Recipe Sifter

X
  • Start Here
    • Course
    • Main Ingredient
    • Cuisine
    • Preparation
    • Occasion
    • Diet
    • Nutrition
1

Select () or exclude () categories to narrow your recipe search.

2

As you select categories, the number of matching recipes will update.

Make some selections to begin narrowing your results.
  • Calories
  • Amount per serving
    1. Total Fat
    2. Saturated Fat
    3. Polyunsat. Fat
    4. Monounsat. Fat
    5. Trans Fat
  • Cholesterol
  • Sodium
  • Potassium
  • Total Carbohydrates
    1. Dietary Fiber
    2. Sugars
  • Protein
  • Vitamin A
  • Vitamin B6
  • Vitamin B12
  • Vitamin C
  • Calcium
  • Iron
  • Vitamin E
  • Magnesium
  • Alcohol
  • Caffeine
  • Find exactly what you're looking for with the web's most powerful recipe filtering tool.

    You are in: Home / KK - Chef #426156's Public Recipes
    Lost? Site Map

    Recipe Box is Here

    Save your favorite recipes

    Upload your own

    Create and manage Shopping Lists

    Share with friends

    18 Recipes

    Sort by: Newest | Rating | Photos | Time to Make | A-Z

    This recipe was published in the January 2010 issue of Bon Appetit magazine and it inspired me to give baklava a try. It also helped that I had a package of phyllo dough in the freezer that was crying out to be used. Needless to say, this recipe makes a gorgeous and flavorful pan of pastry. Minneola oranges (aka Honeybells) are now ripe here in Florida, and their juice gave the sauce a rich perfume. The orange-cardamom combination also offset the rich nuttiness of the pistachios perfectly. Heaven in a 13 x 9 pan! The only hitch in the recipe for me was that the phyllo I had was larger than the recipe called for, so I let some sheets come up the sides of the pan a little and folded the rest over and spread a little butter on them. The edges got a little thicker than the center, but were extra crispy and wonderful as a result! Be sure to cover the phyllo with plastic wrap and a damp towel while working with it, and if it tears or breaks, don't worry about it. I felt like mine was a messy patchwork quilt, but it didn't show when it was done and looked very professional. The article that was with the recipe suggested using the back of the hands to lift and move the phyllo, and it was a great suggestion and made it much easier to work with.

    Recipe #407785

    This recipe will make two large loaves, and we often make one of them into Cinnamon Raisin Bread. To do this, after the first rise knead about 1/3 cup raisins into the dough before rolling it out flat. Then after rolling it out flat, brush the dough with melted butter, then sprinkle with a heavy layer of a cinnamon-sugar mixture (1 tsp cinnamon to each Tbsp sugar) and roll up the dough into a loaf as in the recipe. I also usually grease the pan a little more heavily for a Cinnamon Raisin loaf. This bread made wonderful yet inexpensive Christmas gifts!

    Recipe #405756

    This recipe is always a hit with everyone, but especially with kids and chocolate lovers. I've had this since back in the 1970's, and it was one of the first recipes I saved as a teenager. Nice and chocolate-y, and who can resist the sweet cream cheese?

    Recipe #323902

    This cake hits the spot in the summer, when you want a lighter dessert. I love it for the 4th of July, when I serve blueberries and sliced strawberries over the top for a red, white and blue theme. For busy moms, you can make your favorite white cake according to the box, use a can of blueberry pie filling (1/2 in the cake and 1/2 on top after baking) and a container of cool whip - which is how I used to make this cake back in the 1970's. They'll still love it.

    Recipe #312094

    This makes a pretty and popular Christmas cookie. The filling came from a recipe in a newspaper at least 16 years ago, but to get the cookie I dreamed of, I tried the dough from many pinwheel cookie recipes before finally settling on this one about five years ago. Keep chilling the dough if it gets too soft while working with it.**A reviewer had trouble getting the pinwheel effect, so I have altered this recipe and ingredients to make the dough rectangle a little bigger. Also, I always bake my cookies on a Silpat so sticking is never an issue. I find I get more consistent browning and fewer overdone edges when using a Silpat, too.

    Recipe #270000

    As a Maryland native growing up, crab was always plentiful, available and fresh - usually caught that day. Today I buy fresh lump or jumbo lump crab for this soup, depending on the audience. Using a lesser grade of crab won't give you the premium results you are probably seeking.

    Recipe #204526

    This sauce is so very different than traditional sauces and is one of my favorites. It was published in a local newspaper along with Grand Marnier Cranberry Sauce with Oranges as suggestions for 'new' sauce ideas, and I've been making them both ever since. Because grocery store pears are rarely ripe when purchased, it is best to buy them a few days ahead so they can sit on the counter and ripen up. Unripe pears just don't work in this recipe. I hope you enjoy it as much as we do. The cardamom gives a traditional Thanksgiving meal a touch of the exotic!

    Recipe #442460

    This recipe is my family's favorite recipe for cranberry sauce. It appeared in a local newspaper about 10 years ago and I have made it every year since then. I always make two sauces if I'm having more than 8 guests - the other is usually Cranberry Sauce with Pears and Cardamom, which is very different from this sauce and gives people a choice of very different flavors and textures. I've always used Grand Marnier instead of the other choices of orange liqueur or orange juice concentrate, although when it comes to the fruit, I've used Minneola (aka Honeybell) or Orlando Tangeloes instead of Naval oranges. Hope you enjoy this recipe as much as we do!

