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    7 Recipes

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    This is derived from a recipe in my CIA cookbook (The Professional Chef). I ran out of chicken stock while preparing Thanksgiving dinner a few years ago and substituted the broth I had boiled my vegetables in when preparing potato, rutabaga & parsnip casserole. (I just measure the amount of broth drained from the vegetables and subtract this amount from the 16 cups of chicken broth listed in the recipe. I always serve this bisque with Thanksgiving turkey dinner as an appetizer.

    Recipe #284904

    I finally convinced my brother that onions are edible. So now I serve this with the family's Thanksgiving turkey dinner. Note: I save the broth that is drained from the cooked vegetables and use it in my pumpkin bisque, which I serve as the appetizer for the turkey dinner.

    Recipe #284574

    This way of cooking ribs is hands-down the best you will ever find. Unfortunately, ribs taste better with some fat flavouring (unfortunate for those dieting). By cooking them on the rotisserie, the fat rolls from one rib to the next, basting them, instead of falling onto the coals and being lost. This is my invention - I will give you a picture and you must figure out how to make it. It's called a ribcage. You take some fencing wire and make a coil about 11-inches in diameter and as long as your grill's back burner. Put some wire "twist-ties" to hold the coil in a circular shape. Then take your rotisserie spit and put it through the middle of the coil. Make a spider's nest of wires on each end of the coil to hold the coil centred over the spit. Tie your seasoned ribs to the rib cage with butcher string. I usually use 5 or 6 strings, depending on the length of the ribs - and usually get 4-5 ribs on the cage. I know this sounds strange - but try it - you will love it. Everyone I have for dinner are making ribcages. P.S. - Although I almost always cook from scratch, I acknowledge when a product is better than my best. Texas Beer-B-Que rub (available on-line) is better than any I've made. Regarding the sauce - there are 2 kinds of people, some like it wet and others, like me and my DH just prefer them dry, so skip the sauce application.

    Recipe #249322

    1 Reviews |  By 2B's

    I think this recipe came from Canadian Living magazine, but am not sure. The whole meal (which is comprised of Recipe #239788, Recipe #239892, Recipe #239789 and Recipe #239791) embodies the Thai tradition of combining all the five tastes: sweet, hot, sour, salty and bitter in one meal.

    Recipe #239892

    2 Reviews |  By 2B's

    I think this recipe came from Canadian Living magazine, but am not sure. The whole meal (which is comprised of Recipe #239788, Recipe #239892, Recipe #239789 and Recipe #239791) embodies the Thai tradition of combining all the five tastes: sweet, hot, sour, salty and bitter in one meal.

    Recipe #239791

    9 Reviews |  By 2B's

    I think this recipe came from Canadian Living magazine, but am not sure. The whole meal (which is comprised of Recipe #239788, Recipe #239892, Recipe #239789 and Recipe #239791) embodies the Thai tradition of combining all the five tastes: sweet, hot, sour, salty and bitter in one meal.

    Recipe #239789

    I think this recipe came from Canadian Living magazine, but am not sure. The whole meal (which is comprised of Recipe #239788, Recipe #239892, Recipe #239789 and Recipe #239791) embodies the Thai tradition of combining all the five tastes: sweet, hot, sour, salty and bitter in one meal.

    Recipe #239788


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