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    18 Recipes

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    3 Reviews |  By FabioH

    Swai is a relatively new fish in the meat counters of my area of the country. While shopping at Sam’s, I saw the bags of frozen Swai fillets and they looked so good that I decided to buy them even though I did not know what the heck a Swai was. I think that what appealed the most to me was the price; $3.99 per pound, wow! So, I brought it home and Googled it. Swai is apparently similar in behavior to the catfish. It comes from the Mekong Delta and other areas of Southeast Asia (Thailand, Laos and Vietnam). It is considered a white fish and it is sweet, mild in taste and nice and flaky. Since I had a whole bag of the fillets, I decided to experiment a bit and cooked them different ways. I fried it, baked it, grilled it, etc. It turned out great every way I tried it. However, my favorite experiment is as follows below.

    Recipe #488205

    Authentic bean recipe from my home state of Antioquia, Colombia. This is a daily staple in the countryside, accompanied by arepas, chicharron and fried ripe plantain.

    Recipe #488030

    As a child in Colombia, this dish was my most favorite breakfast concoction ever. I always looked forward to Sundays since my mom always made this for me on Sunday. Since then, I made it for my kids, my kids’ friends and my grandchildren. I can honestly tell you that I have not met a kid yet who does not love Heredia Hash.

    Recipe #487248

    2 Reviews |  By FabioH

    Colombian Hogao is a condiment used throughout the entire Hispanic world. Its composition and uses vary greatly from country to country as does its name. In the Caribbean version, for example, you may have heard it called “Sofrito”. Whatever you call it, it’s tangy and it’s great! Another great quality of hogao is that you can always adjust it to your taste; if you like the taste of tomatoes more than you do the onions, use more tomatoes, etc. This is one of those recipes that you really can’t mess-up. Here is a very simple and quick way to prepare it. For a real treat, try using two tablespoons of rendered bacon fat instead of butter, yummmmm. (Ouch! My poor heart!)

    Recipe #487502

    1 Reviews |  By FabioH

    My son recently showed me a recipe for Artisan bread that is incredibly tasty and easy to make. You can find the recipe at http://shoottocook.com/recipes/baking/artisan-bread-in-five-minutes/ . The name is Artisan Bread in “Five Minutes” and you really need to try it, it’s great. Using the dough I prepared from that recipe, I made my pizza crust and it turned out fantastic! This is also a great way to experiment, use different ingredients and adapt the pizza to your own taste.

    Recipe #487173

    My daughter Andrea has loved this stuff since she was little. It's a recipe that has been handed down form generation to generation. Now, Andrea makes it anytime we have a family dinner, Thanksgiving, etc. She has adapted it from her great grandmother's recipe to her grandmother's recipe, to her mom's recipe, to my recipe. Wonderful cream corn and cheese souffle for any occasion.

    Recipe #490765

    A Tale of Two Cites: Medellín and Bogotá. Bogotá is cold, the people are very traditional, 10 million of them! Medellín; A party town, warm (a.k.a. The City of Eternal Spring), party population 3 million. Most of my family came out of Medellín and its surroundings. Both cities have completely different cuisines. A couple of my uncles moved to Bogotá (I guess they like cold weather), married and stayed. My uncle Tulio married Inés and had 10 children. "Inecita", as we called her, was a great cook and her signature recipe was "Papas Chorreadas" which she would always make for me when my parents and I rolled into town. Here is my favorite recipe from my sweet Aunt Inecita.

    Recipe #488385

    Another of my daughter Andrea's recipes which she is allowing me to publish. For Thanksgiving, she decided to make a quiche just to be a little different. There may be other recipes out there that are similar but I promise that this recipe came out of her own imagination and a bit of discussion with me around the kitchen counter. Tell you what, this turned out great!

    Recipe #490829

    Paella originated in the provinces of Spain. An international dish nowadays with as many variations as countries that have embraced it, the different versions of Paella became better known in Latin America as Arroz a la Valenciana (Valencian Rice) and adapted to the agriculture and foodstuff available in the particular country. Nicaragua is quite famous for its love of Arroz a la Valenciana. Whatever you call it, it is delicious and can be very complicated. Most people agree that the traditional Paella must contain rabbit meat. However, if you have ever tried to debone a rabbit you will see why that tradition is not a popular one. So, here for your enjoyment, is a very simple way to make Arroz a la Valenciana. May the Paella gods forgive me.

