt-in-the-mouth texture of the classic french aspic, with a modern asian fusion flavor. Aspic is not a quick and easy dish, but it can be a stunner to impress at a dinner party, or to remind your family how special they are. (Some traditional ingredients can be difficult to find in a modern supermarket; please see notes on substitutions at the end of the recipe instructions.)

    Recipe #317840

    Peppersoup seasoning is a spice blend used in many nigerian soups and stews (not just pepper soup). Most of its components are difficult to find outside of Africa, although prepackage blends can be bought online or sometimes found in a specialty market. This is a simple substitute blend prepared from spices more readily available, adapted from celtnet.org.uk. This blend does not include tamarind, so that (or another acid, such as lime or lemon juice), should also be added to the soup.

    Recipe #311240

    Also spelled foofoo or foufou, fufu in its many variations is a staple in western and central Africa. Traditionally, it would be made by pounding - pounding, not mashing - the boiled tubers or plantains. This version offers a modern shortcut using the food processor. Use whatever proportions of starch suit your taste. Half yam (not sweet potato) and half green plantain might be a good starting point. Serve with soup, stew, or cooked vegetables. (Adapted from Bethelgroups Ltd.)

    Recipe #310286

    A Nigerian dish for leftover fish or yams. From "The Africa Cookbook".

    Recipe #310013

    From Benin, a seafood stew similar to gumbo found in the US gulf coast. ("Gombo", or some version of the word, is the name for okra in much of western Africa.) Serve with white rice. From "A Taste of Africa".

    Recipe #310011

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