Recipe Sifter

X
  • Start Here
    • Course
    • Main Ingredient
    • Cuisine
    • Preparation
    • Occasion
    • Diet
    • Nutrition
1

Select () or exclude () categories to narrow your recipe search.

2

As you select categories, the number of matching recipes will update.

Make some selections to begin narrowing your results.
  • Calories
  • Amount per serving
    1. Total Fat
    2. Saturated Fat
    3. Polyunsat. Fat
    4. Monounsat. Fat
    5. Trans Fat
  • Cholesterol
  • Sodium
  • Potassium
  • Total Carbohydrates
    1. Dietary Fiber
    2. Sugars
  • Protein
  • Vitamin A
  • Vitamin B6
  • Vitamin B12
  • Vitamin C
  • Calcium
  • Iron
  • Vitamin E
  • Magnesium
  • Alcohol
  • Caffeine
  • Find exactly what you're looking for with the web's most powerful recipe filtering tool.

    You are in: Home / French Tart's Public Recipes
    Lost? Site Map

    Recipe Box is Here

    Save your favorite recipes

    Upload your own

    Create and manage Shopping Lists

    Share with friends

    500 Recipes

    Sort by: Newest | Rating | Photos | Time to Make | A-Z

    Mama mia! Limoncello syllabub with lemon sugar is a delicously light and airy dessert with an Italian tipple. It's the ideal easy no-cook dessert recipe to have up your sleeve should unexpected food loving guests turn up, or to impress a new date. Verrines are French, little appetisers or desserts served in shot glasses and they are very much in vogue at present! Limoncello is an Italian lemon liqueur best served straight from the freezer. Find it in off licences, Italian delis and some larger supermarkets. (Recipe from Delicious.)

    Recipe #422842

    The delicious golden-crusted traditional Hollygog pudding originates from Oxfordshire in England and is a pudding delight. Oxfordshire is a varied county, with a rural character that contrasts with the sophistication of its principal town, and this is a typical simple, robust Oxfordshire farm pudding. On National Pudding Day, the Breakfast crew of BBC Radio Oxfordshire, set the Old Farmhouse Bakery in Steventon a challenge, to make an old Hollygog Pudding based on an Oxford recipe. Kate Bitmead and the team at the bakery rose to the challenge and before the end of the show had produced the delicious golden-crusted traditional Hollygog pudding. Kate’s tip is to drizzle generous spoonfuls of the custard-like sauce that comes out of the pudding during cooking on top and enjoy! Here is the delicious result, with courtesy of BBC radio Oxford and The Old farmhouse bakery team. I posted this recipe after seeing it on a foodie blog recently; I have had this recipe saved for some time now with a view to making it, as well as sharing it! Enjoy!

    Recipe #422774

    I cannot believe there is no "recipe" for marmite on toast here! Okay, maybe calling it a recipe is stretching it a bit far, but it is a British breakfast classic, and if you LOVE marmite, you will love marmite on hot buttered toast! Use a nice nutty, granary bread and a cheeky little butter for the prefect Marmite in Toast extravaganza! Make a perfect pot of tea, Recipe #263420, for the perfect accompaniment and away you go, you’ll be saying "Cor blimey Guv'ner" in no time!

    Recipe #422206

    A fabulous and very old British recipe - whole fresh lemons are encased in a light suet pastry case which is then steamed to make the most delicious self-saucing dessert. This is a classic British pudding which is easy to make and a tasty and tangy way to end a rich meal, such a Sunday lunch. What's in a name? Made of a suet pastry which encases the whole lemons, with butter and sugar, after lengthy steaming they all melt together to make the pond, hence the name! Historical note about Sussex Pond Pudding: Suet was particularly popular as an ingredient in the southern half of England, and there are suggestions that the women of Sussex were especially adept at making use of it. Westham, Chailey, Lancing and Horsham all have associations with the pudding, but doubtless a number of other towns and villages in the county will claim it as their own. In days gone by the pudding was more often made by gently simmering the pudding in a clout or cloth, and some believe that this method continued longer in Sussex than elsewhere in the country. Sussex Pond Pudding consists of suet pastry formed in a pudding basin. Inside the pastry case a filling made of equal quantities of brown sugar and butter and 1 or 2 whole lemons scrubbed, and then pricked all over. The pastry lid seals the goodness inside, and the whole pudding is steamed at length. The lengthy steaming is required to work the magic inside the pastry: the juices of the lemon, mix with the melted butter and the brown sugar, creating a rich but sharp sauce that should gush from the pudding when it is cut into at table. ‘Pond’, appears to refer to the brown liquid that surrounds the pudding on its plate. Older sources indicate another possibility, that ‘pond’ was a corruption of the ‘pound’ of sauce that was produced from the pudding. (Recipe from Delicious magazine and historical notes from The Pudding Club.)