    Recipe #488039

    1 Reviews |  By FabioH

    Empanadas Colombianas (Colombian Empanadas, great party item) (Pronounced ehm-pah-nah-dah) Empanadas are a tradition throughout the Hispanic world. Depending on what country you may find yourself, empanadas can vary greatly in flavor, uses and fillings. Even within one country, empanadas may be quite different from one region to the other. You see, empanadas developed very much along the same lines as Tacos and Burritos: Whatever happens to be available from leftovers or from the particular agriculture of a region, gets put inside the empanadas. In Colombia alone, there are a multitude of variations of the classic empanada starting from meat fillings to mashed potatoes, rice concoctions, squash, pumpkin, greens, jellies and other sweets, etc. Even in my home city of Medellín, empanadas can vary greatly from Envigado, to El Poblado, to San Pedro, to La Ceja, to Barbosa, to Belén, to Marique, to La Floresta to downtown (these are all suburbs of a city of over 3.5 million people)

    Recipe #487053

    My entire family loves these egg rolls. I have no idea where this particular recipe came from. Perhaps I "stole" it from someone, perhaps I got it out of a recipe book or magazine, or maybe I got it off the Internet back in its infancy. Somehow, I have a feeling that it may be bits and pieces of all these sources. In any case, this is the recipe I have made for many years and I am sticking to it! I truly hope you enjoy it because these eggs rolls are awesome.

    Recipe #488620

    1 Reviews |  By FabioH

    Sancocho is the staple food of my home state of Antioquia in Colombia. As with everything in this world, there are many varieties of sancocho not only within Colombia, but also throughout the Caribbean and Latin America. This recipe is my favorite because it utilizes four different types of meat whose flavors mix in an incredible taste sensation. Sancocho must be prepared in stages due to the cooking time differential of the various ingredients so give yourself three or four hours and be patient. The results are definitely worth the wait. By the way, I have not found a way of making just a small amount of sancocho so be prepared for lots of yummy leftovers unless, like my grandma did, you invite the entire family over for Sunday lunch.

    Recipe #487496

    1 Reviews |  By FabioH

    Our "Finca" (farm) in Colombia was about 5 hours from my home city of Medellín, although the roads are much better now and you can get there in about two to three hours. For vacation, my parents and I (as well as many relatives and their families) would go to the farms and have wonderful family reunions. We would always take the “ladder bus” that would leave Medellín at exactly 3:30 a.m.. At 7:00 a.m. the bus would always make the breakfast stop at the riverside town of Bolombolo, a dusty, hot town that survived by serving food, providing cheap accommaccommodations and selling trinkets to the buses going by. Since Bolombolo possessed the only bridge across the Cauca River for several hundred kilometers, the bus and trucking trade was very lucrative for the inhabitants. I always looked forward to our stop for breakfast in Bolombolo as this town was famous for its “empanadas” and its “papas rellenas”. I always had two of each with a large cup of hot chocolate. Pure heaven!

    Recipe #487881

    Now it is time for a party! My middle son got married to a most wonderful girl and we are welcoming them home from their honeymoon with a small family get-together. As a family favorite, my empanadas will be the principal side dish, along with various and sundry goodies. Everything is ready, I have everything prepared, including the masa. But, alas, in my excitement, I did not realize that I had run out of ground beef! With no time to spare, it is time to improvise. "I'll make chicken empanadas!" I thought. With no previous experience in the matter, I just grabbed 6 chicken thighs, cooked them and pulled the meat apart. So, below you will find my improvisation which, if I say so humbly, turned out as good or better than my beef empanadas. I love when an "experiment" is a success!

    Recipe #488655

    This year, the pumpkin vines in our garden were extremely prolific and early. So as not to waste the pumpkins or store them somewhere until the time came for the Jack-o-lanterns, I decided to use some of them to make pumpkin pie filling from scratch. I will tell you this: It is VERY labor intensive so give yourself plenty of time. The good thing is that, once you prepare the filling, you end up with a big batch which will make several pies. I store my filling in zipper bags in the freezer and it works just fine.

    Recipe #487720

    1 Reviews |  By FabioH

    After trying different recipes over the years, this is the recipe that I finally liked the most. This is really an adaptation and combination of the best parts of many other recipes from friends, family, the Internet and some cookbooks. The last time I made it, I gave a jar to each of my kids to try. They liked it so much that they asked for more and more. Then, as I was ready to use it in a dish, I found that it was all gone!

    Recipe #487485

    This is, by far, my grandson's most favorite food in the world! Although the recipe is very basic, I have adapted several recipes that I have tried over the years and have come up with this one as my final favorite.

    Recipe #488029

    Chorizo is another one of those foods that is common throughout Latin America and even in Europe. As with other common dishes, chorizo can vary greatly from country to country end even from region to region within the same country. Being from the state of Antioquia in Colombia, I am partial to the Antioquian chorizo, of course! This recipe is an adaptation of the chorizo recipe I found in my mother’s cookbook called “La Buena Mesa” published in 1952. I have also included some things that I learned at the farm while I helped grandma Tita stuff chorizo for Christmas. Of course, we stuffed them by hand with a long stick taken from a guava tree. Since I no longer have the energy or inclination to stuff it by hand and it is difficult to find good guava trees in Missouri, I have finally succumbed to innovation and use my trusty KitchenAid mixer/stuffer.

    Recipe #487102


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