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    117 Recipes

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    Auntie Ann spent many years working as the Research Editor of the National Geographic in Washington D.C. She also had a beautiful house facing the water in St. Michaels, Maryland. Quite often she had gatherings of all sorts. From the Washington set, dressed up dignitaries and special guests would arrive for a nice Friday evening cocktail party that included a nice dinner afterward. During her weekends in St. Michaels, she could relax sitting comfortably on a wicker chair facing the Harris Creek watching the swans swim to and fro in the water. Even though Auntie Ann had a busy productive life as an editor and another busy life on the shore, her cooking skills were perfection. Often during a cocktail party she would mix up (the day prior) a good amount of this dressing and ever so lightly, and daintily spoon this over some fresh salad greens and toss. When she was getting ready to have the Labor Day crowd in for some good old "Maryland Blue Crabs" at her home on the shore, she would use this dressing in a simple pasta salad, that could be kept outside longer as it didn't have any mayonnaise or dairy in it to spoil. I use this now for "Saturday Lunch on the Farm" salad, which has become a huge bowl of all kinds of lettuces, fresh cut up vegetables and olives. Hey you can't go wrong with Auntie Ann can you? After all; life is good when partaking of a salad, isn't it? Can be easily halved.

    Recipe #284322

    Life can't be about all beef. "Where's The Beef?" questions are fewer nowadays due to an influx of health concerns, as well as those that are watching their weight. The Longmeadow Farm is following suit and will openly and warmly embrace these new "burgers" to grace our "Saturday Lunch at the Farm" crowd. I wanted to produce a light(ish) tuna burger that made Dennis, Jerry, Uncle Dick, and my Dad feel as light as a Spring beetle floating around on a wind current after lunch. This recipe did it. Everyone was full, but not so full they wanted to clamber off to the backyard hammock, and pull their hat over their face. This gave them enough energy to have their giddy-up for all the many maelstroms that would undoubtedly follow them around for the afternoon. Go ahead, try them "Maryland" style with the use of our beloved "Old Bay Seasoning" and get ready to work hard this afternoon. Can be easily doubled for a big crowd.

    Recipe #282447

    Baking meatloaf was sending an aroma of goodness through the oven door, that followed like a wave to the family room. "Oh boy", my Dad, (who is 89) said, "Now, that smells good!" My Dad is not a man the gives compliments easily, nor is he the gushy type. But he is a hard working man, even at the age of 89 that appreciates (abate quietly) the finer things of life. The comfort of meatloaf begs to have a comforting, but a simply prepared side dish that will fill the stomach and bring happiness ever so quietly, to your soul. Late in the Fall we had dug potatoes, (even though it was still quite warm out for our State) and I had put them in the dark, cool basement to carry us through the winter and early Spring months. I went down to the basement and grabbed a few little potatoes and quickly went about making this very simple, but very heart warming potato dish, of course to feed my Dad as well as my family. Sometimes, there is nothing more satisfying then the normal, simple potato. I have used this recipe for probably 40 years, and to this day, it is as good tasting and filling as it was years ago.

    Recipe #281315

    Longmeadow Farm is trying something new. I feel inspired to make a nice warm treat, one that is a little less caloric but still captures that down on the farm taste. This recipe was adapted from a blog "Culinary Adventures" and since I had some canned pumpkin in the old pantry, I considered, and pondered and thought what the heck! After all, I don't need to be looking like one of our beautiful cows, "Flossy" as she is about ready to calve. And besides, it would be nice to fit into a smaller size overalls for the farm chores. Please note, my oven bakes these in exactly 15 minutes. I also have a pizza stone that stays put in the oven all the time, and radiates the heat a bit more. However; you may have to adjust baking times up or down depending on the accuracy of your oven. Most people are stating the 18 minute mark. I use the toothpick method of sticking it in the middle of the muffin to check for doneness. If it comes out clean, then your in business. Also note: I make these now for my vegan son, using a cake mix that is only soy and wheat based and a special dark chocolate that does not contain any dairy or eggs as well. For fun and frolic, I give em' a boost of sprinkled powdered sugar on the top.