    Recipe #421544

    This is probably one of the lightest and most mouth-watering puddings ever invented. This delightful old fashioned British "Pud" consists of layers of baked custard, raspberry jam and is finished with clouds of light, fluffy meringue - truly a Queen in the pudding world. It is a quintessential Nursery dessert, something that Nanny would rustle up for her young charges in the nursery. My mum would often make this for Sunday high tea, and we all loved it. I often use brioche crumbs for a richer custard base, but any white bread crumbs will be fine. There are numerous recipes for this classic dessert; this recipe is by James Martin, one of my favourite British chefs.

    Recipe #421542

    Delicious cheesy scones with crispy bacon, a real treat for breakfast or high tea. These traditional scones are wonderful when served with fried or scrambled eggs for breakfast, alongside grilled tomatoes or mushrooms maybe. This is a recipe from an old W. I. (Woman's Insitute) cookbook and originates from the city of Birmingham, in the Midlands, England. Traditional comforting and British fare on a plate! Note: Brummie is the British slang term for people who come from Birmingham.

    Recipe #421082

    Alexis Soyer invented this dish at the Reform Club - maybe the late arrival of a tricky and hungry club member, as well as an ingenious chef who had to make the most of what he had in his kitchen, might explain the creation of this somewhat strange concoction. But the tangy sweet and sour sauce works and is one of Soyer's best-known dishes. It's in danger of becoming a forgotten classic, but I think it's worth reviving. I suppose it goes back to the days of disguising inferior cuts of meat - the gentleman's club equivalent of the fish finger or fried chicken in a basket! The recipe has been altered over time - but this is pretty close to the original. I wouldn't suggest using cheap meat of course, but coating the cutlets in breadcrumbs keeps them juicy and seals in the flavour. It is best to keep the garnish separate, so it can be eaten as it is or mixed into the sauce. About Alexis Soyer: Celebrity chefs are nothing new. One who really was the Jamie Oliver of his time, was Alexis Soyer. He was involved with charity work as well as being a popular figure on the culinary circuit, chef de cuisine of the Reform Club and author of many cookery books. During the potato famine of 1847 he went to Ireland to help victims by setting up soup kitchens - he claimed he could provide 100 gallons of soup for £1 including expenses. Like high-profile chefs today he was often asked to cook for large numbers at prestigious events and in June 1838 rose to the challenge of cooking breakfast for 2,000 people for Queen Victoria's coronation. He designed the Reform Club's kitchens, installing advanced technology gas ovens, which became a bit of a tourist attraction and source of envy among his peers.

    Recipe #421081

    Delicious light pancakes made with oats and yeast - traditionally from the Midlands region in England, in particular the county of Staffordshire. The Potteries, an area that is the birthplace of many famous people including Arnold Bennett, Sir Stanley Matthews, Reginald Mitchell, Captain Edward Smith of the Titanic, Josiah Wedgwood, and more recently Robbie Williams…….but just as important to the Potteries as Royal Doulton, Wedgwood etc., are Staffordshire Oatcakes. Once only eaten locally, the Staffordshire Oatcake has grown steadily in popularity over recent years. The traditional filling would be practically any combination of ingredients from an ‘all-day breakfast’ but anything goes these days. Chicken curry, chilli con carne, scrambled eggs, smoked salmon and coronation chicken are now quite the norm amongst the oatcake avant-garde, as well as golden syrup, honey, jam and cream.

