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    500 Recipes

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    Just in time for autumn and Halloween - this delicious pudding is a real winner, with the subtle taste of toffee and apples all cooked together in a bread and butter pudding! I found this recipe in a cookery leaflet promoting English apples, and it is now one of our favourite puddings for the cooler months. I have given a variety of breads/yeast cakes to use; although I have made this with all of the choices on offer, my favourite still remains the brioche - I am sure croissants would work very well too.

    Recipe #255210

    A delectable starter or luncheon dish that I devised for the Auberge. King prawns, in their shells or with the tails still intact - pan fried in a warm dressing of lemon, lime and lovage with Pineau des Charentes and crème fraiche! Convinced? Here is the recipe! Serve with Mesclun or mixed salad leaves of your choice and lots of crusty bread for mopping up those juices! In the event you cannot get hold of Pineau des Charentes, use Port of Fino Sherry instead.

    Recipe #254971

    This is such a wonderful and traditional English recipe for Hallowe'en - All Hallow's Eve! It was a dish traditionally served to unmarried guests with a ring hidden inside. Whoever found the ring would be the next one to be married! This delicious mashed potato has nine ingredients in it - hence its name. Serve it as a supper dish by itself, or as an accompaniment to bangers/sausages, for a comforting Autumn supper dish! For those whom may be interested, a brief history on the origins of Hallowe'en: In ancient Britain this date was the pre-Christian eve of the New Year and Celtic Harvest Festival, when the souls of the dead were thought to revisit their homes to eat and drink. People left refreshments on the table and unlocked their doors before retiring for the night, then bells were rung, fires lit to guide the returning souls back to earth and animals were brought in for the winter. After Hallowe'en became a Christian festival, supernatural associations continued to thrive. It was believed that witches were abroad and that it was possible for certain people to perform magic and summon up spirits. Hallowe'en was once a time for making mischief - many parts of England still recognise this date as Mischief Night - when children would knock on doors demanding a treat (Trick or Treat) and people would disguise themselves as witches, ghosts, kelpies and spunkies, in order to obtain food and money from nervous householders. In certain parts of England youths still play pranks on their neighbours by hiding garden ornaments, whitewashing walls and ringing doorbells in the dead of night.

    Recipe #254835

    This Anglo-Indian recipe is more a relish than a chutney, but it can be used like a chutney in cooking, as well as a condiment. A real "must" in this recipe are the Nigella Seeds, also known as Black Onion Seeds - these give the Relish/Chutney an authentic Indian flavour, as well as making it very special. It is delicious with all types of cheese boards, cold cuts and meat platters, burgers, sausages, curries and also when used in sandwiches. My daughter loves this in toasted cheese sandwiches! Or, give a jar as a gift as I often do! I couldn't resist giving it a "magical" name, especially as India is famous for its Rubies and Emeralds!

    Recipe #254269

    This is a very old English pumpkin pie recipe from Norfolk in East Anglia; it would have been known as Norfolk million pie - million being the old English word for a melon, marrow, pumpkin or any kind of gourd or squash. Please note, this is not the same as most of the modern North American pumpkin pie recipes, but is based on the original recipe from the 15th/16th century. As many of the Pilgrim Father's originated from East Anglia, this recipe undoubtedly crossed the Atlantic with them, and was probably served at their Thanksgiving dinner for the first harvest in the New World - pumpkins being in abundance there! You can use marrow or squash in this pie if you wish, it works just as well as it would have done in the 15th/16th Century! Please note, this recipe uses fresh pumpkin.

    Recipe #254268

    I always dry at least a kilo of orange peel during the summer months - and that keeps me right through until next year. This is not so much a recipe as a technique, but it is so useful to have a jar of this in your pantry throughout the drear winter months. I use this dried peel in daubes, tagines, stews, curries, marinades, desserts, cakes and baking. It really does not take that long to dry in direct sunshine - and the quicker it dries, the more intense the orange aroma and the higher the oil content. A great by-product of oranges, and a part that is normally thrown away!

    Recipe #254233

    We have a wonderful fig tree in our back garden, and this year I cannot keep up with all the fruit! We have had figs in salads, baked figs, figs and cheese - I have made fig chutney, bottled figs and figs in Armagnac...finally, I thought up this idea for a jam, as I think figs and ginger go so well together. It is delicious - and such a wonderful rich colour! Not only is it wonderful spread on toast or bread, but it is lovely dolloped on ice cream and hot desserts, or for steamed puddings! You need to use fresh figs for this recipe - you don’t get the same results with dried figs.