    Recipe #281279

    I was in the nursing profession many, many, years ago. When the nursing staff was allowed to take a lunch break, I would meander down to our hospital cafeteria and order up one of these sandwiches. Of course, the cafeteria chefs had a special "seasoned grill" that punctuated years and years of cooking delectable delights, the way it used to be cooked, without the use of microwaves, and or already prepared, “boiled - in - the - bag” foods that came from “Sysco”. These amazing chefs even had special spatulas that you could easily imagine the pounding and flipping going on, being delicately tossed in the air, as somehow this made the food taste even more spectacular. After paying for the sandwich, I would sit down, and carefully open the wrapper, and inhale the aroma of freshly cut ham, the sweetest, most soft bread that I have ever known, and the mixture of ham juice and a bit of butter that warmed the ham prior to marrying with the bread. Needless to say, I always looked forward to this break, and on the occasion of visiting this hospital even today, I reflect back on those days of good ol’ cooking as it used to be, and the delights these very special chefs produced. To this day I still make these at home, occasionally for lunch or a quick dinner. After the cafeteria chefs put this yummy sandwich together they would wrap it in (1) wax paper (2) then aluminum foil. By the time you got to your table, the tastes had developed and probably steamed in the combination of wax paper and foil. Either way, I guess these magical chefs will never be forgotten as this made my day complete, every single day. I hope you enjoy this sandwich as much as I. Try the wax paper and foil too, [if you have time].....you will see what I'm talking about.

    Recipe #272233

    A nifty little treat that brings all the ingredients together, you might want to stuff the whole egg half right into your mouth.

    Recipe #272201

    A great marinated feta cheese cube(s) with all time wonderful coriander, peppercorns, capers, and bay leaves. Thyme also included on warm toasts. *Time* for cooking does not include marinate time.

    Recipe #272181

    Besides Dennis, and my family on the farm, my other great love is the nifty tomato. It is in my top 2 food choices ever. Upon grabbing the little hiding tomato in the garden, and popping into your mouth on a hot summer day is; about the most terrific taste and feeling one can have. I typically feel like "Julie Andrews" in "The Sound of Music" when she twirls about singing about the "Hills are alive....." I just can't help it. I eat so many tomatoes in fact, (all seasons) that I honestly get those double darn sores in your mouth from the acid. That aside, I haven't met a tomato I have like. This is why this recipe, to me, is quite simply one of the best uses of a tomato that has ever been discovered. Quite honestly, I love ground beef tartare. Sometimes due to dietary smartness, I can't always go around and order Beef Tartare. Jacques Pepin, (great, great Chef) came up with the wonderful addition to the tartare world. I especially love the use of tomato water sauce. Read on, and see if you wouldn't like it too.

    Recipe #270493

    As the new snow blew in from the ol' North, it appears to be just a delightful day for the birds outside who are eating, and scattering seed everywhere to beat the band. Hundreds of birds gathered to fight over their bird seed, and the squirrels are starting to get into the act as well. I can see the deer moving in from the now snow white meadow to make their bellies plumb from eating extra corn at the full corn cribs. I just finished supplying the cattle with their sweet hay which is placed in their feeders, and calves were sleeping away after gorging on mother's milk. Everyone is fed. Good! Feeling rather proud at fulfilling the many needs of hungry animals and birds on the farm, I ponder for a minute, thinking "what can I feed us today"? Dennis reminds that he hasn't eaten since early in the morning and his stomach is growling like a lone tiger waiting for some action. Nope, can't forget Dennis....so I ran to the kitchen to see what I could scratch up. A potato left over from potato salad that had already been boiled, fresh bacon and fresh eggs. I set out to put this easier then hanging wash on the line during a breezy day recipe. Quick as winking your eye, and you have a platter of goodness right before your eyes. Which reminds me now, just where did Dennis go, oh, wait a minute....he's right here. Dennis has a *cute* habit of coming up behind and scaring me a lot. And this was gonna be one of *those* days.

    Recipe #270058

    This recipe is adapted from Jacques Pepin and we love it. In the winter, if the wood stove is cranked all the way, I will put my cast iron skillet on our wood stove top, get hot, and sizzle the salmon right in the hot skillet. This recipe is still possible if you don't have a wood stove. A nice non stick skillet and a stove will suffice. A real nice tasting salmon with the lemon dressing drizzled on top.....well, it makes Dennis and my Dad real happy to come home from a long winter day.

