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    3,307 Recipes

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    This is from Modernist Cooking and here's what they say,"One of the easiest ways to try out molecular gastronomy is by creating "pearls". Most pearls are solid jelly balls that can be used to garnish dishes or as an amuse-bouche. Here we create sweet-sour balsamic vinegar pearls that are a great way to add a hit of flavor to many different dishes. The process of making them is even pretty easy. We first combine the vinegar with agar agar and bring it to a boil. Then we drizzle it into very cold olive oil that chills the droplets into spheres before they reach the bottom of the glass. Once you rinse off the balsamic vinegar pearls they are ready to use or you can store them in the refrigerator for later use." You can see their video on how to make pearls here: http://www.modernistcookingmadeeasy.com/info/modernist-recipes/more/balsamic-vinegar-pearls-recipe I saw Tyler Florence's general recipe for these pearls and got the exact measurements off the internet. Have fun!

    Recipe #500406

    The perfect drink for a cold cold night. From Oh she glows.

    Recipe #500371

    This lassi is a variation on the tremendously popular North Indian mango lassi, using papaya and citrus for a bright and refreshing drink. I have changed the original recipe using soy or coconut milk yogurt instead of dairy. Use whichever yogurt you like. Adapted from Serious Eats.

    Recipe #500370

    Honey(raw organic is best) is one of nature’s miracles. It is a delicious ingredient in many foods, has antibacterial properties, works as a humectant (keeps things moist), soothes a cough or sore throat, and makes your tea about 1,000 better-and that’s just scratching the surface really. Whether you’re using it as a sweetener, or trying to kick a cough, it’s just plain useful. Here are 5 flavors (and a general method) to infuse your honey and make it that much more wonderful. From everydayroots.

    Recipe #500263

    A delicious smoothie using walnut milk(easy to make-see Recipe#500254). From Aida Mollencamp

    Recipe #500255

    You've heard of almond milk, you can also make other nut milks, like walnut milk. Here is a good recipe from Better Homes and Gardens. The nuts need some time to soak, so plan accordingly. Compared to certain other nuts, such as almonds, peanuts and hazelnuts, walnuts (especially in their raw form) contain the highest total level of antioxidants. California, China, Iran, Turkey, Ukraine, Mexico, Romania, India, France and Chile are the largest producers of walnuts. Interesting note: In China, pairs of walnuts have traditionally been rotated and played with in the palm of the hand, both as a means to stimulate blood circulation and as a status symbol. Pairs of large, old and symmetrically shaped walnuts are valued highly and have recently been used as an investment, with some of them fetching tens of thousands of dollars. Pairs of walnuts are also sometimes sold still in their green skin, as a form of gambling known as du he tao.[

    Recipe #500254

    These powdered sugar-dusted lime and lemon bars are begging to be brought to your next spring potluck. Their irresistible citrus flavor and cute lemon and lime peel garnish means they're sure to be the hit of the buffet table. From Better Homes & Gardens.

    Recipe #500231

    The hot chocolate is perfectly creamy and sweet. The graham cracker crumbs meet the lips with a sweet surprise at every sip. And the toasty marshmallows absolutely MAKE it. If you prefer mix hot chocolates, simply skip the hot cocoa part and add your favorite mix to the mug. The graham cracker rim and toasty marshmallows are what really sets this recipe apart. Hope you love it! I changed the recipe just a bit to use dark chocolate. Your choose.

    Recipe #500130

    Try this vegan recipe from Oregon, your tongue will forever thank you! With ginger, orange zest and molasses...yummm! Try it, your tongue will forever thank you. From Morgan Grundstein-Helvey, Dovetail Bakery and posted in Oregon Live(hosted by The Oregonian)

    Recipe #500128

    Papayas are everywhere in Samoa. Here is a great way to use them.

    Recipe #500088

    Guasacaca is a popular condiment in Venezuela made from mashed and seasoned avocados. It is very similar to Mexican guacamole. Serve guasacaca as an accompaniment to grilled meats, poultry, salads, empanadas or arepas. From whats4eats. I have tweaked the recipe just a little.

    Recipe #500061

    This versatile Peruvian potato dish makes a great light meal or a fine addition to a buffet spread. Causa can be layered with any number of fillings — chicken salad and tuna salad are favorites. Vegetarian fillings are posted here too. I put tuna salad in the ingredients so the computer would post it, vegetarian salad wouldn't go through. Served cold, causa rellena is often topped with extravagant garnishes and sauces for a colorful presentation. From whats4eats.

    Recipe #500059

    Llapingachos (yah-peen-GAH-chos) are a popular side dish in the highlands of Ecuador. They are often served with fried eggs and a simple salad of lettuce, tomato and avocado. Sometimes sausages and a side of rice are added to make a full and typically Ecuadorian meal.

    Recipe #500058

    Cuáker is a popular and healthy children's drink in Ecuador. Its name is the Spanish version of the name of the company most famous for selling oats and oatmeal. Beverages based on oats are popular throughout Central and South America. From whats4eats.

    Recipe #500057

    Meni-meniyong is a wonderful Malinese sesame-honey sweet. It's easy to make and is great for kids and adults alike.You can easily half or double this recipe. Addictingly good.

    Recipe #500051

    Telba is a healthy and refreshingly creamy beverage. Be careful how much you drink, though. Telba is a mild laxative. From whats4eats.

    Recipe #500050

    Yummy and creamy with lots of fresh flavor. You could use vegan "feta" cheese to make the salad completely vegan. This is a nice salad with roots in Albania. Recipe created by Kaylin on Kaylin's Kitchen blog.

    Recipe #500019

    In Iran, a pitcher of sekanjabin is served at family picnics, especially during those long, hot months. The syrup is simple: sugar, mint and water. But it’s the vinegar that makes this into a delicious sweet and sour concoction. The mint syrup can be served two ways. The first is as a dipping sauce for fresh, crisp lettuce leaves. There’s something quite novel watching grown adults lick their fingers while dipping their crispy greens into this very sticky syrup. Heads of lettuce are consumed by the bunches as everyone dips on leaf after another. Some prefer sekanjabin as a drink: diluted in water, served over a glass filled with ice and grated cucumber. You can control the amount of sweetness, adding more or less water as desired. Some prefer more tang and add a bit more vinegar or lemon juice.

    Recipe #500001

    This sounded just wierd enough to try it. Obviously a carrot is the same shape and close enough in color to make a decent hot dog substitute. But the real question is about the taste. The marinade really takes it to the next level. I think the sesame oil does it, but the vinegar gives it that “cured” flavor too. Adapted from Healthy Slow Cooking.

    Recipe #500000

    Wonderful over baby greens or spinach, with cranberries, nuts, mandarin oranges, etc. Adapted from the Silver Palate Cookbook, using walnut oil! Enjoy!

    Recipe #499999

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