Recipe Sifter

X
  • Start Here
    • Course
    • Main Ingredient
    • Cuisine
    • Preparation
    • Occasion
    • Diet
    • Nutrition
1

Select () or exclude () categories to narrow your recipe search.

2

As you select categories, the number of matching recipes will update.

Make some selections to begin narrowing your results.
  • Calories
  • Amount per serving
    1. Total Fat
    2. Saturated Fat
    3. Polyunsat. Fat
    4. Monounsat. Fat
    5. Trans Fat
  • Cholesterol
  • Sodium
  • Potassium
  • Total Carbohydrates
    1. Dietary Fiber
    2. Sugars
  • Protein
  • Vitamin A
  • Vitamin B6
  • Vitamin B12
  • Vitamin C
  • Calcium
  • Iron
  • Vitamin E
  • Magnesium
  • Alcohol
  • Caffeine
  • Find exactly what you're looking for with the web's most powerful recipe filtering tool.

    You are in: Home / NcMysteryShopper's Public Recipes
    Lost? Site Map

    Recipe Box is Here

    Save your favorite recipes

    Upload your own

    Create and manage Shopping Lists

    Share with friends

    510 Recipes

    Sort by: Newest | Rating | Photos | Time to Make | A-Z

    This recipe for crispy chicken breasts seasoned with Chinese five-spice is great for those thin chicken cutlets that are always on sale! The recipe received its name from the Indiana natives and is from Food and Wine Magazine. It's awesome for picnics because it's good both hot and at room temperature. For a more refined dish, thinly slice the chicken and serve over a mixed baby greens. Fabulous paired with Herding Cats Chenin Blanc/Chardonnay.

    Recipe #247135

    The sweet-spicy marinade really intensifies the chicken's grilled flavors and elevates it to a new high for chicken! For a wonderfully deep maple flavor, use a dark amber syrup, if you can find it. Time does not include 30 minutes to 1 hour of marinating time.

    Recipe #247134

    The Mai Tai Cocktail is a beautiful tribute to rum....fine aged rum. If you like rum, you will like this strong cocktail. Contrary to popular belief, this is not a fruity cocktail and I cringe when I see bartenders add fruit juices to this perfect drink. If you like fruity drinks try a zombie or Maui Mai Tai - but if you like rum, this is a celebration. This is NOT the original Mai Tai recipe, but it is a fabulous version . The original Mai Tai was created in the early 40's by Trader Vic in Oakland. The name of the drink comes from the reaction of its first samplers, who were from Tahiti, when they exclaimed "Mai Tai - Roa Ae", which means "Out of This World - The Best".

    Recipe #245508

    I find Sea Breezes too bitter so this is my take on that old favorite. A definite must for all Divas!

    Recipe #245071

    We just love pear nectar, rum and mojitos.... While this is NOT a mojito the mint certainly hints at that wonderful drink. Recipe from bartender at Jäger in Seattle with preparation alterations.

    Recipe #245069

    Tasty tropical martini that reminds me of Tahiti!

    Recipe #245067

    A deliciously classy martini that highlights Campari and Limoncello! It tastes like summer in a glass! Serve this to your guests after a nice filling Italian meal! Please use premium vodka, anything less would be a disappointment. Based on the recipe from the Martini Bar in Miami.

    Recipe #245066

    Pisco is a clear brandy that is popular in both Peru and Chile. The white muscat grapes, from which pisco is distilled, were first grown in Peru by the Spaniards in the 16th century (at that time Peru & Chile were both part of Spain’s American empire.) When they became independent countries, both claimed the liquor as their own. Therefore the national drink of both Peru and Chile, is the rich “Pisco Sour.” However there is a difference in sweetness and the citrus used between the two countries’ piscos. I have posted both recipes so be sure to try the Recipe #243479 as well. Note: Egg whites are sometimes used in chilean pisco sours as well, but for the purist, they will say it is unnecessary adornment.

    Recipe #243483

    Pisco is a clear brandy that is popular in both Peru and Chile. The white muscat grapes, from which pisco is distilled, were first grown in Peru by the Spaniards in the 16th century (at that time Peru & Chile were both part of Spain’s American empire.) When they became independent countries, both claimed the liquor as their own. Therefore the national drink of both Peru and Chile, is the rich “Pisco Sour.” However there is a difference in sweetness and the fruit used between the two countries’ piscos. I have posted both recipes so be sure to try the Chilean Pisco Sour as well.

