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    60 Recipes

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    This recipe comes from the cookbook, "Eat Caribbean" by Jamaican, Virginia Burke. Jerk is a style of cooking developed by the "maroons" (run away slaves ) of Jamaica. There are very many versions of Jamaican Jerk Marinades. It can be used on on pork, chicken or fish. A blender or food processor can be used to make quick work of all the chopping.

    Recipe #204926

    Not as complicated as it looks.This version only looks difficult because I tried to explain the technique carefully for first time makers of this dish. There is another recipe posted for this, but I feel it is too vague. This is the first meat dish that I learned to cook at age 12, so it's not that hard. You can do the exact same thing with cubes of beef, pork, lamb or oxtail. What's with all the optional ingredients you ask? Well traditionally all the ingredients listed are used but who isn't watching their salt and fat intake these days? If I am cooking this for guests, I use the optional ingredients but even then I use low salt versions of the sauces and check with my guests first for dietary restrictions. Either way it's great.

    Recipe #190849

    We have an avocado tree and I make these sandwiches for myself all the time. My 16 month old does not like avocados and this is the only way he'll eat them. There is a variety that tastes very buttery and my grandmother used to call the avocado "poor man's butter" because she would use it on bread instead of butter when times were hard. By itself the paste is an excellent first food for baby.

    Recipe #190939

    A nice treat for the kids. Okay I fess up - I'm a big kid:-)Use your favourite brand of commercial hard chocolate sauce or Recipe #151189.

    Recipe #205613

    Great with a cup of black coffee. This is my friend's grandmother's recipe. Mixed peel is the candied peel of various fruit. Use candied orange peel or candied papaya peel or a combination of the two.

    Recipe #190905

    This simple, yet terrific salad is served at Kariwak Village Hotel in Tobago. The recipe was featured in "Island Life" magazine. Delicious.

    Recipe #205416

    West Indian breakfast bread. Fry bakes is the Trinidadian name. The rest of the Caribbean calls this Johnny Cakes. According to Côte-Çi, Côte-Là: Trinidad & Tobago Dictionary, by John Mendes, © 1986, "A Johnny Bake was originally called a journey bake, cooked especially so that it will remain edible on a long journey." It is a simple dough which can be roasted baked or fried. Stuff it with cheese, or with fried fish, or sausages or Recipe #220176 (salted cod fish). They are delicious plain, warm and slathered in butter. My 'Mama' (Grandma) on Canouan Island in the Grenadines made the best fried bakes that I know. I have tried to re-create her recipe. The yeast in this recipe is my personal preference. Traditionally this recipe does not use yeast. Will yield a marginally denser (no less delicious) bake without the yeast.

    Recipe #194158

    An interesting meld of Indian and Chinese cooking. My husband's cousin always makes this yummy rice for family gatherings. This is her recipe as told to me over the phone. Amounts in the ingredients are our best guesses since she doesn't measure the ingredients. I omitted the salt in the recipe because I cook low salt. You can add salt to taste at step 6. Very little is needed if you choose to add msg and bear in mind that oyster sauce usually contains some salt.

    Recipe #206272

    A typical Trinidadian side dish that is quick and easy to prepare for those busy week nights. You can't mess this up it's so easy. The measurements given are just guidelines, adjust to your preference.

    Recipe #215135

    A robust flavoured Trinidadian side dish or vegetarian spread for flatbreads. I don't usually add pepper to this as I think the flavour is intense enough. If not using a non- stick pan increase the oil to 2 tablespoons.

    Recipe #212211

    This is a low-fat, baked egg recipe. A variation on this would be to use chopped bell peppers instead of the leeks.

    Recipe #197463

    You can peel the potatoes or leave the skins on in this recipe. I think the skins add something to the flavour and texture of this dish.

    Recipe #219986

    I can't vouch for the authenticity of this dish as actually being South African but I can assure you that it is different and delicious. My mom's vegetarian friend brought this over to a potluck Christmas lunch when we were kids. Naturally as a family of serious carnivores we were suspicious of "vegetarian health stuff" and to say that us kids were fond of eggplant would be a gross understatement! We hated the stuff! So it was only under extreme pressure and outright threats from mom that we tasted this just to be polite. The fact that I am making this some 25 years later tells you that it's good. Vegetarians surprise your carnivore friends with this tasty side dish every time. Oh and by the way it's goes great with a roasted or stewed lamb! LOL

    Recipe #190687

    These muffins have a wonderful nutty flavour and nice crumb texture. For a healthier version omit the chocolate chips. This recipe is a work in progress as I want to experiment with other add-ins like blueberries and various nuts. One note of caution I cannot be certain of oven temp or times because my own oven's temps are a bit off, the best I can offer is not too high a heat and a longer baking time than ordinary muffins or they will burn on the outside and be undercooked in the middle. Let me know what times work for you and I will correct the baking temp and time.

    Recipe #209284

    Extremely popular at Carnival time. It can be bought piping hot from street vendors and is served at most carnival fêtes. West Indian corn is more starchy and less sweet than the North American variety but I don't imagine that other varieties of corn would detract from the flavour of this dish. Goes a lot faster if done in a pressure coooker. For the dumplings refer to recipe#183964

    Recipe #211905

    Ham is one of the traditional meat dishes served in Trinidadian homes at Christmas time. Many people I know bake it on Christmas Eve and have it for breakfast with freshly baked bread and a condiment called Chow Chow (Picalli Sauce). You are also likely to be served thick slices of ham with Christmas meat pies known as Pastelles. This recipe is simplicity itself and it's how I bake my ham every year. Enjoy!

    Recipe #190823

    This dish is often eaten with roti ( a local flatbread) but it will make a great vegetable side dish to any meal. What West Indians call pumpkin is actually calabaza squash.

    Recipe #219455

    Pepperpot, the national dish of Guyana, is an Amerindian meat stew which uses cassareep. Cassareep is a preservative made from grated cassava and flavoured with cinnamon and brown sugar. The Amerindians developed cassareep as a way of preserving meats in the days before refrigeration. Do not refrigerate leftovers. This dish develops flavour when left over a period of days. If not refrigerated, it MUST be reheated to a boil every day. In the early days, a pepperpot was always in the kitchen, and more meat was added to it each day, keeping the pot going for years. This recipe has been halved from the original.

    Recipe #192669

    Known as the Spice Isle, Grenada produces one third of the world's nutmeg. DO NOT substitute powdered nutmeg in this recipe. Once it is ground, nutmeg soon loses the oils which give it flavour and taste so do yourself a 'flavour' and never use that pre-ground stuff again.

    Recipe #195861

    Here is a popular dessert in my family. It comes from Naparima Girls' High School cook book. The original calls for almonds which I found to be rather bland. I loved it with brazil nuts. I have also substituted walnuts as it's not everyday I come by brazil nuts. Use which ever are your favourite. The next time I make this I plan to use caramelized pecans.

    Recipe #190694

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