    Recipe #421079

    MUCH better than shop bought crumpets, these are easy to make and are a rewarding and comforting meal for breakfast, tea or supper. Crumpets, pikelets, Scotch pancakes and English muffins: all traditional British tea-time treats but what's the difference? That's a good question! They're all cooked on a griddle or bakestone (a heavy-based frying-pan can be used as an alternative) but crumpets and muffins are both yeast-based. To make crumpets, you need egg rings (available from kitchen or hardware shops) or, if you can get them, special crumpet rings, and they need to be well-greased. More about crumpets: crumpets are flattened round breads which are cooked on a griddle or in a skillet. They are closely associated with English society and culture, and are sometimes confused with English muffins. Although the crumpet and the English muffin share some characteristics, the two foods are in fact very different. Classic crumpets have a smooth round bottom, and a top riddled with small holes. They are served fresh from the griddle or toasted, and can be topped with cheese, bacon, honey, jam or clotted cream - although butter is the traditional crumpet topping. Crumpets are never split, unlike English muffins, and they have a slightly spongy texture which absorbs butter remarkably well. The concept of toasting crumpets over a fire is often associated with companionable rainy days in British fiction. For people who are still confused about the differences between crumpets and English muffins, remember that crumpets have a holey top, they are not split, and they are far less "bready" than English muffins tend to be. It is believed that the English muffin may have been invented by someone who was trying to replicate the crumpet, which explains the commonalities between the two. The recipes for English muffins and crumpets are also very different, with crumpets being made from batter and English muffins being made from a dough. Because crumpets are made from a batter, they must be cooked in metal rings called crumpet rings or they will lose their shape.

    Recipe #421076

    A delectable and spicy sandwich that uses vintage Farmhouse Cheddar cheese alongside spicy aubergine slices and mango chutney. I make this with granary bread for an extra dimension. This is another wonderful recipe from the West Country Farmhouse Cheesemakers website, who promote hand-made cheeses from Farmhouses in the West Country of England. www.farmhousecheesemakers.co.uk (Prep time includes cooking the aubergine slices.)

    Recipe #421075

    This recipe is simplicity itself but truly festive and delicious, real Farmhouse Cheddar cheese melted with cranberry jelly between rustic thick sliced bread. Great with a glass of spiced mulled wine at Christmas, or with a chillled Rose or Chardonnay in the summer. Recipe from West Country Farmhouse Cheesemakers. Here is what they say about their special cheeses: "Welcome to the West Country Farmhouse Cheesemakers website, the home of authentic handmade Farmhouse Cheddar. Here you’ll discover everything you need to know about the world’s finest cheeses to enjoy over the festive period. We’re a small group of farmers based in the South West of England and we share a passion for the traditional art of cheesemaking. Every one of our Cheddars is made in the West Country, by West Country families using West Country milk. That’s why we can call them West Country cheeses. Every one of our authentic cheeses is made on the farm. That’s what makes them authentic Farmhouse cheeses. Every one of them is made by hand. That’s why we can call them handmade. It’s the care and expertise of our cheesemakers and the different geographical locations of our farms that gives each of our cheeses a character of its own. Our Farmhouse cheeses have a lingering, full-bodied and complex flavour with a start, a middle and an end, and their texture is substantial yet temptingly crumbly." www.farmhousecheesemakers.co.uk

    Recipe #421074

    Crispy roast chicken is served with a creamy Riesling, shallot and grape sauce - elegant enough for a dinner party or simple enough for a family meal, this really is a great recipe. This is a new Delia Smith recipe that she devised for Waitrose, and it is simply stunning! I have made it twice now and with great success. Delia says: "Now that roasting chickens are generally smaller, the absolute best way to roast them is fast. If you've not tried this yet, you simply have to, because once you've tasted the crispy outside and the succulent juiciness inside, you'll never roast a chicken any other way." I totally agree, and my only stipulation would be to make sure that you use a good organic chicken from a reputable farmer's market, butcher or supermarket.

    Recipe #420280

    These lovely little dinner or breakfast rolls are found everywhere in Belgium, and in most parts of France too. The last time I had them was a cosy Bed and Breakfast in Bruges, where they were served warm with fresh butter and boiled eggs for breakfast. They can vary in what type of flour is used, but they must always have the distinctive split, due to them being cut with the handle of a wooden spoon before baking. They are crusty and yet light inside, and make great sandwiches for picnics or a light lunch. This recipe is the result of numerous trial and error baking sessions, and the pistolets bread rolls are nutty and full of onion flavour. I start these off in the bread machine for ease when I am pushed for time, but they are just as easily made the more traditional way, mixing and proving by hand. NB: As one reviewer found out, baking can be a challenge, and in most cases an exact science. Do try to stick to the recipe as written - you won't be disappointed! Thanks!

    Recipe #416868

    What can be nicer then inviting friends and family over for an old fashioned afternoon tea. Homemade bread, sandwiches, cakes, biscuits (cookies) and these delightful rose scented coconut macaroons. These are not the same as the little piped, multi-coloured and flavoured macaroons that you find in France; these are rustic and yet elegant little coconut mounds or pyramids, real old fashioned biscuit type cakes. As well as being delicious, these are also easy to make. If you would like to add a little food colouring to make them a pale pink, that would make them look so pretty! BUT, be warned, do add the colouring carefully, many a pale rose coloured biscuit (cookie) has ended up a bright puce colour! Recipe from Francis Bissell.