    Recipe #243479

    Caipirinha is the national drink of Brazil. The drink is made with cachaça (pronounced - kuh-sha-suh). It is technically a brandy and a member of the aguardente family. There is an old adage in Brazil: "quanto pior a cachaça, melhor a caipirinha" –– the worse the cachaça, the better the caipirinha. The name caipirinha is derived from the Portuguese word caipira (hick, hayseed, country bumpkin, rube, etc.) coupled with the -inha suffix (a diminutive denoting little or small) and can be roughly translated as little hick, little hayseed, little country bumpkin, little rube, etc., etc. Poor man’s drink or not, cachaça has become an integral part of Brazilian culture and its significance ranks right up there with soccer/football (futebol), carnival and samba as Brazilian national icons. The Brazilians like it sweet.... VERY sweet. In Brazil, the very best caipirinhas are made with "limões gallegos" –– what in the U.S. is often referred to as a key lime. Can also be made by the pitcher!

    Recipe #243468

    This recipe went over big-time with guests that do not enjoy fish! The very finely minced red onions lend a slight crunch and the capers explode with each bite adding a salty balance to the sweet herby mustard sauce that covers the delicate fish. This recipe uses fresh dill. Quick enough for a weekday meal but delicious enough to serve company. Pair it with steamed vegetables or homemade coleslaw and a baked potato for a complete meal. This recipe was created for RSC #10. Good luck to all the entrants!

    Recipe #243431

    If you like your Bloody Mary spicy and decadent then you will love this recipe! I like my Bloody Mary to be thick with small bits so I tried this recipe without straining it and just loved it (I used a food processor)! It was also very good strained for those that do not like them thick. The Kahlua adds a nice richness and a slight sweetness that tones down the peppers. This IS a Spicy Bloody Mary and it IS wonderful! For a Bloody Mary that is not as spicy you can use regular V8 instead of the spicy blend. This recipe was created for RSC #10.

    Recipe #243271

    If you like sweet and sour combinations then you will love Midori Sours! The traditional way to prepare a Midori Sours is to shake it on ice and strain it into a rocks glass, but I like them on the rocks and with a good quality vodka. Whichever way you prefer... they are still good!

    Recipe #243093

    The bow fold is very easy and nice way to dress up a casual table. It is very pretty with plain or patterned cloth napkins. If using a napkin with patterns use a plain napkin ring for best results! Step by Step Photos are included. Happy Folding!

    Recipe #242649

    This is a creamy buttery beverage. I like to sip it on the rocks rather then the shot, but the shot is good as well.

    Recipe #238073

    Beid hamine is an ancient Egyptian dish. The slow cooking yields eggs that are creamy and smooth. The onion skins impart a delicate brown color to the whites. The coffee grounds are optional, but they help add the desired brown color. Along with Ful Maddamas, Beid Hamine makes a typical Egyptian breakfast. Don't forgo the oil, it is added to minimize evaporation of the water during the long simmer.

    Recipe #233505

    These eggs are poached in a delicious in a pepper ragout. This dish, with many variations, is a popular breakfast in North Africa, especially in Algeria and Tunisia. Most recipes include the eggs, but they can actually be left out as well for Vegetarians that do not eat eggs. VARIATION: Sometimes fresh shrimp or a spicy lamb sausage called merguez is added to the simmering peppers along with the eggs.

    Recipe #233490

    Fesenjan, also known as khoresht-e fesenjan, is typically made for special occasions in Iran. It is traditionally made with duck or pheasant in the north of the country along the Caspian sea. It is a thick, rich, sweet-sour dish that improves in flavor the next day. Pomegranate syrup, sometimes called pomegranate molasses, is available in most Middle Eastern and health food stores (make sure it does not say "sour" ) If using fresh pomegranate juice, use 1 1/2 to 2 cups and reduce the stock or water. Adding a 1/2 tsp ground cardamom or 1/2 tsp cinnamon when sautéing the onions will add a richer flavor. Add more sugar if the sauce is too tart, or lime or lemon juice if it is too sweet. A peeled and cubed eggplant is sometimes added. Sauté the eggplant along with the onions. You may need to add a little more liquid as it simmers.

    Recipe #233487

    Pour in about a half inch of syrup into a tall glass, and add lots of ice cubes and seltzer or club soda. You might even prefer water instead. Iranis add a sprig of fresh mint and a sour cherry to the glass as well.

    Recipe #233331

    Hot mint tea is a favorite in Morocco, where it's served in small glasses any time of day or night. It's very sweet and packed with mint flavor. It is great cold as well; let the tea cool completely and then strain it into ice-filled glasses.

    Recipe #233330

    « Previous 1 2 3 4 5 6 . . . 18 19 20 Next »
    Displaying up to 20 pages of results. To see all results, or register.
    Advertisement

    Free Weekly Newsletter

    Get the latest recipes and tips delivered right to your inbox.

    Your e-mail is safe. Privacy Policy
    Advertisement

    Over 475,000 Recipes

    Food.com Network of Sites