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    29 Recipes

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    My mother always made cranberry sauce for Thanksgiving this way. I don't know where she got the idea, but it is delicious and we all loved it. She used whole cranberries and made it from scratch, but it's just as good and eaasier to use a can of whole berry cranberry sauce as the base. Any tasty apple will work. I used a Braeburn last time.

    Recipe #404244

    This recipe answers the question "How can I make a tasty meal from those leftover rotisserie chicken pieces?" In my house the breast is eaten first, often leaving wings, thighs and legs to congeal later in the fridge. These are not easy to deal with. Cold rotisserie chicken hangs on to its bones and skin with tenacity. This soup comes to the rescue. After a half-hour simmer in chicken broth, the meat practically falls off the bone and the skin is easy to remove and discard. The soup has a rich flavor and is easy to make. It also solves the problem of what to do with those four still-firm-but-whiskery carrots at the bottom of the crisper drawer. If you can get the mild green (spring) garlic, slice and add a whole head of that including the tender green stem. If not, regular garlic cloves are fine.

    Recipe #376587

    This recipe is so fast and easy you can serve polenta as a side dish any time. When it is done cooking, you can swirl in one or more additional flavor builders such as a tablespoon of butter, a tablespoon or two of parmesan cheese, chopped chives, fresh-ground pepper, or a tablespoon or two of half-and-half. This makes two generous servings with no leftovers.

    Recipe #375564

    Flavored steaming water adds succulence to these. The dipping sauce is a little different from plain mayonnaise or melted butter (although those are very good, too). Fresh artichokes should have tightly closed heads and not be withered-looking. To make a nice presentation, cut an inch off the top of the artichokes with a sharp knife, and snip the thorny tips from the leaves with kitchen shears. Cut the stems off flush with the bottom of the artichokes, then cut off the dark, dried-out ends of the stems. Steam the green sections of the stems right along with the artichokes. Sometimes the stems taste good and sometimes they don't, but you won't know unless you cook them. Try a bite of the stems when they are tender. If they taste good but are fibrous, peel them with a sharp knife. If they are good, you have bonus bites of tasty artichoke. If they taste bitter, just add them to the compost pile. A teaspoon is the perfect tool to scrape off the fuzzy center after eating the tender parts of the leaves. Please remove the fuzzy choke with care. As my father used to say, "That's the part that choked Arty." Then you can eat the artichoke bottom. That is your reward for all the work you did to pull off, dip and nibble the leaves one at a time. I have cooked them this way for a long time and am not sure where the idea came from, but it was probably Julia Child. The sauce is from my DBF. His brother made it when they were boys at home. It's good on broccoli, too.

    Recipe #372777

    This is so simple it is barely a recipe, but it is refreshing. If you like the Lassi drinks served in Indian restaurants, you might enjoy this. Sweeten with a few packets of Splenda if you prefer.

    Recipe #371783

    Our local Farmer's Market just started up for 2009. I made this with some of the good things I brought home, and enjoyed it very much as a light dinner. If you don't have chives, thinly sliced green onions might taste almost as good.

    Recipe #367632

    My version of Greek Salad. Sometimes two of us share this for dinner with homemade garlic bread. It's great for lunch, too. We love it! This salad really shows off a high quality olive oil! I have also made this with tender butter lettuce instead of the romaine. So good!

    Recipe #316511

    This is very easy, and economical when chickens are on sale. I've had good comments on this one. The dried vegetable flakes, brown and wild rices are sold in the bulk section of many supermarkets or natural food stores. This is the best use I know for frozen green beans. The liquid of the soup supports them somehow and makes them seem fresh.

    Recipe #315866

    This soup was inspired by vegetables on hand in my crisper drawer. I had a few beet greens - not enough to make a dish by themselves - but I combined them with some other veggies to make a light but filling soup. The garbanzo beans were added for protein and heartiness and I loved them with the other vegetables. Please let me know how you like it.

    Recipe #315710

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