    Recipe #416578

    A wonderful addition to any cook's pantry, this lavender infused vinegar is easy to make and adds a certain j' nés quoi to any savoury dish. Use it in my Lavender Mayonnaise or to flavour a salad dressing – all the lavender taste but not the chewy lavender buds! This vinegar retains not only the flavour of the lavender, but also the fragrance too. If you have the lavender bushes, it is worth making a few bottles of this, it will enliven any drear winter’s day and makes a great gift for a foodie friend. This is a Francis Bissell recipe, from a great little cookbook that my daughter bought for me this Mother’s Day!

    Recipe #416577

    This is a fabulous recipe, or rather a recipe idea. I use this lavender mayonnaise throughout the summer months; it marries so well with poached salmon and is wonderful when served with canapés, salads, cold roast chicken and most types of fish and seafood. It is easy; simply add a drop or two of lavender infused vinegar to homemade or good quality readymade mayonnaise for a floral fantasy at your dinner table! By all means add a few lavender buds when serving this, as a garnish, it adds to the whole dining experience. I have a recipe for lavender vinegar: Recipe #416577

    Recipe #416576

    A simple and beautiful syrup that is easy to make and gives amazing results. My front garden is covered in little sweet violets every spring and although I crystallise them or cut them for the spring dinner table, I recently found this old recipe for making violet syrup, which is fabulous. So, I have been busy making Sweet Violet Syrup this year! The syrup is great when added to icings and butter cream for cakes; and is wonderful when used in beverages too. Only a small amount is needed to add to sparkling wine or lemonade for a delectable and elegant drink. I have also added the syrup for flavouring to homemade macaroons, French Macarons. Why not make a homemade violet ice cream, or add this to junkets and blancmanges, the list is endless! NB: Six handfuls are about 3 ounces. A bottle of this makes a great gift for a foodie friend, add a label with serving ideas; one teaspoon is usually enough for most recipes.

    Recipe #416575

    This is SUCH a wonderful old recipe! Fresh butter is mixed with floral scented waters, such as rose water or orange blossom water and is delicious as an alternative to clotted cream, especially when spread on freshly made scones. It is also wonderful with all types of griddle cakes, crumpets and traditional tea cakes and breads. This floral butter dates back to the 18th Century and is featured in Mrs Beeton's Book of Household Management, as well as numerous other historical cookbooks. This recipe adapts well to modern cooking - and would make a stunning feature at any Victorian style Ladies' afternoon tea party or even a little girl's birthday party. Serve this with pancakes for breakfast or brunch, the possibilities are endless!

    Recipe #416574

    Juicy British bangers (sausages) with baked beans, fresh eggs, fried bread fingers and tomatoes. Yup! It's bold and brash, but a great brunch idea for those days when half a grapefruit and some cereal just doesn't tick the boxes! I cook this on a griddle - it is easier to fit all the food on at the same time, and if you spray the griddle with oil, it is healthier too. Yes, you can add bacon or potatoes or even mushrooms, but we like this simple combination of bangers, beans, egg and tomatoes with fingers of crispy fried bread. Quantities listed are suggestions for two greedy people; please do adjust the amounts to suit your personal requirements. This sets you up for the day, especially if served with freshly squeezed orange juice and a pot of tea. We are normally too full to have toast, but toast and marmalade would be a great accompaniment if you have room!

    Recipe #415695

    Crisply fried roots, my favourite trio of parsnips, carrots and beetroot (beets) are lightly doused with fine French salt, fleur de sel. These are amazing with aperitifs and also finish off a simple sandwich, salad or soup lunch or with a flourish! You do need a mandolin to cut these thinly or a huge amount of precision and patience if you slice them by hand. You could add a few chopped fresh herbs to the salt, but I really think that the roots and sel de fleur sing beautifully by themselves. Another idea is to prepare several small bowls of the crisps/chips, seasoning each one differently. curry, cumin or ground star anise are all perfect. I'll leave it up to you!

    Recipe #415068

    « Previous 1 2 3 4 5 . . . 18 19 20 Next »
    Displaying up to 20 pages of results. To see all results, or register.
    Advertisement

    Free Weekly Newsletter

    Get the latest recipes and tips delivered right to your inbox.

    Your e-mail is safe. Privacy Policy
    Advertisement

    Over 475,000 Recipes

    Food.com Network of Sites