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    This is one of my family's favourite recipes; I am constantly asked all the time to make it. I was taught it by a Moroccan friend who also lives in France - it is an old family recipe passed down for many years. It is great all year around - served with flat breads or pitta breads & assorted salads in spring & summer or served with hot fluffy & fruity couscous, assorted chutneys or pickles in the depths of winter. I make mine in a fantastic "Electric Tagine" made by Tefal; it of course works in a more traditional clay tagine - BUT the real secret is.......it works like a dream in a Slow cooker/Crock Pot. Try it out! If you cannot get Ras-el-Hanout, which is an exotic Moroccan spice mixture, including rose petals - don't worry, use the other spices I have listed instead; or I have a Ras-el-Hanout recipe posted on Recipezaar: Recipe #205185 N.B. I notice in a review that it has been suggested that Chemical Heat is needed!! The great thing about sharing recipes is that they can be adapted to personal taste. BUT, this is not supposed to be a "Hot" recipe, but a "Fragrant & Fruity" recipe!! A Tagine by definition is SLOW cooked over a LOW heat & is very fruity with subtle undertones of heat! However, life would be boring if you couldn't add a bit of "heat", but it's just not traditional. What is traditional, is to allow your guests to add their own heat, so have a bowl of "Harissa" on the table. Preserved lemons are also a wonderful and traditional addition - I have a recipe posted on Recipezaar: Recipe #209590 PLEASE NOTE: This recipe lists canned chickpeas in the ingredients, NOT dried! If you use dried chickpeas, you MUST soak them and cook them first!

    Recipe #137530

    This is a recipe I have been making for yonks now.....I first devised it about 18 years ago, when I was following Rosemary Connely's "Hip & Thigh Diet"!! It's a very easy low fat chicken dish, which can be pan fried or baked in the oven - I prefer the latter method, it's much easier! Serve it with a medley of gently steamed vegetables, rice or pasta. (NB: PLEASE note, one of the reviewers has stated that she cooked this in a crockpot!! I would NEVER suggest cooking this recipe in a crockpot, that's why it is NOT mentioned as a cooking method ANYWHERE in the recipe - only pan-fried or oven baked. Thanks! )

    Recipe #211485

    When I was growing up, we NEVER called this dish a "Gratin" - it was always Cauliflower cheese and was invariably our main meal and NOT an accompaniment! My mother had to be very clever and thrifty in what she bought & cooked, and in the absence of meat on the table, she used cheese as the protein! This dish has become very "fashionable" again is served in many guises, Cauliflower Noisette, Cauliflower Gratin, Cheese and Cauliflower Bake...but to me, it will always be just Cauliflower Cheese, and it remains one of my favourite meals! I do serve it as an accompaniment now, but you have to be very careful what you serve it with, as it is very cheesy and rich. Alternatively, just have it as a main meal and serve some homemade bread and butter with it and maybe some salad or steamed spring greens! By the way, if you make a large batch, it freezes very well - either in small plastic containers or in zip lock bags; defrost and microwave to re-heat OR reheat over a Bain Marie. Try wherever possible to use English Mustard AND a good mature Cheddar cheese in the sauce, it DOES make a huge difference to the taste, and other types of mustards & cheeses do not work as well.

    Recipe #216237

    I was taught how to cook fish and chips by my mum when I was about 12 years old; we were living in Hong Kong at the time and it was my mum's way of treating us to a little bit of home as a treat! My mum had this recipe written down on the back of an old envelope stuck inside her Be-Ro cookbook from 1952 - I never use any other method now! One trick is to make sure that everything is prepared and assembled ready for frying takeoff!!! If you are cooking for two or more people, have your oven on with a lined tray to keep the fish and chips warm. If you really want to be totally authentic, cut up squares of greaseproof paper and sheets of newspaper - place the fish and chips onto the greaseproof paper and then into a sheet of newspaper. All you need now is a pickled onion, salt and MALT VINEGAR! TIPS for CHIPS: I notice one reviewer had difficulty with the chips. Here are a few tips or tricks for chips: Make sure they are DRIED thoroughly. Make sure the fat is VERY hot - 190 degrees C. Certain potatoes are better for chipping, such as King Edwards, Desiree, Majestic, Maris Piper, and Romano. You can soak the chips for an hour before the first frying - it extracts excess starch, which helps in the "crisping" process! Always drain them thoroughly before serving. I hope these tips will help!