    Recipe #270055

    The day started out gray and menacing. A slight case of sleet was coming down. And a sneeze too. The farm had decided to take a break today and not bust anything terribly awful. Two tractors were being fixed somewhere up North, so none of us particularly wanted to go to town to grab a sandwich, which; we quite often do on Sunday at lunchtime. In fact, the fire was stoked, we were dry, and sleet is not that fun. At least with snow you can plow, or just make snow forts. So today, I decided to make a nifty sandwich for the two of us to eat, side by side, with our feet facing the wood stove. I wanted to whip together something that you had to lick your fingers because it was just that delicious. Also, I had to have everything on hand, right here at home, remember; we weren't going to town. Of course, make this your own fish sandwich. Add the cheese to the top, instead of the bottom, perhaps jalapeno cheese, use some soft bread, make the tartar sauce low fat, or; just grill some fresh fish, or lightly bread the fresh fish fillet, and bake. You might even add a bit of sliced tomato, or a bit of vegetarian bacon (especially for twissis), a big slice of onion, chopped lettuce, spinach leaves, etc. Whatever you chose, just don't go into town. You don't have to now. NOTE: I am sorry this disappointed the chef by having you adding salt and cayenne pepper. Please, anyone that knows my recipes, if you don't care for any of the items, please don't use them. It's ok by me to make this good for you and your family and to certainly not be wasting food. I am sorry this didn't work for you, but thanks for trying it.

    Recipe #269400

    Apples were literally flying through the air, as we went around trying to gather the last of our McIntosh's from the cool ground. The wind was blowing so hard I thought my own farm coat would blow right off my back. What was I gonna to do with last apples, anyway? Upon reentering my home, I poked around the cupboard, to see what my be behind the can of sauerkraut and a bag of white beans. Low and behold! I found dried apricots...and in another cupboard next to my canned applesauce, I found some walnuts that needed to be cracked or perhaps thrown out to the squirrels who were already devouring the birdseed in the feeders. I want something quick, that smells beyond compare, and to serve warm later this afternoon. Why do I pick walnuts instead of pecans for the crumble? Well, for us on the farm, pecans tend to be a good sizable price difference, and also these are the little walnuts that came from our tree in the orchard. Can't get much cheaper then this, right? Anyway, please feel free to use pecans interchangeably. I know either way, sitting down in the rocking chair later today, with a scoop of this aromatic crumble will allow your mind to wonder and you get to rest and daydream for a bit.

    Recipe #268422

    Most of the time (through my entire bread making) I have various bits of loaves of bread that just don't get eaten. I quickly take that last piece of bread right out of Dennis' mouth as he is about to take the biggest bite. I say, "Hey! Wait a minute dear husband, I need those for breadcrumbs!" Andi- they will be breadcrumbs once I swallow the slice of bread." Dennis resounds. "Awwww, honey! I exclaim, They are for the topping to your lima bean gratin. I need them." Once Dennis hands back the bread, I proceed to make some delicious little breadcrumbs that can be used interchangeably to crunch up any meal. I normally have a heel or two left of --Nimz--'s Recipe #157517 left over and this combined with rosemary and thyme make a very flavorful crumb. I use this on a fish fillet, (a mild fish) or a chicken breast, because it brings so much pizazz to the item it is covering.

    Recipe #268358

    Cute little berry cubes that bring joy to your life as well as your glasses. I use these in the Summer or Spring to bring a joy to a tickling glass of ice tea, farm water, champagne, wine, or tonic water. Easy to put together, and a glorious in view.

    Recipe #268344

    How in the world does a potato salad become fun? It is fun for various reasons, one because potatoes by their very unusual nature are fun. They grow away peacefully slumbering in the ground, not really caring or observant of the world above them. They are funny looking oval creatures that are dirty, grimy, and don't always smell that great upon harvest. But there is nothing better then digging potatoes, although back breaking at times, the happiness one can appreciate when finally touching the big vegetable waiting as a ripe egg under the deep dark earth, to delight your taste buds, and bring wonderful nourishment to your body and soul. And hey, this little recipe has no mayonnaise, no egg, but lots of flavor. Enjoy, and remember how the potato got its start. I use Recipe #43522 by Bev for my Italian Dressing. Oh my, but this is delicious!

