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    8 Recipes

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    An old cornbread recipe originating in Ohio.

    Recipe #465945

    An old cornbread recipe originating in Kentucky

    Recipe #465944

    An old cornbread recipe originating in Arkansas

    Recipe #465942

    Traditional, old southern recipe for a staple in southern culinary enjoyment!

    Recipe #465940

    Hoe Cakes were the first simple forms of corn bread in the South. Simple corn meal mixed with water and salt and then baked. Originally, Native Americans cooked these on hot rocks in an open fire. They were commonly referred to as Ash Cakes. Later, settlers from Europe adopted the recipe, cooking the cakes on the blades of their hoes in the fireplace. Slaves baked theirs on a plank or the cotton hoe on hot embers. This is where they get the name “Hoe Cake”. Serve Hoe Cakes as bread or as a side item with dinner or as breakfast with butter and syrup.

    Recipe #465938

    Hoe Cakes were the first simple forms of corn bread in the South. Simple corn meal mixed with water and salt and then baked. Originally, Native Americans cooked these on hot rocks in an open fire. They were commonly referred to as Ash Cakes. Later, settlers from Europe adopted the recipe, cooking the cakes on the blades of their hoes in the fireplace. Slaves baked theirs on a plank or the cotton hoe on hot embers. This is where they get the name “Hoe Cake”. Serve Hoe Cakes as bread or as a side item with dinner or as breakfast with butter and syrup.

    Recipe #465936

    The Indians taught the earliest colonists to parch corn and mix it with boiling water and bake it in thin cakes. These were used by hunters and traders on their long journeys on foot over Indian trails hence the name “Journey Cake” which later became “Johnny Cake.”

    Recipe #465926

    General George Washington's typical breakfast has been described by members of his immediate family and several guests. His step-granddaughter, Nelly Custis Lewis, who was raised at Mount Vernon, wrote..."He rose before sunrise, always wrote or read until 7 in summer of half past seven in winter. His breakfast was then ready - he ate three small mush cakes (Indian meal) swimming in butter and honey, drank three cups of tea without cream..." "The bread business is as follows if you wish to make - 2 1/2 quarts of flour up-take at night one quart of flour, five table spoonfuls of yeast & as much lukewarm water as will make it the consistency of pancake batter, mix it in a large stone pot & set it near a warm hearth (or a moderate fire) make it at candlelight & let it remain until the next morning then add the remaining quart & a half by degrees with a spoon when well mixed let it stand 15 or 20 minutes & then bake it - of this dough in the morning, beat up a white & half of the yolk of an egg -& add as much lukewarm water as will make it like pancake batter, drop a spoonful at a time on a hoe or griddle (as we say in the south). When done on one side turn the other - the griddle must be rubbed in the first instance with a piece of beef suet or the fat of cold corned beef..." Excerpt from a letter written by Nelly Custis Lewis, Martha Washington's youngest granddaughter.

    Recipe #290751


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