    Recipe #183399

    Make up a large batch of rustic artisanal bread dough, store it and then bake a loaf each day you need fresh bread, amazing but true! This is a hodge podge of old fashioned English and French rustic bread recipes; the bread dough is made up ahead of time and stored (in the old days) in an earthenware crock or bowl, with a lid. You tear a piece of the dough off as and when you want to bake a loaf of bread. Easy! I use this style of bread dough regularly in the B and B, so I can always have fresh bread or bread rolls on hand for breakfast. You can add other types of flour to the basic white batch, as long as the ratio remains the same - you can mix rye or wholewheat flour with the white, or add herbs, onions, seeds, fruit and other flavourings. The dough can be used as soon as the initial proving has finished, but it will keep in a cool place or a fridge for a week or two - I do not recommend longer than 2 weeks however. The dough can be used for free form bread loaves, in bread tins, as rolls or other shapes. I have kept this technique and recipe to myself for a while, but I have decided to share it on Zaar now, mainly as my daughter keeps asking for the basic dough recipe! I notice that this type of long-term or long-life bread dough has made a revival in a new book called “Artisan Bread in Five Minutes a Day”; this recipe however, is a very old technique and method, dough was always made up for the week and then kept in the cold room or pantry for daily baking. My grandmother who lived in a 600 year old cottage in Northern England, used to have a stone slab in the Pantry where she kept her crock and dough, I remember sticking my finger in it!! This amount makes about 4 to 5 loaves of bread, depending on the weight and shape of the bread that you bake.

    Recipe #340621

    Delicious chicken breasts, wrapped in bacon or pancetta to ensure they remain moist, stuffed with Boursin garlic & herb cheese and then roasted with cherry tomatoes on the vine......delectable! I have posted this recipe for two - obviously it is VERY easy to increase the quantities for more people. Serve with a selection of seasonal vegetables & a jacket potato for an all year round simple & impressive supper dish. These can be frozen at the stuffed and bacon wrapped stage - I often have at least a dozen, individually wrapped in cling film in the freezer. They take about 4-5 hours to defrost, so make sure you take them out of the freezer in time! A tip: I sometimes add a dollop of creme fraiche and a little white wine to the juices, to make an unctious wine sauce - this is optional, but delicious if you fancy a creamy sauce with these stuffed chicken breasts.

    Recipe #214740

    This is my Dad's recipe!!! Brilliant low fat & EASY roasted potato wedges with freshly ground black pepper and olive oil. I have also added garlic, lemon wedges, fresh thyme, fresh rosemary, cumin, chilli.......the list is endless! I have posted the basic recipe and it is obviously easy to add whatever you like, depending on the mood, season & type of meal you are serving. For example, rosemary is great with lamb dishes; thyme and oregano marries wonderfully with Italian & French cuisine; garlic and lemons are GREAT with roast chicken. The basic peppered recipe is still my favourite though - I use fleur de sel (local sea salt) in mine - but any coarse salt will be fine. I have given measurements for about 4 people......it is easily adapted up or down however!

    Recipe #193370

    Tender chunks of beef simmered in a fragrant & fruity broth enriched with honey - a traditional Moroccan tagine at it's best! I cook mine in a traditional tagine & an electric tagine; but I realise that not everyone has one, so I have also tested this out in my crock pot; it works REALLY well and is better when cooking larger quantities. The meat becomes meltingly tender and the fruity & spicy smell transports you immediately to Morocco........on a magic carpet maybe?? Yes, I am waxing lyrical I know - but this tagine is a real winner. It's not particularly seasonal, but I do think that the colder autumn & winter months are a good time to indulge in this North African comfort dish!

    Recipe #191946

    This traditional supper dish of sausages, bacon, onions and potatoes dates back at least as far as the early eighteenth century. It seems to be more of a city dish than a rural one: it was a favourite of Jonathan Swift, author of Gulliver's Travels and dean of Christ Church Cathedral in Dublin. In Dublin itself, coddle retains its reputation as a dish that can be prepared ahead of time and left in a very slow oven while the people who're going to eat it have to be out of the house for a while - making it an excellent dish for very busy people! The name of the dish is probably descended from the older word caudle, derived from a French word meaning "to boil gently, parboil, or stew". The more recent version of the verb, "coddle," is still applied to gently cooked eggs, "Coddled Eggs". Please note, the sausages used should be the best quality 100% pork sausages you can get your hands on! This recipe would also work VERY well if cooked in a crock-pot, reduce the liquid by about half if cooking the coddle this way. Serve with Guinness and Irish soda bread. Although this is an easy to prepare one pot meal and its simplicity belies its amazing taste and flavour - comfort food at its best! Sláinte.

    Recipe #288885

    Stunningly easy but really impressive recipe! Simply marinade the chicken breasts in the sauce & pan fry them for an elegant but simple supper! Serve with rice, pasta or a medley of fresh seasonal vegetables with steamed new potatoes.This is one of my "fail safe" recipes - it is also brilliant on the Barbeque or oven baked! Also great with roasted Cherry Tomatoes. You can also use lean pork chops for this recipe.

    Recipe #176182

    This classic French potato gratin dish is world famous, and rightly so! I am quite happy to have this as a main meal, with just some crusty bread and a large mixed salad on the side. I have heard that this famous dish was created as a way of encouraging the "Dauphin" (the young prince destined to become King Henri II), to eat up his vegetables, hence the name! Maybe - it is certainly just as popular with children, as it is with adults. Try to slice the potatoes as thinly as possible for the best results. A wonderful accompaniment for all sorts of roast meats, stews, casseroles and poultry.