    Recipe #254187

    One of the mainstay recipes of Nanny's culinary repertoire for Nursery puddings, a classic British baked Jam Roly Poly - you cannot beat it! And, not just for children either, but "big" children, especially men love this pudding with lashings of custard! This pudding can be steamed as well as baked, but I much prefer the baked version for taste and ease. If you find shredded suet hard to obtain, put a block of butter in the freezer and grate it when it has frozen - this is the best substitute I know - it's the small grains or flakes of suet/butter that gives the pastry its rise and texture. I find the best jams for this delectable pudding are raspberry, plum and High Dumpsy Dearie; I have this recipe posted on Zaar: Recipe #253728. However, any other jam would be fine, depending on what you have available, and golden syrup is also delicious. Feel free to use vegetarian shredded suet as I often do, it is lighter than shredded beef suet, although not as traditional.

    Recipe #253994

    I cannot resist sharing this recipe with you all, if only to try to preserve its delightful name! Nobody appears to know where the name originated from, although it has been suggested that it was an enterprising farmer’s wife, using up her windfall fruit that came up with the quirky name. The jam is thought to originate from Worcestershire, although Gloucestershire also lays claim to it! Nevertheless, this is a wonderful jam which makes full use of three of my favourite Autumn fruits – Apples, Pears and Plums. The jam is a lovely deep rosy pink colour and is delicious not only on bread, toast and scones – but also when used in steamed jam puddings such as Jam Roly-Poly. Do not omit the lemon and ginger – they are the key to the flavour in this lovely jam. The recipe is easily increased or reduced, as long as the ratio of fruit is the same, it works just as well. N.B. It is sometimes seen as Dumpsie Dearie Jam. Please note that I have quoted UK yield - we use pound and half pound jars, which I believe may equate to pint and half pint jars in the States.

    Recipe #253728

    I grow this wonderful old fashioned herb in my herb garden, it's one of my favourites - I love it's warm celery-lemon flavour. Lovage was used extensively during the Middle ages - right up to Victorian times - then it somehow fell out of fashion, which is such a shame as it is such a versatile and interesting herb. This is a wonderful creamy salad dressing, which perks up any mundane leaves - I like to serve it with Mache or Lamb's Lettuce and Tomatoes for a simple and yet elegant starter. It also works well with cooked spring vegetables such as peas, baby carrots, new potatoes and young broad beans.

    Recipe #253325

    A family favourite in our household.....a creamy and easy soup which needs nothing more than good crusty rolls or home-baked bread to serve with it. This travels well in a Thermos flask making it an ideal and comforting soup to take on a picnic. This recipe is based on a Historical 16th/17th Century recipe, no milk was added then - it was made with stock only.

    Recipe #253324

    This delightful sandwich from Nice, in the South of France, started out as a Salade Niçoise in which stale bread was crumbled about an hour before it was served. The name literally means "bathed bread" - alluding to the spreading of olive oil on the bread and the softening of the inside of the bread after the filling has been added. It can be made with varying ingredients and various amounts but the basics are listed below, feel free to adapt it to your own preferences. I make these the night before we plan to go on a picnic; I then wrap a piece of greaseproof/brown paper around each roll or baguette sandwich, and tie them with kitchen string - it keeps them all together and looks very "French Rustic"! (It also helps to hold the sandwich together whilst eating them!) A French classic which is essential on the picnic menu.

    Recipe #253323

    A delightful apple chutney with the added kick of ginger. I make this every autumn when I harvest my apples from the garden - you can use windfall apples too. Chutney is such an interesting preserve as it combines sweet and savoury flavours, making it an ideal accompaniment for a range of dishes such as cold meats, salami, ham, pasties, pies and is essential in a traditional Ploughman's Lunch! I also add chutney to my curries, tagines and winter stews. The word chutney is derived from the Hindu word "chatni" meaning strongly spiced. Try to use good cooking apples with plenty of flavour and taste for the best results. This is based on a family recipe and is a mellow and mild type of chutney.

    Recipe #251103

    It's fig time here in SW France, and I have been busy making up new fig recipes, as well as making jams, pickles, alcohol steeped figs and chutneys with all our harvest! This was thrown together one Sunday afternoon as a starter for a lazy Al Fresco Sunday lunch - and since then I have had requests for it nearly every day! If you are lucky enough to have a fig tree, try and garnish the individual plates with a couple of washed leaves - it really adds a certain panache to the appearance of the salad! I have made this with Chevre - Goat's Cheese as well as Feta, and it was just as delicious. Amounts given are for a starter for 6 people - and assuming that the figs are medium to large in size; please adjust the quantities if necessary. Toasting the walnuts beforehand is well worth the effort, and if you toast more than is needed, any excess can be stored in an airtight container.