    Recipe #442459

    My stepfather, Dan Kroesen, loved mac and cheese, especially at Thanksgiving. He called this recipe "el primo" and I named it after him. Sometimes I use 1/8 tsp cayenne pepper instead of the paprika for a little added zip.

    Recipe #441218

    This recipe originally came from a book called Enjoying American Wines issued by the California Culinary Academy in the mid-1980's. My favorite story about it was when making it on a camping trip to Key West. A man walked by our camp site as I was finishing the sauce and said "Something tells me that is not Cream of Mushroom soup!". Boy, was he right. This is a delicious dish that you can serve to anyone with pride. I've doubled the sauce ingredients from the original recipe because we usually serve it with rice (usually jasmine or basmati) and we like to have extra sauce on the rice. I've made this recipe more often than any other single recipe in my repertoire and hope you enjoy it as much as we do.

    Recipe #440454

    Several years ago DH and I acquired a gas smoker and found our smoked salmon to be very popular with people who like smoked fish. Originally, I found a recipe for Bourbon Smoked Salmon on the Internet, but the poster said he had adapted it from a recipe made with scotch. Being a scotch drinker, I changed it to scotch, added a little more sugar and made other changes to the original recipe over the years. We usually use Alder for the wood, however Apple also works well. We serve this on a platter with a garnish of a spicy olive and marinated vegetable mix from our local grocery store, along with some small slices of lemon and lime. Please note: the fish needs to marinate between 4-24 hours, which is not included in the prep or cook time.

    Recipe #431742

    This recipe originated as one from Barefoot Contessa, called Bay Scallop Gratin, however I made a few changes to her original ingredients and the cooking technique. I also make this with Bay Scallops, Sea Scallops or Tilapia - all with equal success. The original recipe used Pernod, however Sambucca is less expensive and is usually available in a "mini" at the liquor store. You can make individual dishes or use a larger casserole, depending on your audience, but I prefer the individual dishes because each person gets some nice juice in which to sop some crusty bread.

    Recipe #431695

    After looking for a really good spring roll recipe for years, I finally found this one in a cookbook called Thai Food and Cooking. These are quite a bit of work, but very much worth it! I usually make a double batch of filling one day and chill it before rolling up about a hundred small spring rolls the following day. Then freeze them and use whenever you want a little extra something with dinner or as an appetizer. When cooking, make sure your oil is between 360 and 375 degrees Fahrenheit. If the oil is too cool, the spring rolls will be greasy. I serve these with a prepared spicy-sweet chilli sauce sold in oriental stores. For oriental cooking in general, I keep a bag of individually frozen shrimp in the freezer for convenience.

    Recipe #361805

    This recipe came from a box of Duncan Hines cake mix, but I've added some vanilla and extra spices to make it memorable! Being from Duncan Hines means to use a cake mix without pudding. Also, I like to start with a smooth, bland commercial applesauce and sweeten it with brown sugar, then jazz it up with some extra cinnamon and cardamom - whatever spices suit your fancy - so the applesauce tastes really good to start with. A smooth applesauce allows the cake to remain light. If you don't have cardamom, try some five-spice powder. For frosting, use a cream cheese frosting by itself or sprinkled with chopped nuts. For a diffferent flavor, add some dulce de leche (caramel sauce) to your cream cheese frosting along with a little maple flavoring. This is one of my favorite cakes!

    Recipe #359864

    Many years ago a restaurant called GD Graffitti's in Rockville, MD had a huge fruit and salad bar and they served something similar to this as a dressing or dip for fruit. It took me years to come up with this 'copycat'. You can even make it without the pineapple juice, but I prefer the fruity flavor the juice adds.

    Recipe #315163

    Crab cakes were a staple in our house as I was growing up on the Severn River, in Maryland. The key is using the best crab you can find and keeping other ingredients to a minimum. You can use a little Old Bay seasoning instead of the hot sauce and worchestershire sauce, but I find Old Bay to be overpowering for delicate crab (unless you're just picking crabs and drinking beer - another Chesapeake Bay tradition). I must confess that sometimes I use dried bread crumbs instead of cracker crumbs, raw chopped green part of green onions instead of regular onion sauteed in butter, or Japanese panko bread crumbs for the coating. Vary the recipe as you choose, but keep it simple, please.

    Recipe #312918

    I created this recipe years ago, and during the past year have seen similar ones in newer cookbooks. While the recipe calls for Boursin cheese, I made it recently with the Tipsy Boursin Cheese recipe posted on this site and it is just as good as when made with the real thing. The stuffing also makes wonderful stuffed mushrooms. I prefer to take the breast off the bone so the spinach is lightly cooked, but it can be made with the bone in - just bake it longer. Use the type of spinach you would buy for a salad and serve it with Jasmine or Basmati rice.

    Recipe #301724

    This crepe recipe is my DH's favorite. We have an annual peach party and serve about 12 peach desserts, but the peach crepes are the favorite every year. We credit this recipe for the kudos. We've had it so long, we can't even remember where it came from.

    Recipe #244328


    Displaying up to 20 pages of results. To see all results, or register.
    Advertisement

    Free Weekly Newsletter

    Get the latest recipes and tips delivered right to your inbox.

    Your e-mail is safe. Privacy Policy
    Advertisement

    Over 475,000 Recipes

    Food.com Network of Sites