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    160 Recipes

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    In step 2, if after mixing for 10 minutes the dough is still wet and sticky, add up to ¼ cup flour (a tablespoon at a time) until the dough releases from the bowl. For smaller cinnamon buns, cut the dough into 12 pieces in step 3.

    Recipe #487087

    You’ll need the juice and zest of one orange for this recipe. If the dough becomes too soft to work with at any point, refrigerate it until it’s firm enough to easily handle. Make sure to use tin foil liners, otherwise it will be very hard to get these buns out of the pan because the filling is so sugary.

    Recipe #487086

    We prefer to knead this dough in a standing mixer, but a food processor or your hands can do the job. If using a food processor, place the flour mixture in a processor fitted with the dough blade. Mix together the eggs, yolk, butter, and water in a large measuring cup and, with the processor running, add the egg mixture in a steady stream. Process until a ball of dough forms, about 1 minute. Remove the dough to a lightly floured surface and knead by hand for an additional minute, or until the dough becomes smooth and elastic. Alternatively, you can mix the dough by hand in a large bowl with a wooden spoon, until the dough comes together. Then transfer the dough to a lightly floured surface and knead until the dough forms a smooth ball. If the dough remains tacky, add more flour 1 tablespoon at a time. This method will take longer than using a standing mixer, but you will get the same results.

    Recipe #487085

    When rounding the dough and shaping the rolls, it is important to keep the remaining dough covered, otherwise it will quickly dry out and develop a skin. Rolling the dough into symmetrical rounds takes a little practice, but you will quickly get the hang of it. A dry, unfloured work surface helps because the dough will stick a little. Although we like using a French-style rolling pin for flattening the rolls, a more traditional option is a thin dowel or the handle of a wooden spoon. Whatever your choice, lightly flour it or the dough will stick to it.

    Recipe #487084

    If Chinese black vinegar is unavailable, substitute 2 teaspoons of balsamic vinegar and 2 teaspoons of rice vinegar. If Asian broad-bean chili paste is unavailable, substitute 2 teaspoons of Asian chili-garlic paste or Sriracha sauce. Serve with steamed white rice.

    Recipe #487082

    A whole 4-pound chicken, cut into 8 pieces, can be used instead of the chicken parts. Use a splatter screen when browning the chicken.

    Recipe #487066

    The glaze recipe makes enough to glaze 4 1/2 pounds chicken. To prevent burning, we found that it’s best to wait to apply the glaze until the chicken is nearly cooked.

    Recipe #487063

    After quartering, slice the onions pole to pole for substantial slices that will hold up to long cooking. Beef bones are stocked in the freezer or meat section of supermarkets.

    Recipe #487062

    The microwaved apples should be pliable but not completely soft when cooked. To test for doneness, take one apple slice and try to bend it. If it snaps in half, it’s too firm; microwave it for an additional 30 seconds and test again. If Calvados is unavailable, 1 tablespoon of apple brandy or white rum can be substituted. I have not made this yet, but with the too oily review, I went on line and looked at others who have made this and what they said. Some of them have also had this same problem, but note some had also changed to 2% milk. This might have also affected the batter. Other say they did not have this problem. One advised this might been because he had gotten the oil to emulsified into the batter using an immersion blender. They bakers with the too oily cakes advised they will cut down the oil to 1/2 cup add 1/2 cup apple sauce if they make again. Note this is more cutard like then a normal American cake texture.

    Recipe #487003

    This recipe, submitted by Robin Smith of Berryville, VA was one of the winners of our 2005 Holiday Cookie Contest. Use pumpkin puree (sometimes calls packed pumpkin) for this recipe, not pumpkin pie filling.

    Recipe #487002

    Macaroons must be baked on parchment paper. They will stick to an ungreased sheet and spread on a greased one. You need a slightly less stiff dough if piping the macaroons, so add water, as needed, to make a pipeable paste.

    Recipe #487001

    The final dough will be slightly softer than most cookie dough. For the best results, handle the dough as briefly and gently as possible when shaping the cookies. Overworking the dough will result in flatter cookies.

    Recipe #487000

    The cookies are softer and more tender when made with unbleached flour that has a protein content of about 10.5 percent. Pillsbury or Gold Medal works best; King Arthur flour has a higher protein content (around 11.7 percent) and will result in slightly drier, cakier cookies. Do not discard the butter wrappers; they have just enough residual butter on them for buttering the bottom of the drinking glass used to flatten the dough balls. To make sure the cookies are flat, choose a glass with a smooth, flat bottom. Rolled into balls, the dough will keep in the freezer for up to 1 week. The baked cookies will keep in an airtight container for up to 5 days.

    Recipe #486995

    If using a standing mixer in step 2, use the paddle attachment. The cookie dough will be very sticky, and the final cookie will have a soft, chewy, and slightly cakey texture. Testing the cookies for doneness can be a bit tricky; we found it easiest to check the edges of the cookies for firmness (they should be set), and the tops for cracking (there should be lots of tiny cracks).

    Recipe #486993

    Turbinado sugar is commonly sold as Sugar in the Raw. Demerara sugar, sanding sugar, or another coarse sugar can be substituted. Make sure the cookie dough is well chilled and firm so that it can be uniformly sliced. After the dough has been wrapped in parchment, it can be double-wrapped in plastic and frozen for up to 2 weeks. Prep-time includes chill time.

    Recipe #486990

    The final dough will be slightly softer than most cookie dough. For the best results, handle the dough as briefly and gently as possible when shaping the cookies. Overworking the dough will result in flatter cookies. **These cookies are better the next day. It takes a day for the spice flavor to really shine.

    Recipe #486989

    To melt the chocolate in a microwave, heat at 50 percent power for 2 minutes, stir, then continue heating at 50 percent power for 1 more minute. If not completely melted, heat an additional 30 to 45 seconds at 50 percent power. Semisweet chocolate chips may be added for a bigger chocolate punch; if used, they will slightly increase the yield on the cookies. We recommend using a spring-loaded ice cream scoop to scoop the dough. Resist the urge to bake the cookies longer than indicated; they may appear under-baked at first but will firm up as they cool.

    Recipe #486988

    Be careful not to overbake these brownies; they should be moist and fudgy.

    Recipe #486985

    Either Dutch-processed or natural cocoa works well in this recipe. These brownies are very rich, so we prefer to cut them into small squares for serving.**Take out Espresso if you want just chocolate brownies.

    Recipe #486983

    Make certain that you use Sure-Jell engineered for low- or no-sugar recipes (packaged in a pink box) and not regular Sure-Jell (in a yellow box); otherwise, the glaze will not set properly. The pie is at its best after two or three hours of chilling; as it continues to chill, the glaze becomes softer and wetter, though the pie will taste just as good.**I have made this and it is very easy. Not too sugar sweet. This recipe is best when the strawberries are at the peak of the season for your area. Cooking time includes chill time.

    Recipe #486909

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