    Recipe #250866

    Just the words Ploughman's Lunch, conjures up images of lazy lunches sat outside with friends, in the Beer Garden of an old Country Pub! This is one of the most famous of pub lunches - so simple and yet so satisfying, especially if taken with a pint of real ale or cider! Although the term "Ploughman’s Lunch" was first coined in the 1930’s, as part of a very successful marketing campaign, the concept behind it goes back much further. Throughout the centuries, agricultural workers would take their lunch out to the fields with them; this usually consisted of bread and cheese with ale or cider - a perfect combination! It's easy to prepare and should consist of at least the following: crusty bread and butter; a selection of English cheeses; pickled onions; chutney and pickles. This also makes excellent picnic food, and is easy to pack and transport. I have two pickle recipes on Recipezaar that would be wonderful with this lunch: Recipe #246663 and Recipe #246675.

    Recipe #250126

    The "One Shot" is a generous slug of Bourbon whiskey, (My husband's favourite tipple after Scotch Whisky!) which I think really gives this sauce a lovely mellow feel to it. The "Smokin'" comes from the addition of liquid smoke and chipotle peppers, and the rest of the title tells you this is GREAT if used whilst cooking meat, poultry, sausages or fish OUTDOORS, preferably over wood or coals! I devised this barbecue/marinade sauce some time ago, and I have decided to post it now, in order to enter the Grilling and Barbecue Forum's BBQ sauce contest! I hope you enjoy this as much as we do - happy OUTDOOR cookin'!! N.B. Quantities listed fill a large jam jar, about 20 fluid ounces - you can cut back on the ingredients to suit your requirements, but it does keep very well in the fridge.

    Recipe #249779

    In the recipe for "Potatoes Anna", I have always been unsure who "Anna" was. I now have the answer.......Browsing through Julia Child's Mastering the Art of French Cooking, Vol. 2; I found this historical note about Pommes Anna: "It was created during the era of Napoleon III and named, as were many culinary triumphs in those days, after one of the grandes cocottes of the period. Whether it was an Anna Deslions, an Anna Judic, or simply Anna Untel, she has also immortalized the special double baking dish itself, la cocotte a pommes Anna, which is still made and which you can still buy at a fancy price". Sounds like a mandatory piece of kitchenware for all dedicated chefs and cooks to me!! This simple recipe is all in the preparation and presentation, and the use of very, very thinly sliced potatoes, that's the key to success. Since the dish is inverted, it is important that the first layer of potatoes be attractively arranged. Select perfect slices, and overlap them carefully. It is best cooked in a copper or cast iron omelette pan. If you don't have an "omelette pan" which is ovenproof, use a deep pie plate. Keep in mind the final shape makes the presentation. A watercress or parsley garnish adds colour. Serve warm and cut into wedges, like a cake or quiche.

    Recipe #248469

    This classic French potato gratin dish is world famous, and rightly so! I am quite happy to have this as a main meal, with just some crusty bread and a large mixed salad on the side. I have heard that this famous dish was created as a way of encouraging the "Dauphin" (the young prince destined to become King Henri II), to eat up his vegetables, hence the name! Maybe - it is certainly just as popular with children, as it is with adults. Try to slice the potatoes as thinly as possible for the best results. A wonderful accompaniment for all sorts of roast meats, stews, casseroles and poultry.

    Recipe #248268

    This classic French potato gratin dish literally translates as "Potatoes in the Style of the Baker's wife". The story is, that in the past, a French family would prepare these potatoes and then take them to the local boulangerie, the baker, to be cooked in the even heat of his oven, hence the name. Any sort of good quality stock will do, chicken, lamb, beef or vegetable. For a richer taste, a ratio of 50% hot stock and hot milk/cream can be used. If using lamb stock, it is nice to sprinkle the top of the potatoes with fresh Rosemary, and I often add a sprig of thyme to my potatoes when baking them. I have found that melted butter gives a better result than dotting butter, no burned and upturned edges anymore!

    Recipe #248261

    My Mum taught me how to do these when I was about ten years old - I remember helping her pick the roses! I try to have a good store of crystallised rose petals, as they are such an imginative, beautiful and edible decoration for cakes and desserts etc. Make sure your rose petals are free from pesticides and are not traffic polluted either. The more the fragrant the rose, the more fragrant the taste when you eat them! I have given these as gifts before, in an attractive tin and with an attached recipe hanging from the ribbon - unusual and yet edible! They are wonderful as decorations for my Recipe #183505.

    Recipe #248004

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