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    You are in: Home / Mary the Disturbed Stick Woman's Public Recipes
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    7 Recipes

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    Like the title says, this is a "back to basics" teriyaki marinade that can also be made into a teriyaki sauce. "Teriyaki" sauce has found a home in many places around the world, and so there are a lot of variations, often containing a lot of sugar, honey, lemon juice, cornstarch, who knows what all. This is based on a simple, traditional marinade recipe by Gaku Homma, with only a small variation to create the sauce.

    Recipe #275065

    Most cranberry pie recipes mix cranberries and some other fruit, since cranberries are so tart. This recipe uses all cranberries, mixed with a small amount of sugar and topped with a butter-sugar-oat crumb topping that melts and drizzles down into the berries as the pie bakes. The resulting filling is tart but sweet enough, and the pie is just the thing if you don't want a super-sweet or very fatty dessert after a rich holiday dinner. About the butter: the original recipe in the Boston Globe called for 3/4 cup of butter. I found that excessive and cut it to 1/2 cup, which is still a bit much. You may want to experiment and cut it even more. There is a LOT of crumb topping, but use it -- you want lots of crumb. This makes a BIG pie!

    Recipe #140352

    This is one of my favorite recipes of any kind. It's tasty, healthy, easy, quick, and I'm happy eating it for days on end. It's based on a Goya recipe that I adapted to use brown rice for better nutritional value. If you want to eat more whole grains but just can't find appetizing ways to prepare them, give this a try. It can also be made with long-grain white rice if you prefer (not jasmine rice or anything like that, just the ordinary kind). The canned pigeon peas and sazon can both be found in the latino/hispanic/international section of most US supermarkets.

    Recipe #123999

    What’s Shanghaied Duck Ddeok? Well, everybody knows what a duck is. Ddeok, or more properly ddeok guk ddeok, is a Korean foodstuff whose name is translated as “rice cake”, and they’re not like the crunchy rice cakes that you put peanut butter on or whatever. They’re more like a thick, short, wide noodle made out of rice flour, with an oval shape about 2 ½ inches long. They’re also found in Chinese cuisine, but I don’t know their name in Chinese. They are sold in cellophane bags and in their dry form, they look a little like something’s toenails. Depending on how long they’ve been soaked and cooked, their texture is somewhere between a sort of rubbery, very al dente pasta, and a more conventional pasta texture. They are one of the world’s top ten oddly compelling foodstuffs. As for the “Shanghaied” part, Shanghai duck is a way to cook a whole or quartered duck in a brown soy-based sauce with scallions. Rather than starting from scratch, I decided to “Shanghai” some duck leftovers, adapting a Shanghai duck recipe to allow for the fact that I was using cooked and not raw duck, and add some ddeok. Voila – Shanghaied Duck Ddeok. This recipe assumes that you are starting with a roast duck, and you don’t need an entire one – I used leftovers and it just came out fine; the only thing that changes is the duck density. If you cook your own, roast it plain or using a recipe with appropriate spices (I used the Spicy Laquered[sic] Duck recipe), not using some other set of spices that won’t work with the Chinese spices of the Shanghai sauce.

    Recipe #120626

    There certainly are a lot of gravy recipes in the world, and more than a few good ones on Recipezaar! This is how we made it in my family, with inspirations from friends and neighbors. It's easier than some since there are no meatballs and just three steps once you get all the chopping done. It's the kind of recipe that invites coloring outside the lines: if you can't find boneless pork, use a pork chop; if you don't have sweet sausage, use hot sausage. You get the idea. The most important thing is make whatever you use good quality (and that definitely includes the wine!).

    Recipe #120314

    This was one of my mom's recipes, and one of the most popular dessert/cookie/snacks she made. It's ultra-simple and just about impossible to mess up unless you just flat-out burn it to a crisp.

    Recipe #118946

    This is a northern Indian-style flatbread, easy to make, very tasty, and a great accompaniment to a curry. It's adapted from the Rajasthani Salt and Spice Bread from "Flatbreads and Flavors" (Alvord and Duguid), with some small changes to create a healthier recipe. Preparation time includes 1 hour for the dough to rest.

    Recipe #115290


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