    Recipe #268010

    The Longmeadow Farm was buzzing with activity today! Corn cribs were being filled to their full capacity, and tons of dust with particles were flying high over the top of the yellow barn. The alfalfa and timothy grass fields were being rolled in the distant fields by Bubba. Everyone was in a buzz to make sure everything was working and progressing along. Such is the case this particular Saturday, and to be honest here; not everything was progressing as normal. Chains broke, wheels flew off tractors as if taking flight, and the farm truck hose broke, hissing and spitting like a wild snake run amok. Ahhhhh, a typical Saturday on the farm. These are the kinda of days that makes my Dad steam like a "train whistle". In fact; my Dad, really doesn't always adhere to the old saying, "patience is virtue". Along about 12:30 or so in the early afternoon; after the old mower didn't start despite Jerry trying to stuff a rag on the miserly 2nd hand spark plug.......and so much ether was being sprayed around the workshop to start the mower, I am sure we could of put all of the neighboring folks asleep right where they stood. My dad calmly took off his hat, scratched his head, threw his hammer down in the dirt so hard it almost bounced back and hit him in the leg, while he implored and stated at the same time, "I've had enough"! Although my father tends towards obtaining a bit of an angry flair from time to time from all the mishaps on that happened during any particular Saturday; he does however, perk up when he knows we are having hamburgers for our "Saturday Lunch at the Farm". These are so easy to throw together, and with the addition of Worcestershire sauce, a great taste and fun too. Heck I even have vegan Worcestershire sauce and vegan crumbles to make this great, simple burger, for my sons, Bryan and Mike. I sure hope your day goes better then ours did........ if not--go make your own burger...... and you can even bet the farm on it. I did!

    Recipe #267986

    The broccoli keeps growing and growing. It's a darn hardy vegetable plant that gives and gives. Once you take the first crown, then the darling plant proceeds to take on many different baby crowns, that are tender, and perfection plus! I really like that a simple, yet, flourishing plant can bring that much enjoyment to our day. I particularly like this recipe, as it can be a whole dinner for us some evenings. Although Dennis does require "meat" at most meals, he could just as happily toddle off with a large scoop of this casserole and a fork, and he proclaims he is in heaven. Just a simple, farming, boastful dish of warmness and total soul comforting veggies. I agree, this is not a skinny dish, but you can make it that way just by changing the fat to low fat and increase the spices. Come'on -- try it, I promise it won't hurt a bit.

    Recipe #267839

    You are never too old to learn new tricks. Sometimes I must appear as a gentle dog, I go along thinking that I can and will do some recipes that same ol' way, day after day, week after week. You know, you've probably been there yourself. One recent holiday, the statement turned out to be the truest statement that I have come to know. Well one of many true statements I have come to know....anyway, jumping back into the story.....I was buzzing along like a honey bee running back to the old bee hive stuck up inside the old shed, and blow me down with a piece of paper towel, I forgot to steam the shrimp! Our guests would soon be arriving, and they expected.....well....food. And lots of it too. All four burners were covered with various foods whistling away, and the oven was packed up like the attic after Christmas. I had 2 pounds of fresh shrimp that I had purchased the day before to be made....today! Was wondering for a moment what I should do. I could sit on them as a mother hen who is warming the underside her great berth, or, I could use the microwave. Nah. No. Nada. Not gonna do this. I don't want the shrimp to be like an old farm tire that has lost its usefulness. Ok. well, I'll try it. Holy confetti. Jumping Joe Flat. It worked! Euphoria set upon the house that stood on Longmeadow Farm and people started smacking their lips, yelping, and a joyous uproar could be heard from the house that special Holiday eve. Now, don't go saying you can't microwave shrimp, cause this might make you change your mind.

    Recipe #267826

    Typically, at the end of a long Saturday, after the farm has been put to bed, I bake these little focaccia delights. The bread usually fills the empty pockets of hunger that have made themselves known during the long afternoon. Sometimes I prep the dough the night before, or quite often, just plop the bread and make it pretty quickly. We usually sit around the wood stove, and devour a couple of pieces with some nice warm tea, or a cold beer, depending on how much we broke on the farm during that afternoon. Either way, enjoy, have fun, and always eat well.

    Recipe #267632

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