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    You are in: Home / J. Ko's Public Recipes
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    33 Recipes

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    This recipe was given to my by the mother of our German exchange student. It is certainly not low calorie, but it is absolutely to die for! I would have died happy after eating it for the first time.

    Recipe #437389

    This recipe is posted in response to a request in the French Cheese of the Week thread in the French, Creole and Cajun Cuisine forum. Oka is a French-Canadian cheese named after the small village of Oka, Quebec where it originated in 1893. Oka cheese is a Port-Salut style cheese and was originally made by Trappist Monks at the Abbaye Cistercienne d'Oka, using a recipe they brought from Brittany. It has a pungent aroma and soft creamy flavour, sometimes described as nutty and fruity. Oka is covered with a copper-orange, hand-washed rind. The preparation time is approximate, as some people move more quickly than others. This recipe comes from the Agropur Company, which is the company which has taken over production of Oka cheese.

    Recipe #353915

    This recipe is posted in response to a request in the French Cheese of the Week thread of the French, Creole and Cajun Cuisine forum. Oka cheese is a French Canadian cheese named after the small village of Oka, Quebec where it originated in 1893. Oka cheese is a Port-de-Salut style cheese and was originally made by Trappist Monks at the Abbaye Cistercienne d'Oka, using a recipe they brought from Brittany. It has a pungent aroma and soft creamy flavour, sometimes described as nutty and fruity. This recipe comes from the Agropur Company, which is the company which has taken over the production of Oka cheeses. I like this recipe primarily because of the taste, but also because it showcases some wonderful Canadian cheese and wines.

    Recipe #353905

    I found this recipe in Jean Pare's "Company's Coming - Chocolate Everything" cookbook. A wonderful flour-free cake that's great for any special occasion.

    Recipe #321560

    1 Reviews |  By J. Ko

    The recipe for this sinfully decadent cake was graciously given to me by Chef Takashi Ito, Executive Chef of The Fairmont Empress Hotel in Victoria, BC, Canada. I went on a hunt for my friend, Chef # 777765, affectionately known as "Seven" in the Kid's Cooking Forum. The story, as I understand it, is that Seven and her husband visited the Empress more than 10 years ago and ate at Kipling's Restaurant in the Hotel. Seven is not a sweet eater, but she tried this dessert anyway, and has been dreaming of it ever since. Kipling's Restaurant has since been closed and re-opened under a new name. Seven mentioned the Chocolate Italiano Cake in one of the forums and I decided to try to get my hands on the recipe for her.

    Recipe #321555

    3 Reviews |  By J. Ko

    This is a favourite dish at our neighbourhood BBQs/potlucks. Certainly not low-fat, but then we're not going to be eating this every day, now are we? I have no idea where the recipe came from but it was given to me by one of my neighbours. Thank-you Heather!

    Recipe #313167

    This is a really nice, light dessert. Perfect after a big meal. My Mom gave me the recipe about 15 years ago and I've made it several times. So far, everyone who has tried it has liked it. I hope you do, too. Posted in response to a request for "white" desserts.

    Recipe #272160

    1 Reviews |  By J. Ko

    No more dry, flavourless turkey! Make sure your next holiday turkey is moist and flavourful, with a crisp, golden skin! Here is the brining recipe I use. I got this from the TV Show "America's Test Kitchen" about 8 years ago and it has never failed me. This method works best with a 12 to 14 lb turkey because the smaller turkeys cook more evenly than large birds. The taste has never been salty and the breast meat is very juicy; you could shave it if you wanted! The preparation time includes the brining and "drying" time. Edited to add: For planning purposes, I usually start the brining process approximately 24 hours prior to my planned serving time ie: 4:00 pm Saturday afternoon for a Sunday evening dinner. The turkey can be cooked and carved earlier in the day or timed to finish so you can carve at the table. NOTE: The turkey must be roasted unstuffed. With this method of cooking the internal temperature of the stuffing will not get hot enough to kill any bacteria that may be present. Prepare your dressing separately.

    Recipe #256545

    2 Reviews |  By J. Ko

    This meatloaf is quite different from the other 1261 (at time of posting) meatloaf recipes. I got this recipe from Jean Pare's Company's Coming for Christmas cookbook. I have made this several times for company and also for "freezer shower" contributions after friends have had babies. So far, everyone who has tried it really likes it. I hope you will, too! Enjoy!