    Recipe #248268

    Exactly as the title says, these are cooked in a muffin or Yorkshire pudding tin! They are a brilliant way to use up leftover potatoes & are so good that it's worth baking or boiling up some potatoes specially!! I use these all the time in our Chambres d'Hotes - it's easy to work out the portions and they freeze beautifully. There is also NO burnt mess in your gratin dishes! That's not to say I never make traditional Gratin Dauphinoise, because I do - but these are a great standby, use up leftover potatoes and look very elegant when served!

    Recipe #203253

    A traditional style baguette de Campagne - rustic French bread, which is easy to make and has lots of body - it is NOT like the usual light, supermarket produced baguettes of today. This bread can be started off in a bread machine if you wish. Marianne is the national symbol of France; she personifies Liberty, Reason & the Triumph of the Republic. She appears on stamps, government forms, town halls, law courts and the former French franc coins & banknotes; she even appears on high quality Label Rouge Baguettes and Pain!! Therefore, I have called this homemade French Bread/Baguette recipe after her.....it seems only right and proper!

    Recipe #235909

    Swedish meatballs must be the most famous "export" recipe from this fascinating country. I like to think that these are a little bit different, and more authentic than most recipes you see. This is REAL Swedish home cooking at its best - and if you can manage to get hold of Lingonberries, you will notice a wonderful & very subtle difference; however, cranberries will do just as well. These meatballs are perfect served with piles of mashed potatoes or broad ribbon pasta.

    Recipe #235024

    A must for cool people - or those who like cucumbers! This is a very versatile sandwich spread or dip, which is so easy to whip up at the last minute; it makes VERY elegant sandwiches and is a wonderful accompaniment for smoked salmon, prawns (shrimp) or tuna. I have also used it to spread on savoury scones and crackers. If you plan to make this a day before you need to use it, you might like to salt the cucumbers first - as they do release water into the spread.

    Recipe #300257

    A delicious recipe using red cabbage, fragrant spices & apples or pears; whilst this is happily cooking away, the spicy smell pervades the kitchen & indeed the rest of the house and heralds the start of my festive baking & freezing season - who needs expensive pot-pourries! Not only is this dish delectable to eat alongside turkey, pork, beef and hams in particular - but the colour is just gorgeous, a rich jewelled ruby red! This cabbage can be kept warm for long periods, reheated and also freezes very well, making it a very well behaved recipe!!

    Recipe #191313

    A delicious and seriously lemon flavoured sticky drizzle cake which echoes the children's rhyme...."Easy peasy lemon squeezie"........EASY TO MAKE! An all-in-one recipe to rustle up at the last minute and impress your friends! When it's raspberry season, I sprinkle fresh raspberries over the top; it can also be served warm with creme fraiche, cream or ice cream as a Pudding Cake.

    Recipe #176514

    My two versions of this classic French café/bistro sandwich - oven baked for large quantities and ease.......or, the traditional frying pan/skillet method! You can always rely upon the French to add a certain "je ne sais quoi" to even the simplest food ...including the humble cheese and ham sandwich. The croque-monsieur (which becomes a croque-madame if you top it with a fried egg) is a great favourite in French cafés & bistros, and there are as many methods of crafting it as there are cafés! This one works for me. But, please be warned ... it's not for calorie-counters, the Cholesterol Police or those of a nervous disposition!!

    Recipe #234010

    This is the name that my daughter came up with, for my most requested lamb dish! She did not realise how easy it was to cook, as the results are so sophisticated and special! I have never made it other than in the crock-pot, but I am sure it would cook very well in an AGA or wood burning range......long and slow. This is an ALL YEAR around recipe, as we have cooked this in the summer and served this meltingly tender lamb with salads and crusty bread - as well as in the winter with mountains of mashed potatoes! The redcurrant and honey glaze is sensational, and makes the most divine gravy or sauce. Do not be tempted to use a cheap and low fruit content redcurrant jelly, it gives nowhere near the same taste and results as a high fruit jelly. I always use a leg of lamb for this dish - but I suspect that shoulder of lamb would work extremely well. Be warned......this is a fall off the bone, moist and very succulent way of cooking lamb!!

    Recipe #219423

    Comfort food at its best! A traditional recipe handed down to me by my Mum and her Mum before her......it was my favourite after school tea time meal & is still a firm family favourite even now! I serve mine with lashings of onion gravy and piles of fluffy & buttery mashed potatoes. I used to make mini versions of this recipe for my daughter when she was little - they make great appetizers before a Halloween/Bonfire night supper or a children's Party! For the mini version, just use a small cake/pie tins or a small muffin tray and split your sausages into quarters OR use cocktail sausages. The following recipe is for 4 people served with potatoes & gravy - the recipe can easily be doubled for more people or if served by itself.

    Recipe #184023

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