    Recipe #253799

    29 Reviews |  By J. Ko

    This is a children's favourite in France and has quickly become my children's favourite, here in Canada. I saw Laura Calder's "French Food at Home" show on Food Network Canada (foodtv.ca) where she prepared this quick and delicious recipe. You can substitute or add any vegetable you wish. I have found it is great made with broccoli or cauliflower and I sometimes add a couple of julienned carrots just to switch it up a bit. A fairly healthy soup because it is not loaded with cream, flour, butter or highly processed cheeses.

    Recipe #246497

    7 Reviews |  By J. Ko

    I got this recipe from a friend of mine who is the manager of our local Starbuck's. It is now my children's favourite lemonade drink. Great with a shot of vodka for a more grown-up beverage.

    Recipe #237759

    11 Reviews |  By J. Ko

    This is incredibly easy to make and a delicious addition to any Asian-themed meal! I got this recipe from my Dad; I think he got it from a LCBO magazine about 10 years ago. The preparation time includes marinating time. The peanut lime dipping sauce can be made up to 3 days ahead, but grill the satays just before serving. You can also substitute beef, chicken or shrimp, for the pork, with equally delicious results!

    Recipe #232373

    5 Reviews |  By J. Ko

    This is a delicious dish. My father made it for me and gave me the recipe several years ago. I'm afraid I'm not sure where he got the recipe, but I believe it was from a chef at an inn in Maine. Like most absolutely fabulous dishes, this is not low fat but definitely worth the indulgence! This is really nice with a long grain rice and wild rice mixture or with nice crusty bread to sop up the sauce. Can be served as an appetizer or a main course.

    Recipe #228284

    1 Reviews |  By J. Ko

    A very light, delicious dessert. For an added chocolate touch, dip one end of ladyfingers in melted chocolate. I found this recipe in Company's Coming "Chocolate Everything" cookbook. I have made this for several dinner parties and birthdays. It looks very festive if a ribbon is tied around the outside of the cake. Total preparation time includes refrigeration time.

    Recipe #226117

    4 Reviews |  By J. Ko

    A real timesaver when you have a houseful of guests or just don't want to spend a lot of time in the kitchen. I found this recipe in Company's Coming for Christmas cookbook and it has become a year-round family favourite.

    Recipe #224650

    1 Reviews |  By J. Ko

    Served with a tossed lettuce or spinach salad and fresh bread, this makes a terrific dish for any meal! I found this recipe in Company's Coming for Christmas cookbook.

    Recipe #224610

    3 Reviews |  By J. Ko

    Kim chi jji ge is The most popular stew in Korea. There are almost as many variations as there are cooks. You can add beef, tofu, canned tuna, vegetables such as squash, onion, carrot, etc... be creative! I found this recipe on the Korean Kitchen website and have served it to our Korean homestay student, and her friends, on several occasions. They have all said it is as good as what their mothers make.

    Recipe #222096

    Who says a fondue has to be high fat? This is a great flavour-infused, broth-based fondue for those who are health conscious. The key to hot-pot cooking is in the broth. Use homemade or a good quality packaged broth. Remember to always arrange raw meats, poultry and seafood on separate platters from the vegetables and other ingredients.

    Recipe #222043

    2 Reviews |  By J. Ko

    This is a great recipe to use at Thanksgiving or Christmas because it can be made ahead and heated through when needed. I usually make a half recipe because we are a family of 5. I got this recipe from Company's Coming.

    Recipe #221988

    "Ddeok" is a general term for Korean rice cake. There are many kinds of ddeok in Korea. They can be used as a dessert or in a savory dish. The plain tubular shape ddeok is called "ga rae ddeok", and they cut into ovals to cook "ddeok gook" which is the traditional soup for New Years. Or you can use tiny snowman shape "jo raeng ee ddoek". For "ddoek bok ee", we use narrower tube-shaped rice cake, cut into about 2-inch long pieces. In this dish, I prefer ovals because they cook very quickly, but the tube shape is fine also. I got this recipe from the Korean Kitchen web site. It's a good dish for those who would like to try something Korean, but are afraid of the heat. The preparation time includes soaking the rice cake for 1 hour.

    Recipe #221982

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